Introducing History

Discussion in 'First Grade' started by Bored of Ed, Oct 14, 2007.

  1. Bored of Ed

    Bored of Ed Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2006
    Messages:
    2,230
    Likes Received:
    1

    Oct 14, 2007

    How do you do it?
    Where do you start?

    What about geography?
    Do they go together?
    What grade starts world geography? (continents? difference between city/state in address? USA= our country, as opposed to neighborhood? When does all this get sorted out?)

    My kids are actually not first grade... they're 10-12 y/o special ed. But they don't know any of this stuff. So I'm trying to figure out in which grade to go fishing for ideas. :)

    tia
     
  2.  
  3. Pattie

    Pattie Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2007
    Messages:
    240
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 14, 2007

    I think a good way for any grade 1st and up is to read the book "Me on the Map" and then do some studying of maps, ordinal directions, continents and oceans. I introduce oceans and continents when we study Christopher Columbus. You could introduce it during a study of the pilgrims crossing the Atlantic. I have little placemats I laminated of the world map and we do lots of games and activities kind of like "Where in the world is..." that I have compiled over the years. Start with literature books on maps and the geography of the world, easy books for a read aloud and then maybe get a short dvd of something on that topic, and find a little minibook or worksheets or just a world map blackline to reproduce for the kids to start making a "geography folder" Then collect them and add to them each holiday (Christmas around the world, January study Chinese New Year and anything Asia, May study Cinco de Mayo and anything Mexico etc.) till you've got a nice minibook to staple together with a creative cover highlighting all they have learned throughout the semester. I do my units this way and the kids learn the topics very deeply and richly. :up:
     
  4. Bored of Ed

    Bored of Ed Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2006
    Messages:
    2,230
    Likes Received:
    1

    Oct 14, 2007

    Whoa, you have a lot going on there. Thanks for all the suggestions.

    Could you please describe some of your activities more specifically?

    Oh, btw... my kids don't read. At all. :(
     
  5. Pattie

    Pattie Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2007
    Messages:
    240
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 14, 2007

    Sure! I didn't get that your kids can't read. That will make it more challenging to you but read alouds I bet they still will love. I just got done with Christopher Columbus. We read a few read alouds, looked at a weekly reader, then we made pop up books with 3 ships each popped up differently and they printed a poem for the text under the pop up. You could have the text xeroxed. Then we painted the blue water and a tall ship and used tear art. It was pretty to tear the painted blue water and then see waves in the white tears. I added a piece of kleenex and a toothpick to represent sails on the ship and then we backed the whole thing in a black background frame.
    Then we read a rhyming Columbus choral reading next day and did a "What would he pack in his knapsack" activity where there were pictures of cell phones, clocks, sundials, hourglasses and stuff like that to choose between. Then we did the mapping activities with the world map placemats. I taught them "Never, Eat, Soggy, Waffles" for the North, East, South, West kind of pneumonic memory device. Then we made maps and x ed the area of Spain and the Bahamas where he landed.
    That was geography and social studies for the week basically. 3 - 4 activities. But my kids read real good. You could modify of course. ;)
     
  6. firstgradeteach

    firstgradeteach Comrade

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2007
    Messages:
    450
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 14, 2007

    I start early in the year with a country/ culture week. One day for a different county. This year I had a Mexico, Africa, Middle East(talked about Iraq, and Iran), India, and China day. We do an art project, listen to music, look at photographs of famous monuments/ etc., and I have a Children's encyclopedia about children from around the world. We also eat a food from the different county. They learn a lot in just a few days! They make connections about, "Well, I have a seen a lady with a dot on her head in Kroger!" Then we talk about how the United States is unique because we borrow all of the special and unique things from other countries.

    So I start by the big picture....

    Then I zoom in to our local town. We discuss traditions/ customs and maps.

    We also read "Me on the Map". I have book a transparency mapping directions. The students practice compass directions using following the directions maps.

    We practice compass directions using games. We make treasure maps using directions. The students hide a treasure in an Easter egg and a partner has to find the correct Easter egg by following the directions.

    I always look at the State Standards to compare the extent something should be learned in which grade.
     
