Is there a way to give advice when it's not asked for?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Learner4Life, Apr 3, 2008.

  1. Learner4Life

    Learner4Life Cohort

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2007
    Messages:
    720
    Likes Received:
    0

    Apr 3, 2008

    I'm a 1st year "aide" in this school so I'm always afraid to say something when I notice something should be changed but I'm really REALLY struggling with this one...
    I observe and help in the 7th grade math class for 1 period a day. Right now we are learning about circle graphs, percentages, percents, and perportions. The teacher is doing a great job of describing circle graphs but hasn't started with the basics with these 7th graders... like how to use a protractor! Today was complete chaos because I'm trying discretely to show kids how to use the protractor while she's going on making an entire cirlce graph, graphing the angles and everything...
    Is there a way I can bring this up to her without sounding "high and mighty"? I really don't feel like I could do a better job than her, she does a supurb job as it is... it's just this one time that it's making my job even harder and her kids are completely lost and I dont' think she realizes it!
     
  2.  
  3. jsfowler

    jsfowler Companion

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2008
    Messages:
    165
    Likes Received:
    0

    Apr 3, 2008

    I would bring it up casually. "Our students are really struggling with using the protractors, aren't they? I don't think they learned how to use them last year." Don't make it sound like she is doing a bad job. Bring it to her attention that they are struggling and perhaps could use a quick review.
     
  4. historyteacher

    historyteacher Companion

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2006
    Messages:
    135
    Likes Received:
    0

    Apr 3, 2008

    I like the suggestion. This can really get into shaky ground with some people. She may not take the hint though, so you may have to continue circling the room giving quick "here's how you do it lessons." Believe me, if she doesn't listen to you then it should be clear when she provides some sort of assessment and scores or low, or at least let's hope so.
     
  5. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2007
    Messages:
    5,276
    Likes Received:
    1

    Apr 3, 2008

    Could you say something like, Ms. X, would you explain the so-and-so procedure/angle, etc. again? I don't think I got it. That offers no offense, and still allows the teacher to "save face."
     
  6. Bored of Ed

    Bored of Ed Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2006
    Messages:
    2,230
    Likes Received:
    1

    Apr 4, 2008

    I experienced this type of situation a LOT while being an aide -- the frustration was one of the things that pushed me to try teaching instead of spending another para-year! Mostly I just learned to bite my tongue and bear it, but Fowler's suggestion seems reasonable.
     
  7. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2008
    Messages:
    1,934
    Likes Received:
    257

    Apr 4, 2008

    You are right to be careful.

    Teachers generally do not take criticism well (maybe it comes from being so independent so often) from my experience even when it comes from colleagues or administrators. I love the idea of playing coy with it though. She most likely isn't even aware of the issue and bringing it up in such a way would at least get her thinking about it.
     
  8. Learner4Life

    Learner4Life Cohort

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2007
    Messages:
    720
    Likes Received:
    0

    Apr 4, 2008

    We did the same activity today but we had a lot more time for them to do their homework so I got to walk around and make sure each kid was doing it right and clarify a few things with the kids.

    The funny thing is, I know this teacher probably would have gone through these steps with the kids but she just got a smart board and I think she got caught up in showing the kids how to do it with this cool technology. I'm pretty sure I would've made the same mistake, except I hope I would've walked around the room and saw the kids had no clue what they were doing.
     
  9. BioAngel

    BioAngel Science Teacher - Grades 3-6

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2007
    Messages:
    3,644
    Likes Received:
    108

    Apr 5, 2008

    Have you mentioned it to her though? A good teacher is willing to hear how she can make her class better. People have already offered some wonderful suggestions on how to handle bringing it up to her--- I would just ask her if she knows if in prior years students were ever taught how to use the protractor. If she asks why you're asking, be honest: that you've noticed that students were paying attention to her lesson and she was doing a great job, but were having difficulty understanding how to use a protractor.

    It's not her being a bad teacher, plus you're the one who gets to walk around *probably* more often than she does to check up on the kids.

    If I ever need an aide, I hope she would feel comfortable enough to speak up during the class or talk to me after class about it. I had an aide in one of my 7th grade classes while student teaching and she was an amazing help to me. We would go back and forth throwing out information, without ever prepping together and I loved getting to talk to her any time we had a chance to.

    So test the grounds, see if she's willing to open up lines of communication with you, and be honest with her--- the students really need you to tell her where they need extra help.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 232 (members: 1, guests: 209, robots: 22)
test