Is "full inclusion" illegal?

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by pete2770, Sep 13, 2012.

  1. pete2770

    pete2770 Comrade

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    Sep 13, 2012

    I never thought of it like this, but I'm reading one of my texts (late at night like the procrastinator I am) and I got to this: "schools must not
    substitute a policy of “full inclusion” for the continuum
    of placements (Bateman & Linden,2006).Such an action
    would be illegal under IDEA"

    I thought I've read on here quite a bit about full inclusion schools? Or am I misunderstanding the concept, and it's actually inclusion as much as possible?

    I thought the idea of inclusion schools was to do away with separation and resource/SPED specific rooms?

    Edit: In regards to the quote it's talking about the continuum of placements such as: regular classroom > self-contained classroom > special school > hospitalization/institution
     
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  3. mollydoll

    mollydoll Connoisseur

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    Sep 13, 2012

    I think what that means is that full inclusion can't be used for everybody. There needs to be a continuum of services, with full inclusion being at one end.

    We have a couple full inclusion schools in our district, but even there students are given a range of services. Some may do well in a single subject classroom (usually small class size, aide, etc), while others need more completely individualized services. But if a student can be effectively educated in the mainstream surroundings, that's where they need to be, by law.

    ETA: the specific school I've subbed in is mostly for students with emotional/behavioral disabilities. They are referred there from the other schoos because the existing situation isn't working. In many cases, they return.
     
  4. pete2770

    pete2770 Comrade

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    Sep 13, 2012

    That makes a lot of sense. So your full inclusion schools still offer some degree of separation (albeit mildly when required), and of course the districts still have access to specialized schools. I take it the services provided within the regular classrooms stands in lieu of the requirement that a specialized room be tried before a special school.

    Thanks. :)
     
  5. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Sep 13, 2012

    Pete, I think you're on to something though. I do think sometimes people push full inclusion when inappropriate out of a value of respecting diversity and attempting to be equal. But, yes - full inclusion itself is not illegal as an option, so long as it's an option that is only exercised when appropriate.
     
  6. WaterfallLady

    WaterfallLady Enthusiast

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    Sep 13, 2012

    Least Restrictive Environments are mandated by IDEA. However, the environment has to be appropriate. A school can't take every child with special needs and put them in full inclusion- there are kids that need more. That's the Individualized part of an IEP. And if the environment is not appropriate for the student, it's not the LRE.
     
  7. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Sep 13, 2012

    We had a similar debate. My district (state perhaps?) is getting rid of all ICC classrooms. These are the full time SpEd classrooms. ALL students will be mainstreamed with inclusion or resource room pull-outs. I tried arguing that it is illegal. My coworker said it is legal. I don't see how it can be. Or how it will do anything but hurt these kids!
     
  8. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    We went away from resource this year into complete full inclusion.
     
  9. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Sep 13, 2012

    What about your severely disabled students? Are they mainstreamed as well?
     
  10. karebear76

    karebear76 Habitué

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    Sep 13, 2012

    While I agree with the comments above, particularly after going through an audit with the state department and being 'dinged' on the continuum of placements; I do struggle with the implementation with limited resources. It is a connundrum that I've been trying to find an answer to for a long time. I am the only sp ed teacher for my grade level. I have 11 students currently (have had as many as 23) in 2 homerooms (have been in all 5 homerooms). If there are students that have full inclusion as LRE, some students with pull out minutes as LRE, and some students with self-contained as LRE, how on earth am I supposed to provide those services?

    I'd really like to know what others are doing. There has to be a better way than all or nothing, which unfortunately seems to be the norm.
     
  11. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Sep 13, 2012

    We don't have severely disabled students. If they happen to live in our district, they are bussed to a bigger neighboring district. The only SPED I cover is learning disabilities.
     
  12. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Sep 13, 2012

    That's how it was where I grew up.
    Here, our district is very large. Only a few schools have classrooms for these kids- we are not one of them. However, beginning next year, they will no longer exist :dizzy:
     
  13. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Sep 13, 2012

    giraffe~that is scary that they are taking those classrooms away. :(
     
  14. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Yes, it is!!! I assume parents will have to pay for private education if they want their children to be in non-traditional classrooms.

    I still say that there is no way it is legal. My teammate says that I am wrong. :dunno:
     
  15. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Sep 13, 2012

    In the case of next year when they students will have no place to go but the general ed classroom, then yes that is illegal. For our district all our students that would normally be in a resource class are still in their LRE because they're getting the content but on a modified level.
     
  16. deefreddy

    deefreddy Companion

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    Sep 13, 2012

    I don't think "illegal" is the correct term. I think you might be able to call the school district "out of compliance", but only if the full inclusion did not offer the supports and services necessary to insure the student was making progress. And let's face it, a student with severe needs getting the support they need in a classroom of 30-40 other typical students and one teacher? Not gonna happen. What is most shocking about this post is the differences in supports and services across different areas of the country and districts. What a mishmash!
     
