Is ESL education a good field to enter? ESL teacher jobs in NYC?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Bombadillo, May 27, 2015.

  1. Bombadillo

    Bombadillo Rookie

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    Is ESL education a good field to enter? ESL teacher job prospects in NYC?

    Hello All,

    I am a junior English major considering a career as a teacher. I realize that the market for teachers is not very good at present due to the poor economy, and that many prospective teachers are unable to find steady work.
    However, I am most interested in a career as an ESL teacher (I would obtain an ESOL Ed. M). Although I have heard that ESL education is a more in-demand field than many other teaching subjects, and that there is lots of potential for growth, I have also heard that the majority of teachers now are obtaining TESOL certification and that many administrators, when hiring, don't know the difference between an ESOL Ed. M. and TESOL certification, so that qualified ESL professionals have a hard time finding good full-time positions.
    Is this true? Or are there plenty of good positions for ESL teachers? Is the demand for ESL teachers greater than that for teachers in other subjects? Are they as respected as teachers in other subjects, with the same level of job establishment / reliability? And is the salary for an ESL teacher comparable to the salaries of other teachers, such as English, History, or Chemistry teachers? Overall, what are the job prospects for ESL teachers? Although I am open to traveling abroad as an ESL instructor for a few years, I would eventually like to settle in the United States (preferably in New York, my home state).
    Lastly, does anyone know how the job market for ESL teachers is in New York City? I live on Long Island, so am thinking about working in NYC. Any advice, information, or experience of yours is greatly appreciated. I want to learn as much as I can before going ahead with my ESL education career plans.
    Thank you so much! I appreciate your help and input! :)
     
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  3. AlbertGreenwale

    AlbertGreenwale New Member

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    I myself think that teaching career is more respected profession in the world but when you say all about salary of the teachers.It is not so good but they can manage their life happily with their salary.
    At the present, as an ESL teacher profession is not bad.Many teachers nowdays are obtaining an ESOL Ed. M certification and taking good full-time positions.It is true and real.Have a look at the New York City.There are many ESL teachers who get handsome salary about $75,000 per year.It is not bad as a ESL teacher.
     
  4. Bunnie

    Bunnie Devotee

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    In NYC there is a high demand for ESL teachers. There's an even higher demand for ESL teachers that are dually certified. For example Elementary and ESL. Salary is the same as teachers of other subjects in NYC public schools. It's based on experience and level of education. Basically a Chem teacher with 4 years experience and a Master's gets paid the same as an ESL teacher with 4 years experience and a Master's.

    Whether or not ESL teachers are respected as classroom teachers varies by school and admin. Generally in my school the ESL teachers are first to be pulled to cover classes if we can't obtain a sub, and that happens often.

    And honestly in high need areas I doubt principals in NYC care about how you obtain your certification in ESL has long and you know your stuff and impress them when they interview you.

    I would look into the NYC Teaching Fellows program for ESL. it'll allow you to teach ESL while obtaining your Master's and professional certification at the same time. It might be worth it if you're comepletely sure you want to teach ESL.
     
  5. linswin23

    linswin23 Cohort

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    If you are worried about finding a job, you may want to consider teaching ESL overseas. There's a huge job market and you could find a job easily. I teach ESL overseas and I love it. It's not for everyone, but maybe take a look into it?
     
  6. Bombadillo

    Bombadillo Rookie

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    Thanks Albert, that is good to know!
     
  7. Bombadillo

    Bombadillo Rookie

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    Thanks Bunnie, that's a lot of detailed and helpful info! I'm glad to hear about how in-demand ESL teachers are in NYC, and that they are treated for the most part the same as other teachers. I have actually looked into NYC Teaching Fellows, and I am hoping to participate in the program after undergrad. Thanks again!
     
  8. Bombadillo

    Bombadillo Rookie

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    Thanks linswin23, I am definitely interested in teaching ESL overseas for some years, but eventually I want to settle back home in the U.S. and know that I can have a secure job as an ESL teacher. Glad to hear you are enjoying your teaching overseas!
     
  9. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    There are some differences among states regarding how one is certified to teach ESL. In NJ, you need a minimum of 15 graduate credits if you already have a standard teaching certificate, 21 credits if you lack the teaching certificate. Once you earn that many credits, it is common to take three more courses and earn the masters, since that is usually a large bump on the pay scale. In other states, the only requirement is that you pass the exam, no requirements for additional college credits. In NJ, even with the ESL certification, if you are going to teach in schools, not the adult population, you must also acquire your elementary ed certification. It would be nice if this were the same in every state, but it isn't. I would say that if you have or are eligible for a K-12 content certification, that is valuable with ESL - it helps teaching academic language, allows you to teach English while learning a subject in context.

    You may want to look into what various states require, since you sound like you are young enough that there is a possibility that you won't stay in one state your entire life. That is something that I know something about.
     
