Is it harder now for brand new teachers to get a job?

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by greenbay33, Jun 5, 2012.

  1. greenbay33

    greenbay33 Rookie

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    I am just wondering. I recently graduated with a degree in social studies. Now I know it's a very competitive and tough field to get in to, but I had people tell me, including a family member who is an elementary school teacher and reading specialist that it wouldn't be too hard getting a job since school districts were getting rid of people and hiring new teachers who could be paid less. I don't know if that was true, but it must not be. I've applied for 55 jobs in 5 states (with almost 35 going to schools in my home state. Anyway, are any other new teachers struggling to find jobs? Or am I one of the few who is. I'm just worried that maybe I'm not that good of a candidate and that I should just go back to school.
     
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  3. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    We hire at least one brand-new teacher every year. (That's probably not comforting considering the number of applicants, but we are not against hiring someone new). One of the advantages is we can train you in the programs we use, rather than try to convince a veteran teacher to do it another way.
     
  4. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    New teachers get hired here, but when I've been on the interview committee, it's been about finding the best candidate and not necessarily the cheapest one. You will have to out-interview teachers with experience. How have you prepared to do this? It can be done.
     
  5. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    I would focus on an LTS position. I got more interviews for tenure track positions than I could ever want but none of them turned into a job because no one wanted to give me that 1st job. I know I interviewed well because I was repeatedly told I did without ever asking. My point is, it's tough to get a full time job without that LTS on your resume. What they deemed my lack of experience came up in the majority of my interviews (they did not seem to count my 3 years of per diem subbing/student teaching). It's not impossible to get a job without, but I think it's more difficult.
     
  6. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    I have heard that teachers will be retiring and they will hire new teachers for over a decade. It is gradual and there is never going to be a mass exodus.

    I am only looking in a specific area (1.5 hour radius from my parents' house). I moved 750 miles for my first job and after many years, it is time to go home. I have cold-e-mailed principals and applied for over 100 jobs. I check 130 websites EVERY SINGLE DAY for job postings. If you are not aggressive enough, you don't have a chance.
     
  7. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    It is definitely harder in this economy to find a teaching job. More people are staying in the field (not retiring or leaving teaching for something else) and jobs are being cut.
     
  8. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    130 websites? I like the dedication but Isn't there a website that compiles listing in you area?
     
  9. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    I think it's harder. I'm up against teachers with 10-20 years experience, and I only had student teaching, subbing or long term subbing experience, for a little less than 2 years. How can I compete? :(
     
  10. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    The only new teacher I know at the moment is a math teacher. He'll be working at my husband's school in the fall.
     
  11. lowes48

    lowes48 Companion

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    Social Studies is very competitive! It took me three years, and adding another endorsement to get interviews. Most SS teaching positions here are attached to a coaching positions. Don't give up, but you may want to add an endorsement in another area.
     
  12. comaba

    comaba Cohort

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    My school hired 3 recent grads last year, and will probably hire 4-5 more this year. Those they've hired and the positions they've posted require endorsements in 2 content areas though.
     
  13. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    I'm looking in a semi-high population area where there can be 20-30 districts in a single county. Many of them are Applitrack consortiums. It is over 200 districts.

    I have the download for Firefox that checks sites for updates, but I don't trust it.
     
  14. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    If you decide to add an extra endorsement, I'd go with ELA since you are already social studies.

    I am certified in math and social studies (middle school), and I have found only ONE position with that combo. They are all math/science and social studies/language arts. It is very frustrating.
     
  15. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I'm not sure that it's harder for new teachers to get jobs. I think that it's harder for everyone to get jobs. It depends completely on where you are and what you can teach. For example, when it comes to the subject I teach (foreign language), it's a mixed bag. In my own district there are exactly three positions teaching this subject, and in a district with 300,000 students and 20,000 teachers, that's saying something. On the other hand, I can see right now at least 150 postings for open positions in the subject around the country just on one website. If I decide to leave my current position, or if the choice is made for me through budget cuts and program eliminations, I will have to move if I want to keep teaching this subject. It's just how it is, there's no getting around it. I can't magically create positions where there are none.

