Is it that big of a deal to modify a test

Discussion in 'General Education' started by rookieABC123, Oct 6, 2014.

  1. rookieABC123

    rookieABC123 Comrade

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2007
    Messages:
    279
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 6, 2014

    As a result of a spec. Ed meeting we had with our principal, he sent out an email letting teachers know that they may need to give less work, less writing, and orally read tests if needed. He also stated that teachers need to give our spec ed students typed modified tests. Of course this all depends on the students needs and what it states in their IEPs.
    The workload in some of our science and social studies is over the top. I couldn't pass some do the science tests myself even if I could use my book! Some of the tests given were hand written or had answers blackened out on them. We felt this was wrong and could embarrass a student that was getting that test.
    Teachers were p****d about the email. But why? I know why because this causes them to have to do more work. They have to go back and re-type a new version of their test. Is this too much to ask? I'm not being a smart ass here. I want other opinions. On top of everything else, the spec ed teachers in our building are now the bad guys. Everyone seems to hate us just because we are trying to do what's right for our students!!!!!:mad::mad::mad:
     
  2.  
  3. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2007
    Messages:
    2,680
    Likes Received:
    450

    Oct 6, 2014

    When the teacher was passing out the test, (handwritten or with blacked out answers), did it look visibly different from the other tests? I completely agree that if the IEP states modified tests then it must be done, but I don't know if it would be a huge deal if it was hand written vs typed (as long as it was legible).

    My district doesn't use less answer choices on a test as a modification, so I don't have any personal experience with this.
     
  4. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2013
    Messages:
    4,252
    Likes Received:
    791

    Oct 6, 2014

    During my SPED days, if a student on my caseload needed a test modified, I did it myself. That way, it was an appropriate modification for the student. The classroom teacher would email me their original test, and I'd make the modifications. For the most part, it was a quick modification, and truthfully, I did it quicker and more effectively than the classroom teacher would have done, anyway.

    For what it's worth, as a classroom teacher, I'd be very offended if somebody came to me and told me to modify a test for a certain student, I did it, and then told me that my modifications weren't good enough. If you expect a test to be completely retyped for your student, you should do it yourself.
     
  5. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2010
    Messages:
    4,330
    Likes Received:
    566

    Oct 6, 2014

    In some cases, YES, it is a lot more work. For me though, it is the principle of it all. Actual modifications, where a student gets a much easier version of the test, totally rubs me the wrong way. Why in the world should you get 10th grade credit for doing fourth grade work? If you cannot handle the rigor of the course, then you really should be in an alternate "diploma" pathway.

    Saving a test in Word so a student can have a computer read it aloud to him, is perfectly fine. Giving a student only three answer choices instead of five because he has a better chance of guessing it correctly, is not.

    I will share with you what I told one sped teacher years ago... She told me it was "easy" to make up a new test and that it "wouldn't take much time at all." I told her she was welcome to make it herself then and bring it by me for approval. If it is so easy and quick to do, she shouldn't have any problem doing it, right?

    Thankfully at the high school level we don't see modifications on IEPs like this unless a child is super low performing. He would be on an alternate path for graduation anyhow. But I sure do get plenty of requests from parents, ESL and sped teachers!
     
  6. Linzi

    Linzi Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2013
    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 6, 2014

    It is a pain in the butt to have to do modified stuff- especially when the student has modified everything- assignments, tests, quizzes, etc. etc. I know in my school math and english has co-teachers, but we science and social studies teachers have no support for things like this.

    In our school, if a student has modified tests we circle the questions they should answer, not retype the whole test. The types of modifications that different students will need may be different, so it is easier to black out answers or shorten the test without doing the original and printing it out. Most of the time they have modified testing, they are taking their tests in a separate setting anyway so it shouldn't cause embarrassment.

    We want what is best for our students too, but between parent contacts, lesson plans, creating new materials, all the paperwork and everything else, it really could be the straw to break the camels back to ask teachers to take all that time to recreate all the tests and quizzes and assignments rather than circle the questions or black out answers on their individual assessments. We science and social studies teachers are stretched thin as it is with all the same students that are in the inclusion math/english classes without any of the support or help.