  10. renard

    renard Companion

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    The nice thing about ESOL endorsement (K-12) or TESL certification (standard for adults) is that it leaves you the options of teaching EFL to students in their home countries or international schools (K-12 abroad with US/Canadian/British curriculum). Both are abroad, but very different jobs. Usually, international schools provide better pay and working conditions (not that the other ones are bad though). My uncle is currently the head of an international school in China, and he is raking in the dough, to say the least. It's a great way to save up for your later years.

    I have my TESL certification (for university-level EFL instruction, not international schools) and it's nice to know the option is always there, just in case. I'm currently an adult ESL teacher in Canada.
     
  11. Bombadillo

    Bombadillo Rookie

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    Thanks lynettstoy! I'll definitely look into the differences between state requirements.
     
  12. Bombadillo

    Bombadillo Rookie

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    Thanks renard! By "very different jobs", are you referring to the difference between jobs one can get with the ESOL endorsement as opposed to the TESOL certification (as in teaching k-12 with ESOL vs. teaching adults with TESOL)? It sounds like China is the most popular destination for ESL teachers teaching overseas, very interesting.
     
  13. linswin23

    linswin23 Cohort

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    I currently work in China right now and there are LOADS upon LOADS of jobs.

    What renard means by "very different jobs" is that there are generally two sectors of international teaching. One is working for international schools that use IB curriculum (or British curriculum). These schools usually service expat children, so you end up with kids from all over the world. These teaching positions always require a teaching cert from your home country, a few years experience (at least) and usually training or experience in teaching the IB program.

    On the other side of the coin, there are many language schools that will hire people to teach English (there are schools for all age groups) without a teaching cert. These types of schools or program usually require you to have a Bachelor's degree, be a native speaker, and have a TEFOL certificate from just about any program. These schools almost always pay less than IB schools.

    I've seen many third-party agencies that hire teachers to work in public schools in China as well. These agencies tend to pay pretty well because you must be certified in your home country.
     
  14. renard

    renard Companion

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    Sorry, I didn't see your question! Linswin23 explained it well. There are pros and cons to both.

    The non-IB/British/etc schools are similar to what you know. The other schools (and the majority of jobs in China) will vary between Chinese children, co-teaching Chinese children/youth, language schools for adults, study/cram schools, it is a wide variety.
     
  15. runsw/scissors

    runsw/scissors Phenom

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    I cannot speak to NYC or overseas teaching. I am in Nebraska teaching elementary ELL, and I love it! It is true that ELL teachers are first pulled to cover if a sub cannot be found. That happened more than a few times in my school. However, that (in my mind) does not mean lack of respect for the position. The parents and classroom teachers were always very thankful for any help I could give the students. ELL students and parents tend to be more respectful than the average because they want their children to do well in America and know that teachers are the main conduit to that happening, especially if the family is from poverty. I think teachers are held in higher esteem in other parts of the world and that attitude carries over. The need for ELL teachers is growing as our immigrant population grows as well.
     
  16. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    You come to Texas, and you can get an ESL/ELL job just about anywhere! ;)
     
  17. nyteach89

    nyteach89 Companion

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    I think ESL is the way to go! I teach in NYC (first grade) and was thinking of getting my ESL license to give me further options down the road. Most of the children at my school come from families that do not speak English/don't speak English themselves so they all receive ESL. Even if you look on Long Island, which is where I am from too, there has been an influx of children and families where English is not their first language. In my opinion, you can't go wrong.
     
  18. ChildWhisperer

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    Even if you don't end up teaching ESL/ELL, it's a good endorsement to have for the future! Plus, it looks good on your resume & license/certificate.
     
  19. Bombadillo

    Bombadillo Rookie

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    Thanks renard! That's good to know!
     
  20. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    I know that the road to certification in ESL in Texas and many other states is very different than the road to ESL in NJ. Do I understand that there is a single test to pass, whether or not you have grad courses? I seem to remember that there is a tie in somehow to the Generalist license, but I am foggy on that. In NJ, we must have the grad courses (15 hours if already in possession of a standard certificate, 21 hours if you don't have that certificate, and 3 of the hours will be a semester practicum.) The universities then administer a comprehensive exam, which you must pass for the state to grant you your certificate. The best part is that we are fairly uniform in how we teach, but I would be lying if I didn't admit to a little jealousy when someone talks about one exam and done.

    I am a little perplexed as to why all the teachers don't take the test and become certified. Is there something to it I am missing?
     
  21. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Groupie

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    In IL, you have to take classes in ESL/ELL and then take the exam for it in order to be certified.
    I'd guess that most of these teachers don't want to or have time/money to take the extra classes
     
  22. 4815162342

    4815162342 Companion

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    I'm not sure about the grad courses question, in texas you can get certified with just a bachelor's degree. But yes, the esl supplemental certification was just an extra test. My previous school required it for k-3 and all ela teachers 4 and up.
     
  23. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    Yes, in Texas ESL used to be a separate certification, but several years back they changed it to just an endorsement. That means as long as you already hold a valid certification in any area, you can take that test and be "endorsed" to teach ESL. My district requires it for every core subject teacher, k-12.
     

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