  7. Bored of Ed

    Bored of Ed Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2006
    Messages:
    2,230
    Likes Received:
    1

    Oct 14, 2007

    I love how you describe the ship project! I think I will borrow that idea for later in the unit when we actually get to explorers. Thanks! Until we get there, though... I am quite sure at least 4/6 kids have never learned anything about history or geography before. One, however, probably did and will be all like "been there, done that." My class is so random this year!
     
  8. Bored of Ed

    Bored of Ed Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2006
    Messages:
    2,230
    Likes Received:
    1

    Oct 14, 2007

    Firstgrade -- Interesting, most people do it the other way, starting with local mapping and then going global. That's what my principal recommended to me.

    I'm still debating whether to bother with compass directions at all. It's a good thing to teach, but I'm afraid it might frustrate the kids for no good reason.

    What is the title of your children around the world book? Maybe I can find something like that; should be interesting.

    Looking for "Me on the Map" right now... nypl site is being crabby tonight...
     
  9. firstgradeteach

    firstgradeteach Comrade

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2007
    Messages:
    450
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 14, 2007

    I teach it first for two reasons ...because of Columbus Day. :) It helps them understand the holiday better. Instead of just saying, "Columbus left his country to discover America." We have already discussed unique things about other countries. This year it was a week before Columbus Day so it worked out well.
    And.. because of our literacy program it is the only time I can fit in the BIG unit without taking a break in the 90 minute morning reading section.
    I also do not teach about mapping or naming all of the continents when doing the countires. We discuss what is a map, and a globe and point things out on it. Of course we ask, "Where do we live?" OHIO! Then I ask, "What country?" UNITED STATES. That as far as we go with it. We point it out on the map and globe. I do get questions like, "But where is Florida?" They usually recognize it and someone can come up and point it out. We say, now what country is that in? "UNITED STATES!"

    The Encyclopedia is at school..... I want to say that the publisher is DK... and it is something like Children Around the World. I jsut looked on Amazon and cannot find it...
     
  10. firstgradeteach

    firstgradeteach Comrade

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2007
    Messages:
    450
    Likes Received:
    0
  11. MissR

    MissR Comrade

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2005
    Messages:
    272
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 15, 2007

    We sing a continents and oceans song in first grade. It was written by one of my team members to the tune of Oh My Darling Clementine:

    There are seven, there are seven, there are seven continents.
    There are seven, there are seven, there are seven continents.
    North America, South America, Europe and Asia
    Africa, Australia, and Antarctica

    We sing it every morning and each week we switch who gets to point out the continents as they are sung.

    The oceans part:

    There are four oceans, there are four oceans, there are four oceans on the earth.
    Pacific Ocean, Atlantic Ocean, Arctic Ocean, Indian.
    repeat

    (Although the IHO has included the Southern Ocean as an ocean in their most current edition of Limits of Oceans and Seas, it has not yet been adopted, so we only sing the 4 oceans for now.)

    5 Oceans adaptation:

    There are five oceans, there are five oceans, there are five oceans on the earth.
    Pacific, Atlantic, Arctic, Southern, Indian.
     
  12. Bored of Ed

    Bored of Ed Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2006
    Messages:
    2,230
    Likes Received:
    1

    Oct 15, 2007

    I don't care if my kids remember the names of the continents or anything, but I'd like them to know that on the globe/map, there are oceans and land... When asked where they live, they can tell you sketchily how to get there, or recite their address, but when asked what city: "America." State? "Brooklyn" Street? some knew, some didn't. Not good. They are 10 years old and though they all have some kind of LD, they are not dumb. Just very behind in concepts.

    I brought a globe into the classroom today just to get their curiosity flowing. We noted a few major features, such as that it's mostly water ("What do we call these huge areas of water?" "Rivers!" :rolleyes:)

    I also started with past/present/future, focusing on past, then told them that History= things that happened in the past. I tried asking them about the history of the past week, but they were gone by then. (hyper-wise, I mean) Oh, well, a couple of minutes of globewatching ain't bad for a day's work :p
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. Backroads,
  2. MrsC,
  3. miss-m,
  4. Jeremy Provost
Total: 352 (members: 4, guests: 320, robots: 28)
test