    I know this probably isn't what you were hoping to hear. :sorry:
     
  7. rookieABC123

    rookieABC123 Comrade

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2007
    Messages:
    279
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 6, 2014

    I don't mind modifying any test myself. I would be willing to do that on top of my 3 co-taught classes and my three other classes that I have to prepare for; plus keep track and do paperwork for the 20 students on my caseload. Some of the tests are not handwritten neatly and they looked very different from what the other students tests looked like. I don't like to modify tests in subjects that I know nothing about such as science, which is pretty advanced at the middle school level. I don't see anything wrong with that.
     
  8. geoteacher

    geoteacher Habitué

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2011
    Messages:
    981
    Likes Received:
    201

    Oct 6, 2014

    I do make modifications for my students with IEPs. Common modifications include giving two (rather than three) distracters for multiple choice items, providing a word bank for fill-in answers, or giving the student fewer short answer questions. All of my students receive the same study guide before the test; the special ed teacher also sees a copy of the test so that she knows what will be emphasized. I do not read tests to students as that would be distracting to the regular ed population. The special ed teacher makes this modification as needed.

    If I feel the rigor of the test is compromised by the modifications, I will enter a notation that the grade is a modified one. I can do this for one test or for the entire quarter's grade. This designation tells parents or anyone else who may see the report card that the work load was reduced.
     
  9. rookieABC123

    rookieABC123 Comrade

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2007
    Messages:
    279
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 6, 2014

    I like the idea of circling the items on the test. I'm truly not trying to create more work for others but only looking out for my students that have true reading disabilities and truly need modifications. Thank you for your response!
     
  10. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2013
    Messages:
    3,835
    Likes Received:
    1,442

    Oct 6, 2014

    I don't think any of those things are unreasonable. However, some accommodations can create a lot of additional work for teachers. For example, having students repeat directions to you or checking in with them regarding their behavior every __ minutes. These accommodations are much easier with a small group than with a whole class of 30+ kids. I have a lot of kids with IEP lesson modifications, and while none are a big deal individually, collectively, they create tons of extra work for me. Each kid has separate information that I'm supposed to follow. I could easily just take care of my SPED kids, but I have others I'm supposed to be teaching too.

    I just read aloud everything to the whole class, because a lot of my kids need this accommodation. However, it can be tough with so many students needing this, because they all work at different paces. There's always someone frustrated because I'm reading too fast/slow, and I can't read at everyone's individual pace.
     
  11. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2010
    Messages:
    3,014
    Likes Received:
    473

    Oct 6, 2014

    Spec. Ed teachers are thankless heroes. They stand up for students all the time, but often get a lot of problems from some difficult teachers. Do what is best for the students (as it sounds like you are doing), but the day Spec. Ed teachers don't have complaints flying at them will be a day that pigs fly.
     
  12. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2011
    Messages:
    3,224
    Likes Received:
    147

    Oct 7, 2014

    Our sped teachers do any modifications necessary. Many times it's handwritten or with things blacked out.

    A common one I see is fewer choices. I hate it. I hate that a kid who takes a multiple choice quiz with only two answer options then also has the passage with the answer in it read to him or her. Then people wonder why the sped student who hasn't ever read the book has the highest grade in the class.
     
  13. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2005
    Messages:
    13,843
    Likes Received:
    1,678

    Oct 7, 2014

    I modify the tests that I give. I do all of my tests in Word, so it is easy to copy the test and then change numbers, change the wording of questions. I try, as much as humanly possible, to make the modified test look as much like the non-modified one as possible so that, as a quick glance, the test doesn't look different. For my students, this has been important--for their self-confidence and for their willingness to positively approach the task.

    On our report cards, we include a statement for our identified students that indicates that they are working on modified expectations--the grade level(s) they are working on in each subject are outlined in the IEP, which parents have a copy of.
     
