Is any principal going to hire a pregnant teacher?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Mommy1982, Apr 5, 2013.

  1. Mommy1982

    Mommy1982 Rookie

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    I have no full-time teaching experience and I am pregnant and due in late October. So it would be my first year. I'm in NY, where it's pretty much impossible to get a job in a public school, but last year I got many calls from Catholic schools. There is also a brand new public school opening up that I would be eligible to be hired at.

    Thing is, I already have a soon to be 2 year old, it would be my first year and I'm not exactly looking forward to my first 2 months teaching ever being almost ready to give birth. I'm thinking most principals would pass on me, especially since I would be leaving for maternity leave right in the beginning of the school year and it's my first year, so it would be pretty stressful. I would be interested in maybe teaching later in the school year though. So, would you bother sending out resumes for the upcoming school year? Or just wait until mid-year?
     
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  3. Jerseygirlteach

    Jerseygirlteach Groupie

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    The non-PC honest answer is that anything is possible, but it's going to be very hard for you to make them see past that. You also need to take into consideration what it's going to be like for you as a first-year teacher with a newborn and a toddler at home. I'm certainly not saying that it can't be done, but it'll probably one of the hardest years of your life.

    Good luck, though! Do you have a sought-after certification that can increase your odds?
     
  4. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Legally, they cannot discriminate against you because you are pregnant. As to whether or not it actually matters would depend on the individual principal. My principal would not care if you were to really impress her, but I know some that wouldn't consider you. (Of course it would be for a reason besides your pregnancy.)

    In the meantime, I'd keep applying. You never know and it can't hurt. You have to decide if a full time job in this current market is worth working while heavily pregnant.
     
  5. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Principals who would discriminate against you for being pregnant are not principals you want to work for.

    My school has hired many pregnant teachers, so it can and does happen. If you're very worried about it, you could certainly request phone or Skype interviews (keeping the camera well above your belly) and disclose the pregnancy only after you have been hired and signed all the paperwork. Some people (even some members here) believe that this practice is unethical, but I believe that it's one way to ensure that you won't be discriminated against for being pregnant. If you do a phone interview and don't get the job, you'll know it was because you weren't the right fit and not because you are about to have a baby. It's up to you to decide for yourself if that's a position you'll want to take. I believe that the law will support you.

    I feel like I have to add, however, that even though employers can't fire you for being pregnant, they might make your professional life very miserable if they are unhappy that you didn't disclose your pregnancy during the interview process. Obviously I think that these sorts of employers are bad people, but that doesn't mean much when we're talking about the practicalities of getting and keeping a job. Again, it's something you'll have to decide for yourself.

    Good luck!
     
  6. Mommy1982

    Mommy1982 Rookie

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    No, I'm certified in childhood edu. Everyone's pushing me to get certified in Special Ed since it seems like that is the only way new teachers are getting jobs in public schools in my area. Yeah, I am a little scared at the fact of having a newborn and toddler home and getting planning done at home. Plus, it's difficult enough to get used to having 2 kids vs 1 and juggling it being my first year teaching. I just figured I would ask you guys, but my gut says no one will want to hire me anyway, that's if I even get any interviews. Above poster, I haven't found a principal yet who didn't want to do an in-person interview, and at 8 months pregnant, there's no way I'm hiding that lol.

    Maybe I will just wait it out and send resumes maybe mid-school year. I know sometimes leave positions come up. I got a call last month, but the school was too from me.
     
  7. mrachelle87

    mrachelle87 Fanatic

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    I was pregnant when I was hired, but didn't know it. When I found out (two week after starting), I went to my administrator (asst. supt.) and told her. I offered to step down so someone else could finish the year with the kids. I was due in April. She just hugged me and told me no. Then she went out of her way to watch out for me. I was so lucky to have her in my life. I was a late hire and the year before I had been nonrenewed. I was in a very fragile place, but she made it so much easier.
     
  8. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Apr 5, 2013

    Hiring a teacher is a long-term investment in that person's talents. Pregnancy and family leave are short-term. A savvy hiring principal will keep that in mind.
     
  9. MissD59

    MissD59 Comrade

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    Are you on Long Island by any chance?

    I'm only asking because I am, and while I'm not a principal or administrator, I know how saturated the market is. The legal, PC answer is that potential employers cannot discriminate against you because you are pregnant.

    My gut feeling though is that with so many potential candidates who have years of experience and were excessed due to the economy/multiple certifications/aren't pregnant that it probably doesn't help your chances.

    That being said, you don't know unless you try! If you're not even playing the game, you have no chance of winning.
     
  10. SF_Giants66

    SF_Giants66 Cohort

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    It kind of seems like the only issue is being hired than within a few weeks of being on the job you'd have to go on leave. I don't know if I'd even want to start a new job if I would have to take off right before getting started. It makes more sense just to look for jobs mid-way through the school year.
     
  11. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Apply mid year.:2cents:
     
  12. OhThePlaces

    OhThePlaces Cohort

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    I would probably apply mid-year too.
     
  13. teacherfelly

    teacherfelly Rookie

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    You should apply now and just see what happens. You could always apply again mid-year, right?
     
  14. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    I think you've answered your own question. Students need a teacher who is fully present, focused on their needs and excited about their learning.

    Wait until you are ready to commit yourself to this...in the meantime, congratulations on your upcoming arrival:love:
     
  15. teacherfelly

    teacherfelly Rookie

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    Czacza makes a very good point. So, i guess the real question isn't "will a P higher me while pregnant?" it's "do I really want to start my first year ready to pop". Congratulations on the bundle of joy! I can't wait to start my own family!:love:
     
  16. scmom

    scmom Enthusiast

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    I don't know you, but I sense from your post that you don't really want to start working. It may not be p.c., but in your last months you are going to be tired, and not at your best and why add the stress of setting up a classroom and working a new job? It is hard work, even without being pregnant and having a toddler at home.

    My vote is to stay out as long as you can with your precious children, and start subbing when and if you need to. Worry about the full time responsibility of a classroom next year.

    In your state, would the district even have to pay for maternity leave if you have only been there a short while?
     
  17. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    Realistically too, I feel like you only have so much in you in terms of rejection. I've been doing the applying thing, going on 5 years(?!) now. At this point, I've been used up and worn out by it. I have no inclination right now, to start applying again (for next year). It's like anything else--you only have so many bullets to shoot off, until your empty.

    Honestly, I'm not trying to be pessimistic. I think you should wait to apply. Or at least just apply to the most desired ones. Canvasing NYC with applications will only beat you down. Remember too, post-pardom you may need a dose of motivation too. Your outlook might be different if you have "suffered" through a full applying season already. Just pick and choose.
     
  18. Reality Check

    Reality Check Habitué

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    If there are 500 applicants for one position and one of them tells the principal/interviewing committee, "I'll be here the first month, then I'll be out for maternity leave," don't you think they'll be more likely to consider the other 499 applicants?

    I know if I were in their position, I would want someone from beginning to end without interruption when I have so many people to choose from.


    :mellow:
     

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