  17. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Sep 14, 2012

    The district would be out of compliance if they put a child whose LRE for, let's say, Math was resource room in an inclusion setting.

    They would be required to have a resource room setting somewhere in the district, or they would not be providing a full continuum of services.

    i.e. in my local district, only two of the five elementary schools have a ESL program. Any students who need the ESL/ELL program are assigned to the school where the ELL teacher is (and if they are more than 1.5 miles away from the school they are assigned, they get free busing)
     
  18. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Sep 14, 2012

    As long as the full continuum of services is offered, then schools can be full inclusion schools. I work in a full inclusion school with some resource support (RtI pull out mostly). When we have students with more severe needs, they are bussed to a neighboring school that offers the placement that they need. Some students are bussed to our special education cooperative that has more services for students with severe needs.
     
  19. jamoehope

    jamoehope Companion

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    Sep 22, 2012

    Hmm, some of these schools sound like the district where I worked at last year. It was interesting because the year before I worked at a middle school that had a continuum of SPED services, so there were SDC classes (SPED classes) for those students who were functioning far enough below grade level, then resource support classes for homework help, and pushing in support in the regular classrooms.

    Then I was transferred to another middle school that only had resource support classes for homework help and pushing in support in the regular classrooms. When a parent showed up very worried about her son who had come from SDC classes in 6th grade and was working below grade level, and she asked me about SDC classes at the middle school level, I mentioned the other middle school. She tried to transfer her son and was unsuccessful.

    This got me into trouble because as it was explained to me, our district was supposed to be moving to full inclusion for the vast majority of SPED students. So I wasn't supposed to be letting it be known that SDC classes existed in other schools?! Like we weren't allowed to let students go to other schools if the school has different models at each site? It still doesn't make sense to me. I also was told I needed to be more forceful with parents and only push our full-inclusion model.

    So I don't know how right or wrong I was in that situation, I've been told I was right because I was telling the truth to the parent, I've also been told I was right but I was wrong because I shouldn't make it seem like the district is doing anything sneaky or wrong with our SPED kids.

    I guess the point of my post in terms of full-inclusion is I'm in favor of it for many SPED students, but I think there has to be a continuum as others have said. Maybe you have a SPED student who can be in some regular classes with push-in support, but needs a SPED class in the area of language arts or math because he's over two years below grade level. Or you have a student who only needs push in support.

    And I am afraid that districts are trying to move into full-inclusion or keep our kids in more SPED classes more and more because it saves money to do one or the other exclusively, as opposed to having the continuum as we are supposed to have. I definitely agree with the post that the "special" in special ed. means SPECIALIZED to that kid--I just worry that it's going to continue to be under attack.
     
  20. BumbleB

    BumbleB Habitué

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    Sep 23, 2012

    We had a MR/MH/CD room, resource rooms, tutoring and full inclusion last year. This year, we still have the room for those with severe needs (they have an alternate curriculum that focuses more on life skills)....but the only other option is full inclusion. I am really struggling with a student who is somewhere between a first and second grade reading level. When common core pushes rich and complex texts, how do I meet his needs? We are starting a new novel next week, and I plan to let him listen to the book on tape via iPod when everyone else silent reads and we'll see if it helps him. What would help him even more is having some pull-out services for reading fluency. Not everyone is capable of doing full inclusion :rolleyes:
     
  21. Special-t

    Special-t Enthusiast

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    Sep 23, 2012

    . The Common Core is already creating a challenge for my Algebra 1 sped students. (Because if the writing componant) So I worked out a system where my students attend class in the gen Ed classroom when the teacher presents new ideas, then I pull them out for a few days to practice and test ... then we go back in. So far, it's working really well.
     
  22. BumbleB

    BumbleB Habitué

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    That's a good idea. I just worry that it will promote a stigma of those being "my" kids and that they're different from the rest of the class. We had the idea of pre-testing each new concept and I could pull the low ones, regardless of if they were on an IEP or not, but I got a bipolar/odd/adhd kid a few weeks into school who has been monopolizing most of our time. It's our first year doing co-teaching, so hopefully I can improve my efficiency each year.
     
  23. Special-t

    Special-t Enthusiast

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    The nameplate on my classroom says "Intervention Specialist". I tell my students to say the are getting intervention if anyone asks. And truthfully, my students like being pulled. They feel they learn more in a small group. They can relax and ask questions they would not ask in front of the gen ed group. And, I don't actually pull them from class. I let them know the day before to report to my room.
     
  24. inhisgrip20

    inhisgrip20 Comrade

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    Sep 25, 2012

    Giraffe, what happens to the teachers who were teaching those classes... will they become "support" teachers for the students who are being pushed in to inclusive classrooms or are they losing their jobs? Just curious.
     

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