Is Alliant University reputable? Does it matter for interviews?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by cready, Apr 7, 2021.

  1. cready

    cready New Member

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    Apr 7, 2021

    I'm going into a credential program and thinking about whether to accept admission to Alliant University's credential + MAE program. The program is only 7 units on top of a credential to earn my master's, which sounds amazing and for only a few thousand dollars over the price of credential. However everything I see about Alliant has them ranked pretty terribly against other national online universities and brick and mortar schools in general. I need to do an online program for my current work and personal life. I'm wondering if the school you get your credential/masters from really matters when it comes to getting hired or if it's more how you market yourself and your experiences. Will I not get a job because someone else got their credential from somewhere like Cal Poly or Stanford? Is Alliant really not a good school?

    Thank you,
    Claire
     
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  3. whizkid

    whizkid Groupie

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    Apr 7, 2021

    It is regionally accredited which is the first thing to look for with any school. Whether or not it is a good school, I guess ymmv.
     
  4. cready

    cready New Member

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    Apr 8, 2021

    That's kind of what I think, it's the credential issued by the ctc and the fact that I have a masters that should matter.
     
  5. nklauste

    nklauste Comrade

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    Apr 9, 2021

    Keep in mind, a masters with no teaching experience is not always looked upon favorably by administrators. If you aren't currently teaching, you could price yourself out of a job.
     
  6. cready

    cready New Member

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    Jun 23, 2021

    You mean getting a master's without first teaching full time?
     
  7. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Jun 23, 2021

    Furthering your education is always a wonderful thing to do, but being involved in real life teaching full time does a few things that are important. Education without experience lacks perspective and therefore any basis on how important all the details are. An example would be taking a course in special education that offers help for students with certain disabilities. You can read about the disability, you can look up the rationale for different approaches to help the student grasp the concepts, but you are flying blind about what may or may not happen, how important it will be to have in depth knowledge and experience if the students have atypical reactions, or if the way you teach the concepts can create more problems than it cures when you lack the experience of being in the classroom, quite possibly without teacher support, making it very possible that your response may not be the correct response for the situation, the student, or the job. Add to that the fact that your starting salary will be higher than that of a teacher without a graduate degree, and you can understand that many districts will be less likely to give much leeway about mistakes that may arise due to your steeper learning curve. Entering the profession without the grad degree may buy you the chance of making some mistakes that are not career enders - your education would indicate that, like virtually all new teachers, you have a lot of things yet to learn, and it would be very uncommon for someone right out of school with an undergrad degree to be the equal of a teacher with one or more real life years of teaching experience under their belt.

    As far as being regionally accredited, I would be surprised if it lacked that, but that, in and of itself, doesn't make up for being in the lowest 25% of all accredited schools IMHO. I would do more research before committing to a master's degree. Online courses have become so common that you should be able to make really strong comparisons between a number of universities, in an attempt to get the best possible education for your tuition dollars. When getting coursework that will help determine the quality of your own education, remember that ultimately your future students will be impacted greatly by the choices you make today. Teaching is just a job for some, but is almost a calling to others. As a teacher who is also a parent, I could always tell the difference in mind set for my son's teachers over the years, and before I obtained my own credentials, I know how much time and effort went into my choice not only of my universities, but also how I went about adding more credentials, and their sequence of acquisition, so that I didn't end up with gaps in my education that could affect the students I would have in my classrooms. Let me wish you the best of luck as you work through the trying times of choosing your school of choice and your future coursework.
     
  8. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    Jun 24, 2021

    Definitely make sure it's regionally accredited. I've been on the interview committee numerous times in multiple buildings, and we've never once discussed where a candidate went to school as part of the process. It's all about how the candidate interviews and what they know. That said, if the program is bad, you're not going to be as well prepared for interviews and that will show. I got my BA at a tiny private university. It was actually fairly competitive and well known in my hometown area, but when I moved across the country after graduating, no one out here has heard of it. It never hurt me because I was extremely well prepared for interviews.

    The only reason I bothered with getting my MA is because of how our salary scale is structured. It was a significant pay bump, and our salary scale actually cuts you off at a fairly early point if you don't have it. We do PD constantly and there is so much out there for teachers that it's just not necessary to get that information from MA classes. I chose an online program from a bottom tier university, because it was the cheapest thing and I figured no one cares where you get your MA from. Financially, I made the right choice, but the school I chose did bother me more than I thought it would. I get embarrassed anytime I have to answer the, "Where did you get your MA" question, and I felt like I couldn't really be proud of my degree when I graduated. In the long run, it's probably still wise to not go into debt for pride's sake- just another layer to think about.

    Another thing to consider is how field placements and student teaching is set up. For undergrad at my brick and mortar school, they did all of that for us. It seems that since they're not local, online programs require you to find your own placements, which can be challenging, especially if you don't have any connections to local schools. Teachers may also be hesitant to take on a ST from a program they haven't heard of, or a program that has a bad reputation.
     

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