    I think that you should go for additional certifications/endorsements. Anything is better than nothing. I particularly recommend any core subject, along with TESL.
     
  16. BumbleB

    BumbleB Habitué

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    I was hired at the beginning of this school year as a new teacher with 0 years experience. I think my district hired 4-5 teachers with no experience as well. But teaching is still really competitive. For example, we have an intervention specialist position open, and there were over 160 applicants. And that's in special ed, which is typically considered a "needy" area. No matter what area you choose, you are going to be facing competition. There are a lot of people looking and not a lot of spaces left with all of the budget cuts.
     
  17. nyteacher29

    nyteacher29 Comrade

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    I agree, I do not know if experience is necessary high on the list (yes it does help but i do not think that much) For example, I was just offered a job with only one year experience and the PA told me I was up against others with multiple years of experience but it was my enthusiasm and detailed answers that got me the job. as another member said, practice your answers and be confident. Show that experience does not matter and that you are the best teacher candidate
     
  18. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    In my experience new teachers have the edge b/c they're cheaper and pretty much any school is absolutely down to the wire with budgets. When you're talking about someone with a lot of experience, you can hire two new teachers for less than one very experienced one. In my hometown area it's pretty well known that you're unhireable after you have so many years of experience so you had better stay put. I'd be shocked to hear of a teacher with 15-20 years experience landing a job in a public school. Now in my current district, they don't pay you for experience, so a brand new teacher and a 20 year veteran would cost the same. However, I don't think that way of doing salaries is common. Like another poster said, it's also common to think that new teachers are more "moldable" and will more likely conform to the ways of the school rather than being set in their own ways of doing things. Even in my school where experience doesn't matter in pay, they purposely hired a brand new teacher this year after the previous teacher was nonrenewed. The previous teacher was a 15 year veteran who absolutely refused to do anything aligned with school policy and only did what she believed was right. It created a pretty bad situation for everyone that had to work with her- when we were interviewing the new candidates, people were so put off from that experience that they wanted a new person.
     
  19. Special-t

    Special-t Enthusiast

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    I was a new teacher when I was recently hired (with 2 years of long term sub experience on my resume). We've recently hired 2 new science and math teachers. Its not because they are paid less, it's because they are motivated, from solid teaching programs, and their recent training gives them the edge of being innovative and aware of current teaching philosophies.
     
  20. fiddlefaddle

    fiddlefaddle Rookie

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    I think it can depend. My husband is social studies and was hired two years ago at his school with zero experience (aside from student teaching) and no other endorsements. Since then he has added a reading endorsement for an intervention class he teaches. ***I will say that I now feel so blessed that my husband landed a job. I never realized how competitive social studies positions were until I came to A to Z***

    In our district alone they are also known to hire equally as many new teachers as veteran teachers. So it does give me some hope as I start to apply for elementary teachers this year.
     
  21. tonysam

    tonysam Comrade

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    Nice, isn't it, that you go into debt for tens of thousands of dollars to embark on a "career" where the minute you are seen as too expensive as in being vested you are ditched.

    The fact is there are few or no teaching jobs regardless. Ed schools are STILL churning out graduates who will wind up subbing for years on end or working as teacher assistants for little over minimum wage and usually part-time, and for WHAT? And that's assuming they can even get those kind of "jobs."
     
  22. tonysam

    tonysam Comrade

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    And districts and even states like Louisiana are privatizing wholesale. NOT a good career choice.

    Anybody new to this field get as far away from it as possible.
     
  23. HOPE-fulTeacher

    HOPE-fulTeacher Comrade

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    Tonysam, I don't like being rude, but I honestly have to ask why you come and post on this forum. Every post of yours that I've read has been negative and has either bashed districts, administrators, and job seekers. Yes, there are often unwelcome school politics, but telling someone who has worked so hard to become a teacher and make a difference that they've made a poor career choice?? That is not at all helpful or encouraging! It makes me feel like it's not them who should reconsider their career choices.
     
