Introducing yourself

Discussion in 'Substitute Teachers' started by missythemom, Nov 6, 2011.

  1. missythemom

    missythemom Rookie

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    Nov 6, 2011

    I am looking for some advice on what to include in my introduction to my students. I am thinking of course of my name, what I hope to accomplish that day and my expectations for behavior. I was also thinking of allowing them to ask a few questions before we got started for the day if they wanted to, but I am now wondering if that might just take too much time. So I guess I am wondering how you all go about introducing yourself to the class. Thanks :)
     
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  3. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Nov 6, 2011

    Questions can get out of hand quickly. For small children, they are genuinely curious creatures. The older they get, it becomes a game. When I substitute taught, I would say my name and write it on the board, tell them we all know what's generally speaking okay and not okay, and then get to business. Many times I would know a student in the room or a sibling of a student and I would "casually" but purposefully mention that, as that somehow seemed to make me more legit. :) But otherwise: hello, lesson, goodbye.
     
  4. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    Nov 6, 2011

    I don't do any questions (other than, "where is Mrs. x today?"), because as JustMe said... it can quickly get out of hand. And yeah--hello, lesson, goodbye! ;)
     
  5. missythemom

    missythemom Rookie

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    Nov 6, 2011

    See, that is what I was thinking too. I envisioned them using that "question and answer" time to get silly. Thanks :)
     
  6. Vince

    Vince Rookie

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    Nov 7, 2011

    If there is no seating chart, and you will have them longer than one period, make one! Trust me, this will help you greatly. I do this as I take roll. Draw the desks before the kids get there, then fill in names as you go down the list.

    As far as what you tell them. I tell them I will be leaving a list of names for their teacher about who was good and who was bad. I tell them I am not afraid to kick a student out if he doesn't know how to behave. I tell them that just because their regular teacher is gone, this is not a free day.

    I modify as needed, depending on age level.
     
  7. missythemom

    missythemom Rookie

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    Nov 16, 2011

    Thanks for your help :)
     
  8. jen12

    jen12 Devotee

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    Nov 16, 2011

    I wouldn't let them ask a bunch of questions. Older kids will drag it on in order to avoid doing work.

    I have found that I have to assure students that I am a "real" teacher. For some reason, students think subs are some other life form. I'm not sure what it is they believe we do, but I actually had a third grader incredulously once ask, "you're a teacher?" when I said something about being a teacher. When I asked what he thought I was, he said "a sub." So I tell them that I go to different schools and teach all the grades. Students tend to think you don't know anything and they have to walk you through the entire day. Gently let them know that you will be in charge, and although things might be a tad different, it'll be okay. This is particularly important in kinder, where they will get upset if you sit on the wrong side of the calendar or some other very minor detail.

    As far as behavioral expectations, I ask them if their teacher has been absent before, and how the day went. Did they get a good report, or did they get in trouble? I remind them that the rules are the same every day, no matter who the teacher is in their classroom.
     
  9. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Nov 21, 2011

    When I was subbing, I would do the following:
    - write my name on the board.
    - when they came in, asked everyone to sit up straight, with the knees under the desk (it worked great, I got their attention. I don't think many people told any of these students how to sit right).
    - by this time they were sitting quietly, I told them my name, and that I will be there for the day.
    That's it! After that I went into my behavioral / participation expectation and we got to work.

    I'm from Europe, with an accent, and people usually can't figure out where i'm from, so it is natural to become curious. If I'd let them ask questions, it would never end. When they asked me where I was from, I'd answer that and that's it.

    Later on, during the lesson I would reveal some info, but it depended on the situation. For example my daughter was in the same age range as the students (middle school), which somehow made me more 'valid'. When i told them "I'm a teacher, I'm just not your regular teacher", or I'd let them know that I was an English teacher, that also made me more credible.

    But overall, I'd say no to allowing them to have questions. They will use that to pass time, instead of instruction.
     
  10. Anonymousteach

    Anonymousteach Companion

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    Nov 28, 2011

    I generally use this introduction:

    "Good Morning/Afternoon. For those of you that haven't had me before, I'm (name). Please keep in mind that all school rules and policies still apply. When I call your name, please let me know you're here."

    I'll adjust it depending on where I am working that day. At some schools, I'm there regularly enough so the kids know me, and there's no need for it.

    Although it's been said in other posts, I'll say the same thing, don't do questions. It does get out of hand quickly and there will always be the class comedian that will ask silly questions on purpose. However, if a student asks me where's Mr./Mrs. _______ I'll answer it.

    As far as seating charts are concerned, I'm always a bit wary because some teachers don't update it, and it turns out they moved everyone around. I just read off the names on the chart when doing attendance.
     

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