  14. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2010
    Messages:
    4,330
    Likes Received:
    566

    Oct 7, 2014

    Another one I hate is word banks with only the words used available. For instance, if I have a ten question quiz, I'll often have 15 different words in the word bank. I've had a sped teacher tell me to reduce the word bank to only the words used. This to me screams "he doesn't know the information! Make it so he can use process of elimination instead of actually learning!"

    We don't have the option of noting that work was modified. IF a student has modifications, it appears as though he did the same work as everyone else.
     
  15. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2009
    Messages:
    3,248
    Likes Received:
    454

    Oct 7, 2014

    The SPED teachers where I work often forget how many students we have. This year, I teach 180 students. I have three preps. Mixed in all of that, I have more than 20 students with various modifications and accommodations. I have to keep up with a of their documentation, and if they are 504, IEP, or LEP. In one class, I may have four students who need the test modified 4 different ways, in addition to needing to record myself reading the test aloud if needed. And don't even get me started on the paperwork involved with a behavior plan! With only 50 minutes of planning a day, if I typed a separate test for each student who needed it modified, I would literally accomplish nothing else.
     
  16. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2008
    Messages:
    4,347
    Likes Received:
    985

    Oct 7, 2014

    I'm a sped teacher but I completely understand why it would be difficult for the gen ed teacher to modify (some) tests. I would think the sped teacher would have a better understanding of what modifications were needed so if they could get the test ahead of time they could change some things so that it would be appropriate for certain students. Requiring the gen ed teacher to make up 10 or more different versions is a lot to ask. I also don't think any test should be hand written or anything scribbled out. That might be distracting for any student let alone a sped student who has difficulties in reading. I've been a gen ed teacher with a sped teacher coming in to my classroom so I've seen it from both ends. The sped teacher really really has to step up sometimes and not dump everything on the teacher who has 150+ students. That's just the way I see it having been on both sides.
     
  17. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2009
    Messages:
    3,248
    Likes Received:
    454

    Oct 7, 2014

    Exactly! I think my answer is that it's not that big of a deal to modify "a" test, but it may be a huge deal to modify the number of tests for the number of students a teacher teaches.
     
  18. SpecialPreskoo

    SpecialPreskoo Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2002
    Messages:
    4,991
    Likes Received:
    378

    Oct 7, 2014

    Here's my 2 cents to those that don't like the modification idea...

    Be thankful you didn't need your tests modified. Be thankful your teachers didn't resent having to help you. Be thankful it isn't your child that needs help now.
     
  19. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2009
    Messages:
    3,248
    Likes Received:
    454

    Oct 7, 2014

    I don't resent modifying anything for a student that needs it, or helping any student in any way that they need. I do sometimes resent when the SPED department insists that I must not be modifying and accommodating enough because the kids do not make A's on everything. I also resent when my judgement in my classroom is questioned because I don't do something exactly the same way as everyone else. I also resent that the district office has cut teacher positions again and that I have more students than I can keep up with and three preps, meaning I sometimes have as many as 14 individual tests to modify according to each child's needs. So while I don't resent doing that, I would resent being told to type a different test for each child. If the IEP holder does not approve of the way I modify something then they should offer to make those modifications instead of criticizing what I am working hard to do.
     
  20. SpecialPreskoo

    SpecialPreskoo Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2002
    Messages:
    4,991
    Likes Received:
    378

    Oct 7, 2014

    Gee... the goal isn't to modify the heck out of it to get an A. LOL They are wrong there.
     
  21. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2011
    Messages:
    5,770
    Likes Received:
    1,000

    Oct 7, 2014

    Our SPED teachers are SUPER understanding. I teach about 180-200 students. On top of all of the other things I do, just to keep the other students caught up, having to make modifications on my own for every single SPED student (we have a lot) would be impossible.

    I simply give our SPED teacher the test and she does it for us. I do my best to help out whenever necessary.

