Is she wanting attention or is it for real?

Discussion in 'General Education Archives' started by Christine3, Feb 22, 2007.

  1. Christine3

    Christine3 Cohort

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    Feb 22, 2007

    I have one little girl that is very disruptive in my class this year. I can't seem to tell if she is just wanting attention or its for real. She calls out answers/interrupts when another child is answering a question (should I ignore this or...?), cannot start a task without me telling her to begin, annoyance to the other students,physically aggressive ex) touches others,pulls and can't just keep her hands to herself while in her seat. She is always up and around the class when I am beginning a lesson. Sometimes, I think that she takes me as a joke and thinks its funny when she does something wrong. She is a very sweet girl, but just has tons of energy to burn. I use her to run my errands and she loves it! Again, she demands so much attention from me and even craves negative attention...Do you think she is "faking"? Any advice on how to tell would be great!
    THANKS!
     
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  3. Tbelle1035

    Tbelle1035 Cohort

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    Feb 22, 2007

    I don't think she is faking from what you've said. There could be a number of things causing this behavior. ADD, ADHD, lacks attention at home or she may rule the roost at home. In any case, she needs someone to show her how to behave and who's in charge.

    She is going to take a lot of your time, but needs to be taught acceptable behavior. You can do this by giving her choices...You can work quietly at your table or move to a spot where you won't bother anyone, etc.

    And set clear limits: Keep your hands and feet to yourself. No exceptions or...(state consequence).

    Good luck with this one, no matter what the cause of her behaviors, she will be a challenge!
     
  4. Christine3

    Christine3 Cohort

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    Feb 23, 2007

    Okay. Thanks for your input! I think that she may 'rule the roost at home.' (from what I can tell) I agree with sitting her down and talking about how to behave right. When she calls out should I ignore her or say something?
     
  5. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Feb 23, 2007

    She needs a behavior mod system set up and quickly. She needs to see the consequences of her actions and to know where the lines are drawn.
     
  6. Tbelle1035

    Tbelle1035 Cohort

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    Feb 23, 2007

    I agree with Upsadaisy about a behavior mod. system. I would pick 3target behaviors to work on. If you can draw mom into it and let her provide the incentive at the end of the week, all the better. Give her chances to earn stickers (or check marks, points whatever) twice a day. from the beginning of the day until lunch time and then lunch time to dismissal. Breaks it up for her, it's hard to be good all day!

    There are some nice charts you can run off for free. Just go to freebehaviorcharts.com

    Good luck!
     
  7. Christine3

    Christine3 Cohort

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    Feb 24, 2007

    Okay! Thanks for your advice on this, I really appreciate it. I am going to pick 3 targets to work on... calling out is going to be one.
    Yeah I agree it is hard to be good all day!

    That website has some cute ideas too...
     
  8. ThinkOutLoud

    ThinkOutLoud Rookie

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    Feb 24, 2007

    Yep, I agree with Tbelle too, a separate behaviour system/chart should work wonders for this little girl. I've used this type of thing in the past and gotten some amazing results ...and quickly.
    All the best, would be interested to know how things turn out for you ;) Keep us posted!
     
  9. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Feb 24, 2007

    It is better to err on the side of caution and ask for an in-house informal observation, so that she gets the appropriate help or approach that she needs (either way).

    Other tips (adding to the ones already listed):
    Use repetitive key carrier phrases to help her learn how to identify misbehavior, catch it, and change it. For ex, use "Is your name Suzie?" when she interrupts Suzie's answer. "What are we supposed to be doing?" This phrase can help her identify that she already knows what to do and she is in error for not doing it and at the same time still provide prompts as she still needs. I have a student that thinks that because he stopped his tempermental behaviors that he is no longer arguing. He really doesn't recognize the difference. I have to say "Are you arguing or accepting?" I might have to say it twice, but then it shuts him down every time. By using the same words each time, you are teaching them to recognize and target a certain behavior. It takes a little practice, but they soon learn the pattern.

    Not everyone agrees, but I tend to apply a bootcamp philosophy (tear 'em down and build 'em back up). It isn't as bad as it sounds. No humilaition or yelling is needed. Basically be extra firm, stay on top of stuff, provide clear structure, and consistently give the same firm consequence every time (preferably an immediate one). Do not argue or accept inappropriate behavior. Then the second they show ANY improvement, be there to praise them as much as you can ongoing. Guide, remind, and praise. Repeat parts of the cycle as needed. They feel better when things go smoother and they like positive approval and achieved success. Many students act out of frustration or not having been taught the proper tools for correcting misbehavior. I have a 3 punch system too. The reward is school power bucks at the end of the day and if all three are punched they get a "Wow" certificate to show their parents.

    Sometimes I slightly separate off task students from the crowd (too distracting). They stay within communication and social range (less isolated/might still be disruptive) but gives them a little space that isn't as visually distracting and promotes better attention. This isn't a permanent setting. I only use in identified repetitive problem subjects/situations or in an isolated event when the child is struggling. I use a helpful tone to let them know it is temporary and you are doing it to help them pay attention better. I insist. It is resisted at first, but after a while, my students no longer see it as a negative thing especially when I'm over there giving them a lot of positive attention.
     
  10. Christine3

    Christine3 Cohort

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    Feb 26, 2007


    Thank you for your time on writing all of that advice!
     

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