Is anyone using the Kahn math in the classroom?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Upsadaisy, Sep 1, 2013.

  1. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Sep 1, 2013

    I just watched the repeat of the 60 Minutes show on it and I wondered if any of you used Kahn and the flipped classroom. I'd love to hear about it.
     
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  3. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Last year I started more of a "slow rollover" than an actual flip. I assigned videos-- including but not limited to Khan-- for homework once or twice a week and had the kids take notes.

    It really freed up classtime for problem solving. The kids loved it, and the vast majority did the homework.

    Then Sandy hit, and I couldn't be sure that my kids had textbooks, much less computers. A number were living in hotels or shelters.

    So my rollover ended.

    I want to try it again this year, with my Algebra kids. First I'll have to ensure that all have access to the internet, either at home or during study hall. (If a kid takes chorus, he doesn't always have a study hall.)

    I would never totally abdicate giving notes-- I think I give killer notes!! But I'm willing to give a real shot to a different approach if it will help me reach more of my kids.
     
  4. Jeky

    Jeky Comrade

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    I still can't wrap my head around how to make flipped instruction work at the middle school level. Maybe in high school with an honors class....I guess my biggest problem with it is that I don't teach "sit and get" style, even for math. Yes I do direct instruction and give notes, but I am constantly assessing my students throughout the "lecture". I would say I teach for maybe 2-3 minutes, then hand it over to the students for 1-2 minutes. During that time I use partner talk, guided questions, as well as just walking around the room to guide my next 2-3 minute chunk. I just can't imagine recording a 20-30 minute (or even 15 minute) lecture without getting any feedback from my students.
     
  5. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Sep 2, 2013

    I think it worked well last year because of the nature of Geometry. There are a LOT of rules to present, and the kids have to copy those notes before I can really teach anything.

    So the videos would be fairly short-- most 6-8 minutes of instruction, with a number of examples. To be honest, it's the one thing I've always hated about teaching Geometry-- the amount of time I've wasted watching the kids copy the rules. So having the kids copy them at home, with instruction as to what the theorems meant, did save me class time.

    Tomorrow is my first Algebra I class for the year. My homework will be to watch a video on Order of Operations with mixed numbers.

    http://www.teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?video_id=232822

    It's an 8.5 minute video (plus time to copy the notes). It should refresh their memories well enough to enable me to cover Order of Operations fairly quickly.

    The rest of the week, their homework will be out of the textbook.

    Ive searched for other teachers who have done a full flip. Here are two:

    http://www.maysville.k12.oh.us/page/1851

    http://www.youtube.com/user/karlfisch

    I may end up using a lot of their stuff this year. I'm going to take it one day at a time as far as flipping goes. The point is to improve my teaching. If and when this becomes a game, it ends. But if it can provide me with additional class time for teaching, then I fgure it's well worth the try.

    The short time I was able to use it last year, it worked well enough to inspire me to try it again. I have no idea whether it will work long term or not; Sandy hit when we were about 7 weeks into the school year last year, just really starting to hit some meaty material.

    So we'll see how it goes this year.

    But one of the complaints I always see about veteran teachers is that we tend to be stuck in our ways. I don't ever want to be THAT teacher-- the one who teaches the exact same lessons in the exact same way from one decade to the next. I'm willing to give this a shot. If it doesn't work, no harm done... I'm not going to dig in my heels and stick with it for a whole year unless I can see that it's benefitting my kids.
     
  6. teacherguy111

    teacherguy111 Cohort

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    Sep 2, 2013

    I saw the 60 minutes show also. I am an English teacher so I have not used it yet. I don't think I would use it to flip my classroom totally. My school has virtual days every year, they have to stay at home and learn from the internet that day. I think the kahn academy videos would be awesome for that.

    I want to teach social studies in the future, so maybe I will use the videos more often then.
     
  7. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    I can see it working well for both math and social studies. It would depend a lot on whether or not kids were willing or able to comply with the out-of-school assignment, especially if you didn't use the method solely. I wonder how many school districts are trying this for all or some of their schools.
     
  8. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Alice, I had a realization one year when visiting with a returning student who was then in 9th grade. She had taken algebra I with me in 8th grade. One comment she made really struck me. She said that I had taught them so well, led them through the curriculum so well, that she was having a harder time with teachers who left more up to the students. And this was a brilliant girl. A different method would have worked better for her, though probably not for her less brilliant peers.
     
  9. Jeky

    Jeky Comrade

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    Sep 2, 2013

    (Alice -- not trying to nitpick your ideas here; just trying to figure out how to adapt this idea to my own classroom. I actually really LIKE the idea, I just have a hard time convincing myself that my students watching a lecture at home is benefitting them more)
     
  10. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Jeky, it strikes me that flipping the classroom for sixth grade math and science - especially science - could work really well. One could make videos with more elaborate demonstrations etc. than would be practical in the classroom, and possibly assign students to generate some questions or comments; then one could reserve classroom time for hands-on practice and questions to be answered by The Subject Matter Expert (=you).
     
  11. Catcherman22

    Catcherman22 Companion

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    Sep 2, 2013

    I flip my Int Algebra and Pre Calc classes.

    It's ALOT of work for me. I make my own videos, and I never use the same video over the years because I make my videos based on the needs of the class.

    Having said that, I'll never go back to the old method. I know exactly where each of my 36 kids is at when they leave the room. I get to speak to each one every day. Those who are having a hard time get individualized attention. Those who have it, get a chance to work without being bothered or having to wait for their peers. It does help that we have a 90 minute block.

    Students who don't have access to the internet can either watch the videos before or after school (or I have a few who use lunch to watch right before class starts). I require students who didn't watch the videos to watch them the first part of class. Once kids realize that I make them watch the video's regardless... they do it outside of class.

    My students like it once they get the hang of it, and I've watched my scores skyrocket. One student last year said: "There's nothing more frustrating than getting home and having a hard time completing the homework. At least now, I can ask questions on my homework."
     
  12. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Sep 2, 2013

    The benefit comes from the fact that I'm spending my time with them explaining the math, not dictating the rules.

    My kids don't passively watch; I check the homework to ensure that they took notes. And I DO explain the highlights of the video.

    But let's say the video is on Pythagorean Theorem. In a tradtional class, I would write the theorem and wait while they copied it down, word for word. Then I would translate the theorem into "English" and wait again. Then I would start practice problems.

    With my slow rollover, I skip the first step and part of the second. I get right to the "English" version of the theorem. And, since they've copied one or two model problems from the video, I can get right to the meatier examples. My 38 minute class spends a lot more time on problem solving. I can explain the nuances, tie it into Special Triangles, show them a list of some of the Pythagorean Triples... all because of the increased time the video has bought me.
     
  13. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Sep 2, 2013

    I haven't flipped my classroom, but the students do use the kahn videos to help them with math. I really like the website, and it has helped many of my students.
     

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