is it rude...

Discussion in 'General Education' started by HufflePuff, Sep 20, 2009.

  1. HufflePuff

    HufflePuff Cohort

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2007
    Messages:
    537
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 20, 2009

    Last year I worked at School A for the first half of the year as a leave replacement...teacher came back and I was put on another replacement in School B.

    I was hired back this year at School A for the full year...the teacher I replaced moved down to a lower grade.

    Is it rude if I asked her if I could see her lesson plans for the second half of the year for last year? It would be super helpful for me, but I don't want her to think I am trying to take her work that she worked hard on.
     
  2.  
  3. Rebel1

    Rebel1 Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2008
    Messages:
    1,522
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 20, 2009

    NO! You're not being rude.
    You have to explain to her why you want it. If she is a TEAM:) PLAYER then she shouldn't even think of anything negative.
    It is going to help you, so it is something POSITIVE.:angel:
    Rebel1
     
  4. Proud2BATeacher

    Proud2BATeacher Phenom

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2005
    Messages:
    4,896
    Likes Received:
    5

    Sep 20, 2009

    It won't be rude to ask to see her lesson plans for the second half of the school year but don't be surprised if she says no... The lesson plans I write for someone else to read are in more detail than those I write for my eyes only, so it would really be of no help to anyone else. You have a half a year to become comfortable in the classroom try writing them yourself before asking (or at least write an outline of what you will be teaching) and ask her to look it over.
     
  5. Shanoo

    Shanoo Habitué

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2007
    Messages:
    761
    Likes Received:
    5

    Sep 20, 2009

    I don't think it would be rude at all. I would let her know that you're willing to share your things with her, if she needs it.
     
  6. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,956
    Likes Received:
    2,108

    Sep 20, 2009

    Why not reach out to your own grade level partners? I don't think it's necessarily rude to ask for someone else's plans, but I also think you got the job based on your own merit and you should 'do your thing'..

    I'm with Proud2BATeacher on this one- I write plans for me, I'm glad to share ideas and I'd certainly answer any questions/brainstorm with a new teacher, but I wouldn't be so excited to hand over all my plans...

    I do formally mentor new teachers often and even then, I plan WITH them, but not FOR them.

    Have confidence in yourself. I'm sure that you will be 'on a roll' in no time and won't need the second half of the year plans from anyone else but yourself.
     
  7. scmom

    scmom Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2007
    Messages:
    2,188
    Likes Received:
    1

    Sep 20, 2009

    I agree with czacza and Proud2BAteacher.
     
  8. Bloom

    Bloom Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2007
    Messages:
    157
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 20, 2009

    While I am not currently a teacher, just recently got certified. A few of the teachers in the grade level I taught in asked me for copies of my powerpoints and projects I had developed and implemented during my four months with them. (Actually left them with a whole reading folder project I developed on my own for their guided reading stations!) Not only was I proud to do so and assist them in future lessons on these topics, I was flattered. I would NEVER have a problem sharing my work with another teacher. The ultimate goal is to help the students! I would like to think that any teacher would be happy to share and help you in your development.
     
  9. Bloom

    Bloom Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2007
    Messages:
    157
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 20, 2009

    I meant to say "student taught" not taught! I was so proud to share my successes with the teachers when I left....made me feel like I contributed and was on the right track. Good luck!
     
  10. TeacherC

    TeacherC Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2005
    Messages:
    1,715
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 20, 2009

    I also agree with czacza and Proud- I think once you get to the 2nd half of the year you won't need the lesson plans because you'll know what directions you're going in!! If you really think that you need help, I would ask the other grade level teachers first!
     
  11. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2005
    Messages:
    5,279
    Likes Received:
    746

    Sep 20, 2009

    I think asking for the year's scope and sequence would be appropriate, but in my school, asking for lesson plans is not a popular move.
     
  12. Canadian Gal

    Canadian Gal Habitué

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2008
    Messages:
    801
    Likes Received:
    3

    Sep 20, 2009

    Since, in Canada, every lesson/year plan I make technically belongs to the division, I would definitely share with you in her shoes.
     
  13. MelissainGA

    MelissainGA Groupie

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2004
    Messages:
    1,233
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 20, 2009

    This year am in a new school but I was the only one on the team familiar with the administration. That being the case for the first couple of weeks the other teachers on my team asked if I would forward them my lesson plans so that they could become familiar with what she wanted as far as format. I didn't mind (I understood their dilemma of having a new admin. and not being totally sure), so I forwarded them the first couple of weeks and now they are fine with doing them on their own.
     
  14. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2005
    Messages:
    4,395
    Likes Received:
    7

    Sep 20, 2009

    I guess I am in the minority, but I would see it as rude. If not rude, at least lazy. Not that you are, OP, but that's how I would see it. I would feel like someone was trying to take advantage of me.

