Is there a curriculum or pacing guide I can follow?

Discussion in 'Art Teachers' started by allyv, Jan 13, 2015.

  1. allyv

    allyv Rookie

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    Jan 13, 2015

    So for a very long time I was preparing to teach elementary art and I practiced a LOT for it too. I worked at a lot of different after school places to practice because I don't have a degree in Education but in art.

    I was offered a position to teach middle school art and I took it because I really need it! I couldn't turn it down :/ However, it's at a charter school and they told me I have complete freedom with my curriculum and lesson planning, but, considering my lack of experience with the middle school grades, I am having a lot of trouble coming up with something, and coming up fast! I started this week, and I have a few things, but as far as a fully developed curriculum that spans a whole year, um yeah, nada!

    So I was hoping someone out there would have something I can use as a guide for making my curriculum. I just want to look at something and see what other teachers with years of middle school experience have done. I would greatly appreciate any help!!!
     
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  3. Securis

    Securis Cohort

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    Jan 14, 2015

    What are your resources? By that, I mean materials, space, technology, anything you think might be an asset.

    Digital photography might be an easy unit to plan for. Anything digital is easily self contained and makes no mess.

    Non-western art is always fun. (Native American, Native Australian, Oceanic, Japanese, Indian, etc.) Lots to explore.

    Fundamental concepts like elements and principles can be applied to just about anything.

    Somethings depend on how messy you can get or how large you can go.

    Public art is fun. Maybe there's a green space somewhere nearby that could use a student designed sculpture or sculpture garden. Community involvement makes principals look good and they like that. And the lessons involved are way more than just how to make art.

    Making prints. There are a variety of methods for doing it that would be appropriate for middle school.

    Some foreign consulates, like the Japanese consulate, have programs where they will send out cultural ambassadors to demonstrate and discuss their culture. Some states have a list of artists in residence that will come visit. I think there is some times a $$$ cost to these things.

    I'll keep thinking.
     
  4. allyv

    allyv Rookie

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    Jan 15, 2015

    Thanks! :)

    I think, thanks to the internet, I have some pretty good resources. I also bought a book off amazon today and I am waiting for it to come in.

    I actually do have a lot of lesson plans, mostly elementary though, but I am sure I can tweak those for middle schoolers easily. However, it's more of the pace at which I should follow that I am confused about. Like, at the moment, I am doing elements and principles of art and then after I am planning to move onto historical artists and styles and after that contemporary artists and styles. I'm not sure if that's the right flow but this is my first year so I have to wing it haha. I hope to start public art next year though!
     
  5. Securis

    Securis Cohort

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    Jan 15, 2015

    Pacing is a blend of setting deadlines and assessing student progress. For instance, I usually give a day or two for introducing concepts. And then a week, week and a half to complete art pieces. Then a day for critique and display. Ultimately, you're looking at two weeks per art piece/lesson.
     
  6. ArtTeacher01

    ArtTeacher01 Rookie

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    Jan 18, 2015

    I was thinking, do you have access to a kiln? Clay is always vey popular with all students...
     
  7. allyv

    allyv Rookie

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    Jan 27, 2015

    Securis, I can definitely see that is true! I think that with experience, I will be able to develop my own pacing guide, but it's gonna be rough road until then >.<

    ArtTeacher01, I don't think so. I haven't asked, but I sure do hope we do have one. I love clay!
     
  8. ms.irene

    ms.irene Connoisseur

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    Jan 28, 2015

    Allyv, do you have state standards for art you can refer to? They can be a kind of road map for how much you should be able to cover in a year. I also have complete freedom and no set curriculum/map for my English class and I love the freedom but also feel somewhat overwhelmed by all the possibilities. Going back to the standards helps me focus.
     
  9. ArtTeacher01

    ArtTeacher01 Rookie

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    Jan 28, 2015

    I think you'll also find that different students will work at different paces. You'll have some that will want to work for a day or two and call their art done. Others could spend two straight weeks working diligently...

    I try to plan my lessons to give time to students who need it, while providing extension activities for students who do not...

    Adam
     

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