    As for modifications, whenever we modify instruction for a particular student, we have to add a comment into the grades that basically means that the student is NOT meeting standards and NOT on graduation track. As long as their parents understand that, I am fine with whatever modifications a student needs.
     
  22. Go Blue!

    Go Blue! Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2011
    Messages:
    1,949
    Likes Received:
    16

    Oct 7, 2014

    Where have you been all my life?


    OP, yes, modifying a test can be a hassle especially when the student is nowhere near grade level and basically needs their own test.
     
  23. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2011
    Messages:
    3,224
    Likes Received:
    147

    Oct 7, 2014

    I resent when they modify it to the point where the kid doesn't have to do anything. You're already making it only two choices for a multiple choice question. Then they read them the passage with the answer it (three sentences at most). Then if they somehow still miss it, they get to correct it for half credit. We've had parents complain they don't want their kids getting that much help. They aren't learning that way. Our kids aren't that low. They don't need that much help.

    Our sped teacher's idea of a difficult vocabulary quiz is allowing them to use their vocabulary book but not telling them what page number the answer is on (four pages per section). Her kids all got 100%. None of the regular ed kids did. Many kids got A's but no perfects.

    I'm all for modification as needed. But there's a point where it's just too much.
     
  24. Go Blue!

    Go Blue! Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2011
    Messages:
    1,949
    Likes Received:
    16

    Oct 7, 2014

    Some students have to have their tests completely modified and reworked just to get a passing grade. So, just like these students can't keep up in class - even when asked to do the bare minimum - they can't complete a test that is anything like their peers in my class.

    I teach social studies so I have a lot of kids that take SPED/self-contained math and English classes but then come to me for history. These kids do not have the skills to take a regular English class, but apparently they have the skills to take a regular history class. At my school, all of the HS history classes are mixed grades and mixed abilities (unlike our English classes which are single grades and/or abilities). Some cannot even do well on an open-book, open-note test; so the test I give them has to be easy as possible.
     
  25. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2011
    Messages:
    5,862
    Likes Received:
    734

    Oct 7, 2014

    We don't modify in for mild/moderate in my state, since this puts kids on a non-diploma track, so its a non issue for me. However, in all my student teaching/field assignments in OH, the sped teacher modified tests and assignments. I often modified tests/assignments as a ST, and I always just used white out or blacked out things- it's a complete waste of time to type an entire test, imo. When I first moved here, I kept asking the teachers if they wanted help with modifying tests and they all kept looking at me like I had 3 heads, and I finally figured out it's just not done here. In college we learned that a student should have modifications to the point where if they put in their best effort, they should be able to earn a "C." If they're getting an "A" or "B" on modified tests, next time they need less modifications. I think this makes sense.
     
  26. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2006
    Messages:
    7,075
    Likes Received:
    14

    Oct 7, 2014

    Modified tests have not been common accommodations in any of the districts I worked in. (In my NC district it was next to impossible to get it. In my school of 450 students we had ONE child with a modified test in the 6 years I was there.)

    Modified assignments have been common accommodations.

    I don't typically modify my test for my sped kids since it isn't on their IEP. They have to take our state and district tests without accommodations, so they need to take my test without them as well. I feel that by modifying I would be hurting them in the long run. They need to build their stamina and mental fortitude for the state/district tests. I equate it to preparing for a marathon but only running a mile at a time in practice.

    If I did have a student with test modifications, I would be one who would scratch out/add/change things on the regular test with a pen. For me I copy and never think about those things until I pass them out. I had a vision impaired student who needed things enlarged. Darned if I didn't forget nearly every singe time all year long. And this was for regular assignments as well. Anyway that is an area that I suck at!
     
  27. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2010
    Messages:
    4,330
    Likes Received:
    566

    Oct 7, 2014

    How exactly is it more embarrassing for a student to get a test with questions circled or answer choices blacked out than it is to have separate setting or read aloud? Are a student's classmates that odd that they will notice a blacked out test handed directly to a child but NOT notice the same child leave the room for a test?
     
