Intros & Conclusions

Discussion in 'Middle School / Junior High' started by MsTeacher98, Sep 22, 2007.

  1. MsTeacher98

    MsTeacher98 Companion

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    Sep 22, 2007

    I'm working with an 8th grade Language Arts enrichment class. We have done ok with writing so far using a combo of 6 Traits, Step Up to Writing and 4 Square. But most of the students seem to be struggling with effective intro and conclusions paragraphs. Anybody have some good tips or ideas to try? I am not the main teacher for this class, but I would like to try to bring in some very user-friendly, hands on ideas for the kids to use. Most are at least a couple years behind in their reading and writing, so any idea is fair game. Thanks so much!:)
     
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  3. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Sep 22, 2007

    I teach math, not ELA, so take it for what it's worth.

    But when I was in HS I competed in Speech & Debate, doing Extemporaneous Speech. Very often I used a line from a popular song (This was the 1970s-- all the songs had deep, deep meanings :) ) I used at as my intro and then referred back to the same quote as my conclusion.
     
  4. Mrs. R.

    Mrs. R. Connoisseur

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    Sep 22, 2007

    Check out readwritethink.org and writingfix.com. Both sites have great writing lessons!
     
  5. kelbel7583

    kelbel7583 Rookie

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    Sep 23, 2007

    Here is what I use with my students to help them with writing. First we do some sort of brainstorming activity. Then. they complete a graphic organizer with the following info. I tell my kids that all great stories have to have a hook to "hook" the reader's attention. This hook could be a question, an exclamation, or even an example of onomatopoeia. For closing sentences, I tell them they need to rephrase their topic sentence to wrap up the story.

    Title:
    Hook:
    Topic Sentence:
    Main Idea 1:
    5 Supporting Details:
    Main Idea 2:
    5 supporting Details:
    Main Idea 3:
    5 supporting Details:
    Closing Sentence:
     
  6. wig

    wig Devotee

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  7. MsTeacher98

    MsTeacher98 Companion

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    Sep 23, 2007

    Thanks so much for all the ideas! I'll be looking up all those sites in a few minutes!
     
  8. jwhitg

    jwhitg Rookie

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    Sep 23, 2007

    Here are a few leads/introductions I have posted in my room. I urge students to experiment with them in their revisions.

    Types of Lead – Great Ways to Create an Introduction to Your Story

    Descriptive Lead

    Show the reader the locale of the piece, when it is taking place, where, and what it looks like. Paint a picture in the reader’s mind.
    The Problem Lead

    Show the problem in a situation, group, or topic. Get the reader curious about the problem.

    The Parody Lead

    Put a twist on well known song lyrics, a saying, or motto in order to show new light on the subject.

    The Simile or Metaphor Lead

    Establish a comparison or relationship between your topic/subject and something well known.

    The Classified Ad Lead

    Use a form of some newspaper column such as “Help Wanted” or “Houses for Sale.” Be careful – don’t use this lead too often!
    The Flashback Lead

    Begin in the past as a way to help explain a current situation.


    The Quotation Lead

    Use an appropriate quotation to begin your piece.



    The Question Lead

    Use an unusual, quirky, or thought-provoking question to kick off your story.
    Don’t use this lead too often, or it may sound fake.
    The What-Where-When Lead

    Use ONLY for “news” type of writing or writing that you want to appear as news. Give the 5 W’s and H in short sentences to quickly show the facts.
    The Name Lead

    Give the name of the person or persons involved in the writing early in the lead. This is good for famous people.

    The Interior Monologue Lead

    Present thoughts, daydreams, ambitions, and plans of the subject.


    The Flat Statement Lead

    Begin with a simple declarative sentence. This may seem easy, but your writing will be more interesting with a more creative lead.
    The First Person Lead

    Use your voice as writer/ participant. Think of it as “this is what I say, did, mean, or here is how to do it.”


    The Second Person Lead

    Write as if you were having a casual face-to-face conversation with a friend. Think of it as “this is what will happen to you or this is what you will see and do.”
     
  9. jwhitg

    jwhitg Rookie

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