    Would I say that? No, of course not. But I would definitely defer the question and ask if there was something specific I could help that new teacher work on.
     
  15. scmom

    scmom Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2007
    Messages:
    2,188
    Likes Received:
    1

    Sep 20, 2009

    Bloom,

    As you gain experience you will find it all depends....I am more than happy to share with new teachers, teachers who I think may be struggling for one reason or the other or have personal obstacles. I am not happy to share with teachers I feel are lazy and take advantage of my hard work because they don't want to do the work themselves.

    Call me selfish, but I get really tired of enabling some other teachers not to put the thought and work into it I do. I know I should think of the kids first but I find these teachers will also present your work, games, powerpoints, etc. as there own. I guess I got tired of it...
     
  16. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2005
    Messages:
    4,395
    Likes Received:
    7

    Sep 20, 2009

    :yeahthat: scmom!
     
  17. Bloom

    Bloom Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2007
    Messages:
    157
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 20, 2009

    scmom....I see your point and agree. I know when I student taught, I spent HOURS perfecting my lessons, powerpoints, folder activities, etc. This took time away from my family and myself. Had the teachers that asked me for my materials been lazy or bad teachers, I may have been taken back a little...but I went into this profession, not for the money nor the glory, it was to benefit and help young children grow and learn. If I can help that process by sharing my work...so be it!

    I am new to the teaching profession...but even in my previous career as a paralegal/technology liason (10+ years), I did not have a problem sharing my work product. At the end of the day, the Firm did well and those who mattered knew who did the best work. I felt that it all worked out in the end and to my companies (clients, courts, etc.) benefit.

    I hope to always keep that in mind when I have been teaching for years. See your point, but still hope that I don't feel that way down the road....
     
  18. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2005
    Messages:
    4,395
    Likes Received:
    7

    Sep 20, 2009

    I think there is something to be said about sharing ideas, brainstorming, etc. But I do believe the original poster asked about received a copy of a semester's worth of LP. Ouch, if you ask me. Collaborate, share ideas, modify, but a copy of...hmm.
     
  19. Bloom

    Bloom Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2007
    Messages:
    157
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 20, 2009

    kcjo13...again, as I mentioned to scmom, I see your point and respect your position on the topic.

    In my mind, at the end of the day, the student gets taught and since I worked hard on the project/lesson, they get taught well! HA HA!

    It would take me more time to modify or safeguard my intellectual property than it would to say, here it is....take from it what you like! Whenever I take ideas from experienced teachers on the internet or websites I visit, I always tailor them to meet my needs and enhance the ideas and lessons to my liking. I see your point, just don't think that would be my position. ;)

    Also....sometimes these "lazy" teachers are just struggling with creativity....maybe my ideas will spark something in them they will take with them for the future and they will become better teachers. I just believe at the end of the day...it is all about the students. :love:
     
  20. HufflePuff

    HufflePuff Cohort

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2007
    Messages:
    537
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 20, 2009

    just to clarify...by no means would i copy her lessons. i simply want to see how much time she spent on certain things, chapters, writing pieces etc. since i wasn't there for the second half of the year. i know how much work i put into things and i would never steal someone elses hard work.
     
  21. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2005
    Messages:
    4,395
    Likes Received:
    7

    Sep 20, 2009

    That certainly sheds light on the situation HP. In your situation, I think it would depend on how you approach the situation. Bring your ideas to the table, and ask for feedback, rather than the other way around. Just a suggestion!
     
  22. krysmorgsu

    krysmorgsu Cohort

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2008
    Messages:
    685
    Likes Received:
    1

    Sep 20, 2009

    Interesting post. Personally, I wouldn't ask for her lesson plans, but ask if she had any great projects or activities she recommends doing, and ask for an outline of her curriculum, if you don't have one. When I student taught, my co-op wrote out a nice little outline of what chapters she did and the order for me. As you can see, lesson plans can be a touchy subject to some teachers, so you may want to stay clear of that. Personally, my lesson plans really don't say enough to be a help to someone. For example, the Methods part on mine might say:
    Practice: Ex. 6, pg. 9
    Activity: Declension races.
    The exercise is common sense enough: assign what goes with your lesson. The activity, while it does give a broad idea, isn't enough for someone to know exactly what I am doing or how.

    As an interesting side note with this, my department head this year decided to have us put our lesson plans in a personal folder on the shared teachers drive, rather than e-mail her or printing them out for her. She says it will keep her e-mail from getting cluttered, save them better, and that we can then view each other's to get ideas for lessons. No prob for me, since I'm the only one for my content area. Some of the other teachers aren't thrilled about, though. I needed to learn the new format for my lesson plans, so I asked my former mentor, who already uses the new format, if she minded if I viewed hers to check that I'm doing them properly. I figured that asking permission was more considerate than just viewing them, especially since some of the others had such a bad reaction to the new procedure.
     