  28. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Messages:
    14,468
    Likes Received:
    2,485

    Oct 7, 2014

    The special ed teachers at my school never help modify tests and assignments in my content area. It can be very difficult to modify a test or assignment for a kid in this content area because it often negates the entire purpose of the course. Like, the objective may be that the student read aloud in the target language using correct pronunciation, but the student requires that everything be read aloud to him. Or perhaps the objective is that the student writes in the target language at a novice high level, but the student is unable to write and does not have to learn vocabulary. There never seems to be any sort of exception for this type of thing, either. How am I supposed to work with that?
     
  29. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2011
    Messages:
    2,096
    Likes Received:
    1

    Oct 7, 2014

    I teach special ed and I think some of the modifications people are describing here are outrageous. My special ed students take the same exact tests as the general education students just as they do on the state exam. Some of the common modifications are time and a half (or double) time, questions and directions read and re-read (only for math), separate location with less students and a scribe. These are really the only ones I've come across. I think it's fair and really requires no extra work.
     
  30. GemStone

    GemStone Habitué

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2011
    Messages:
    819
    Likes Received:
    166

    Oct 7, 2014

    Accommodations and modifications are two separate things. Accommodations allow students to access the curriculum, by providing human readers, scribes, shortened or rephrased test questions/answers. The content is not changed.

    Modifications change the content a student learns and tests on. The curriculum is changed at this point and the student is not on a diploma track.

    Qbout accommodations: Why shouldn't a student who has a disability in phonics NOT have a test read to them in history? What is the purpose of the history test - to test knowledge or phonics? Why shouldn't a child who struggles with processing information have one less distractor on a multiple choice question? Why should a child with issues with focus have to use a messy, hand-written, marked up test?

    Some people question the fairness of accommodations and modifications but need to remember that the IEP rules all. It's a legally binding document that must be followed, no matter who is doing the work on the test.
     
  31. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2010
    Messages:
    4,330
    Likes Received:
    566

    Oct 7, 2014

    As I said before, I disagree with limiting the number of answer choices. I give multiple choice tests because they are easy for me to grade and because it helps prepare the students for the final exam. My expectation is that students know the content well enough to view these questions as fill in the blank, and not rely on lucky guesses. If a student cannot recall the information on his own, then he doesn't truly know it. If a student with a processing disorder is distracted or has difficulty processing several options, I would assume that his sped caseworker would be thrilled if I gave him a fill-in-the blank test instead.

    Unfortunately, whether it is legal or not, students do get modifications at my school and still remain on a diploma track. This is especially true for ESL students. Sped teachers will often ask for them for sped students, but modifications aren't specifically listed on the IEPs.
     
  32. comaba

    comaba Cohort

    Joined:
    May 21, 2011
    Messages:
    624
    Likes Received:
    1

    Oct 7, 2014

    First, I think it's truly unfortunate that input from ALL teachers wasn't considered before making a decision like this.

    Second, I do think it's expecting too much. If you want to do what's right for your students, then you should provide the accommodations. After all, you're the expert on their needs and what accommodations they require.
    I'm sure those teachers who get no support for their special ed students don't want to modify the tests either. If they're on your caseload, you should have a better idea of what needs to be changed on their tests. It seems that you're expecting science teachers to know more about the needs of the special ed student than you know about science.
    But it does create more work for others.

    I'm not against accommodations. I do my own for all my tests, classwork, and homework without any resentment and without being asked. However, I would be very resentful if I received an email like that from my principal.
     
  33. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2009
    Messages:
    3,248
    Likes Received:
    454

    Oct 8, 2014

    In our districts students who receive modifications are on a standard diploma track. In fact, only a very few students are not on a diploma track, and that number gets smaller each year.

    I know at my school, our science, social studies, etc. teachers are responsible for teaching the Common Core standards in literacy, and their professional evaluation is tied to the literacy scores of their students. So in that case, reading is a very big part of the history curriculum.
     
