Is there a syllabus for the state exams?

Discussion in 'Basic Skills Tests' started by DreamerSeeker, Sep 27, 2019.

  1. DreamerSeeker

    DreamerSeeker Rookie

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    Sep 27, 2019

    I'm still in the process of obtaining my teaching license and I was wondering if the Praxis (especially core math) has a syllabus? I'm asking because I've never seen one nor have I been told about one, but that would make studying a bit easier for me.

    Does anyone know about a syllabus for the state exams?
     
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  3. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Sep 27, 2019

    The free online Study Companion for each Praxis test gives an overview of what it can cover, typically beginning on or after the page that shows the breakdown of the test by domain and question type.

    Basic skills math exams as a class tend to test the following:
    • standard operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division) with integers, decimals, fractions and percentages;
    • simple statistics (mean, median, mode, range);
    • simple probability using fractions and/or percentages;
    • basic algebra, including the standard operations on monomials and binomials and setting up and solving linear equations;
    • measurement, including calculations with standard and metric units of length, mass, volume, time, and temperature;
    • basic geometry, including perimeter/circumference and area and possibly volume;
    • rounding and estimation, which are not quite the same thing (see TeacherGroupie's Law of Nomenclature: If two distinct terms seem to be referring to exactly the same thing, it's wise to assume that they don't refer to exactly the same thing and to try to figure out just what the difference is)
    Most basic-skills tests don't allow calculators - I can't recall whether Praxis is one of these, but it would be surprising if it isn't. Some tests downplay some of these topics in order to include something else, such as test-score interpretation. And a given basic-skills test like Praxis Core math comes in multiple versions, none of which by itself covers all the topics because, to be that encyclopedic, it would have to include rather more than a measly 50 to 100 questions.

    I can suggest some helpful resources, if you like.
     
  4. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Sep 27, 2019

    Things could have changed, but when my son took this test, calculators were not allowed.
     
  5. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Sep 27, 2019

    I hedge like I breathe, vickilyn. In addition, I'm aware of cases - not many, admittedly - in which a test taker with documented dyscalculia or something like it has successfully petitioned to be allowed a calculator for a test that normally forbids use of one.
     
  6. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Sep 27, 2019

    Interesting, because my son has a 504 Plan that requires that he be allowed a calculator for exactly that diagnosis, and it wasn't enough to change their no calculator rule. Could I have contested it and sent it to court, maybe, but when the clock is ticking to get into the teaching program, they hold the upper hand.
     
  7. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    The case with which I'm best acquainted didn't involve Praxis, and the chances are good that legal action had paved the way.
     
  8. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Sep 27, 2019

    Not a criticism, trust me. Had I had the time and money, I would have pursued it. Had my son not put off taking the test until time was short that would have possibly changed things as well. Dyscalculia is better known today than in was even 10 years ago, so I would hope that those with that diagnosis would, indeed, be able to prevail for calculator use. After the fourth attempt, he squeaked by, so I honestly hadn't thought of it until the post on this thread. :relieved:
     

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