  23. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2003
    Messages:
    6,699
    Likes Received:
    66

    Sep 20, 2009

    I wouldn't have a problem sharing my plans at all. We already share with our special ed teachers so they know what we are working on, and the librarian so she can plan activities to go with them. If you go to her and explain what you are wanting the plans for, she may just rather sit down with you and go over what's left. That might be easier for you, too.
     
  24. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2009
    Messages:
    3,278
    Likes Received:
    467

    Sep 20, 2009

    Ask to see her curriculum map.

    I know when I make things that other teachers who teach the same content I do could use, I just give them a copy. They do the same. That way, when I'm having one of those days when I'm feeling uninspired, I know I have that support!
     
  25. creativemonster

    creativemonster Comrade

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2006
    Messages:
    436
    Likes Received:
    111

    Sep 20, 2009

    I think there is a potential issue if you share students or you (meaning any teacher who uses another's lessons) are one grade below and there is the potential for students to have the lesson repeated the next year. if I know I won't get scooped in this manner I love sharing my lessons - most of which aren't original with me, but many I have tweaked to my own style.
    I think by asking, and making clear why you are asking, the teacher always has the right to say no. And should they say no, they owe us askers no explanation. Nor should it be considered rude for them to say no. We need to respect that they have their own reasons. Often people (myself included in this) mistake questions for demands. We (I) get pissed when people say no.

    Format of lesson plans and time taken to teach something are very important things to know. If they don't feel comfortable sharing their lessons, they might feel fine answering your questions.
     
  26. ambritlit

    ambritlit Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2007
    Messages:
    155
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 20, 2009

    I don't think it's rude at all for a new teacher to want to know how much time to plan on certain areas, etc. I am in this situation myself. It's my first year in a public school and the other teacher has been there for many years. I do not want to copy her lesson plans, but I would like to pace myself accordingly.

    It never occurred to me that she would think I was trying to get out of work by asking to see her lesson plans; however, she has not found time to share more than the bare minimum maybe a day or two before she gets ready to start it. I had already decided to just make a plan for myself and go with until someone says otherwise. Now I wonder if she thinks I was being lazy?

    At my old school (a private school), veteran teachers gave me everything I needed to make sure that I covered everything I needed to cover. They explained that kids and parents would talk if my class was easier than the other class, so we covered the same thing at the same times. After the first year, I had a little more leeway to modify the assignments, etc. but I still did units at the same time as the other teacher. They were far more concerned about the students' education than who got credit for a developing the lesson.
     
  27. krysmorgsu

    krysmorgsu Cohort

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2008
    Messages:
    685
    Likes Received:
    1

    Sep 20, 2009

    Now that I see what you really want, definately take MissCeliaB's advice. Ask her for her curriculum map, or if she doesn't have one written as such, if she could look over her old lesson plans and draw you up a simple curriculum map or give you copies of them so that you can do it yourself. This way the option is in her court, and she can decide based on her level of comfort and the amount of time she's willing to use. It's a diplomatic way of getting the outcome you want - a curriculum map. I don't think any teacher should take issue with that.
     
  28. EMonkey

    EMonkey Connoisseur

    Joined:
    May 10, 2008
    Messages:
    1,592
    Likes Received:
    4

    Sep 21, 2009

    I would advise talking to her because if someone wanted to know the time I spend on something the lesson plans would probably leave them guessing.
     
  29. jojo808

    jojo808 Comrade

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2004
    Messages:
    283
    Likes Received:
    1

    Sep 21, 2009

    At my school we turn in our curriculum maps for anyone to see. They are kept in a binder in the teacher work room. When I started a new job, It helped seeing what the teacher before me covered. I don't write lesson plans. I sketch out each day in my plan book, but wouldn't have LP to share if anyone asked!
     
  30. Shanoo

    Shanoo Habitué

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2007
    Messages:
    761
    Likes Received:
    5

    Sep 21, 2009

    I guess I just don't see the big deal. This year, one of my teaching partners went on mat leave. I took over her subject and they hired a long term sub to take mine (it's a long and complicated story). Anyway, at the end of last year, she showed up at my door with 5 binders FULL of lesson plans, handouts, etc. that she had photocopied for me. She sat down with me and went through exactly how she taught everything. I was so appreciative! By the same token, the sub taking my job asked to see my stuff and I let her. Why not?

    Does that mean I won't make changes to what my teaching partner has done, add my own things in, etc? No, but in my opinion, if someone has a method to teach a curricular strand that works, the kids find interesting and fun, then why not share it. If someone else asks me about something my teaching partner gave me, I'll surely give her credit, as I'm sure the sub will do for me.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. Backroads,
  2. Linguist92021,
  3. RainStorm
Total: 401 (members: 5, guests: 379, robots: 17)
test