  24. houseofbooks

    houseofbooks Companion

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    :yeahthat:
     
  25. Rainbowbird

    Rainbowbird Groupie

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    I think it's harder for everyone to get a job.

    But if anything, I think it is easier for new teachers as opposed to those with experience who will cost more. It does depend on the district. More affluent districts will have the money to pay more experienced candidates.
     
  26. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    it's been an excellent and rewarding career choice for me. And continues to be so.

    You have had some difficulties, tonysam, yet you seem unwilling to help yourself and instead choose to wallow and spread discontent. It's getting just a bit tiresome.:beatdeadhorse:
     
  27. TeachTN

    TeachTN Comrade

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    I too am a new grad who is endorsed in Social Studies primarily and attempting to find that first teaching job. I've had 4 interviews so far, but nothing came from them - in fact, I'm not sure why one of them interviewed me, I didn't have the endorsement to teach what they wanted!

    In my area, social studies and ELA have a higher supply than demand, so the principals have well over 200 candidates to choose from with each position. 3 of my 4 interviews I believe resulted from emailing the principals to express interest in working with their school and telling them what I believe I could bring to the community. I make sure to ask for the interview as well. The other interview called me based on meeting me at a job fair, even though I am not endorsed to teach that subject (head is still reeling from that one).

    I have been getting as many endorsements as possible, but all it takes for me is to take a Praxis exam. I prefer to teach in a middle school and opted to get an overall middle school endorsement, so I can teach any subject in middle school. Many middle schools in my area want that flexibility because one year they may need someone to teach ELA, next year it may be math, etc.

    I ended up going back to school and starting my Masters and for me it is working out well. I don't feel I had a lot of education exposure in my undergrad (since I had to focus on a content area), and I've learned a whole lot in just one week of grad school that I can utilize in my classroom.

    As others said, try to go for those long term subbing, or just general subbing overall. I have heard those in my area state that they were hired because they subbed in the school, or had a long term assignment. It is tough NOT to let this get to you, but be persistent, that teaching position is out there for you!
     
  28. Minpinxoxo

    Minpinxoxo Rookie

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    I have been trying to get a Social Studies position for two years. I admit that I havent been very agressive in my search. So that may be why it has taken me so long. But I do feel like I never have a chance because of my lack of experience. Everytime I find a job listing, it is either asking for experience or for a masters degree. I do have a friend that got hired in Social Studies right after graduating. But it was because his Dad was good friends with the principal of the school. So as the saying goes, "sometimes its not what you know, but who you know". I know that's not always the case, but having a "connection" can sometimes help.
    I was just told the other day that I would have a better chance of getting a job if I become certified to teach English. Some smaller schools will only hire 1 or 2 Social Studies teachers whereas in other subjects, like English or Math, they will hire more. At least that is what I've been told...
     
  29. greenbay33

    greenbay33 Rookie

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    Thank you.

    Thanks everybody for your posts. They have been somewhat helpful. I'm almost at the point of depression though. I had big plans to move out and have a job. Now i'm probably going to have to sub (which isn't bad, at all, just not what i planned. Or worse, work at Wal Mart or something like that for the rest of my life. I still feel i made a good career choice, but maybe i'm just not right to be a teacher.I mean I had issues with keeping kids on task for a whole 90 minute period and keeping them engaged. My CT also said i wasn't consistent with discipline, and sometimes it got so tough that i got emotional (I cried because i felt i wasn't living up to expectations). Maybe these schools are calling MY CT and he's saying i'm unstable, even though he says I have the passion and put in a lot more work than student teachers in the past. Anyway, thank you all.
     
  30. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Or maybe that one big call will come on Monday.
     
  31. Mathemagician

    Mathemagician Groupie

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    90 minutes is hard. I had one 90 minute class, and the rest were 42 minute. The 42 minute were a breeze for me, but I really struggled with the 90 minute. As such, I did not apply to any other schools that offer 90 minute or block schedules. Luckily all my classes next year are 42 minute.
     

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