  34. a2z

    a2z Maven

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Messages:
    5,738
    Likes Received:
    1,657

    Oct 8, 2014

    You do know that is illegal if the student is in a school talking federal money, MissCeliaB. IDEA is rather clear about this. Now, I'm not saying it is common, but other schools are better at hiding it by creating classes where what is done in the one class is all modified but also has kids without disabilities in it. Since everyone in the class is doing the same thing. It is usually hidden behind the teacher having one section of this class and other sections of higher level classes in the same subject.

    The fact that your school does it out in the open makes it easier for that one parent who finally does know better to report.
     
  35. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2009
    Messages:
    3,248
    Likes Received:
    454

    Oct 8, 2014

    It's not illegal. It's the way things are done in this state. The students are in inclusion classes in the regular curriculum, but they get modified assignments, test, etc. They are still on the diploma track. Louisiana is doing away with all of the non-diploma tracks except for the very lowest one, so we have to make sure all students are meeting the curriculum standards.
     
  36. a2z

    a2z Maven

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Messages:
    5,738
    Likes Received:
    1,657

    Oct 8, 2014

    Maybe according to Louisiana it is not illegal, but according to IDEA, modifying a student's curriculum (which includes tests), removes them from the diploma track regardless of where their behind is placed.

    Now, accommodations are a completely different thing. Any special education student can have accommodations without jeopardizing the diploma track. So, if you are confusing modification and accommodations, I can see how it would not be illegal.
     
  37. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2010
    Messages:
    4,330
    Likes Received:
    566

    Oct 8, 2014

    a2Z, can you help me with this? Where exactly would I find information like this that could help support my decisions in my classroom? I would love to see where it is stated that modified curriculum= non-diploma track. Next year it is expected that I will have several students who will come with ESL modifications yet will remain on the diploma track.
     
  38. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2011
    Messages:
    3,224
    Likes Received:
    147

    Oct 8, 2014

    Ditto.
     
  39. a2z

    a2z Maven

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Messages:
    5,738
    Likes Received:
    1,657

    Oct 8, 2014

    2nd,
    I can't find the reference. I've learned most by reading IDEA and Wrights Law site was a big help. However, it may be true that the law has now allowed states to determine if they will issue regular diplomas even if the curriculum was modified for the student.

    I apologize to all. I may be wrong about the diploma. At one point modified curriculum was not allowed to give a regular diploma because the modified curriculum didn't meet state standards for credit.

    Again, I apologize.
     
  40. ku_alum

    ku_alum Aficionado

    Joined:
    May 24, 2008
    Messages:
    3,513
    Likes Received:
    14

    Oct 8, 2014

    I didn't read through the entire thread because I am short on time ... but I always thought it was the job of the sped dept to make the modifications. ??
     
  41. donziejo

    donziejo Devotee

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2009
    Messages:
    1,091
    Likes Received:
    1

    Oct 8, 2014

    Sometimes I think I use to be a nice person until I became a sped teacher. LOL. I have to work with different grade levels and many different teachers...each have their own idea of what sped should be. Some resent sped students, some love them, some hate all sped teachers, some love us.... it goes on and on.

    I don't play. I'm an advocate and I follow the IEP. If my student has retest and redo failed tests and assignements on his/her IEP that's what happens. If a teacher doesn't want to modify a test I do it (and I don't clear it with the teacher) I grade the test, and make sure the test clearly states the accommodations and or modifications used.
    I check and make sure the grade I've given is recorded. My job is to make sure our student has every opportunity to learn. I want to know what I need to reteach so I like to have my students test in the gen ed classroom first. A lot of my students often do well on tests(documentation for future IEPs) however, assignments like daily work often need extended time and time in my room for reteaching. If our students fail a test or get below a 70 percent I will retest. Sometimes the gen ed teacher and I will take an average of the two tests...it's totally depends on the individual student.

    As for the original OP, I'm sorry other's are being ugly to you:(
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. vickilyn,
  2. MrsC,
  3. Backroads
Total: 389 (members: 6, guests: 349, robots: 34)
test