Interview tomorrow for preschool position - what does classroom management look like?

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by chuckie, Aug 11, 2009.

  1. chuckie

    chuckie Rookie

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    Aug 11, 2009

    I'm wondering what type of classroom management/discipline techniques work in preschool.

    I have a job interview tomorrow (wednesday) and that's the only part I'm iffy on.

    Any information about what has worked for you would be MOST appreciated!
     
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  3. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    Aug 11, 2009

    My big thing is logical consequences... if you throw a toy, you pick it up and then need to play with something else. If you can't play nicely with your friends, you need to go play by yourself. I'm also big on choices (or what the kids THINK is a choice)... If you don't want to sit nicely in the group, you have a a choice to stand in the circle instead, or sit in a chair outside of the group, where you're still able to participate but not bother anyone else. You can clean the Legos up NOW, or you can clean them up during music time. That sort of thing.

    Firm, consistent rules, and practice, practice, practice so they know what you expect.

    Does that help? ;)
     
  4. scarlet_begonia

    scarlet_begonia Comrade

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    Aug 11, 2009

    Like clarnet said, you have to be consistent. I will repeat myself a dozen time if needed. It can be frustrating, but you have to be calm and follow through at all times. Here are some steps you can quickly outline in your interview:

    1. I will work with the children to come up with a list of rules, probably 4 or 5. (Experts say even 5 is pushing it, but I usually have 6!)

    2. I will introduce a reward system to a) encourage the children to follow directions and b) give them a visual idea of how they are doing. I have done simple charts in the past such as the following: racetrack (you have to keep your car on the track), tree (keep your coconut on the tree), and cookie jar (keep your cookie in the jar.) I have done more detailed systems when I was still working on my classroom management skills. I did a star chart (can earn 5 stars a day, prize if earned 3 or more) and a smile chart (get a smile for different areas of the day such as circle time, naptime, cleaning up, etc.)

    3. I use my system FAITHFULLY but will try something different if it doesn't work.

    and

    4. The consequences correspond to the action. I do not redirect out of anger, and I never take away outside time or food (BIG BIG no-no! In fact, you can't do it in my state at all!)

    You can try any little system that works for you. This year, I'm starting off with a "class reward" system where they all have to work together to get the reward in addition to my individual system. I have a bunch of balloons on a paper and every time the kids clean up well, I will color a balloon. Then they'll get some reward once all the balloons are colored in.
     
  5. chuckie

    chuckie Rookie

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    Aug 12, 2009

    Excellent, thank you!

    What about safety issues such as hiting, biting or running out of the classroom?

    One last question - parents of criers - it never seems to be productive to me when the parents of criers hang around. The whole transtition seems to take longer. What do you think?

    Thanks so much.
     
  6. scarlet_begonia

    scarlet_begonia Comrade

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    Aug 12, 2009

    Hitting- separate the children, give a "talk" to the hitter. (Honestly, I give more of a lecture, but I wouldn't say that in the interview, but I really GET MY POINT ACROSS to the kid who hits!) Enlist help of office or parents if needed.

    Biting- never had a big problem with this, but a child at my son's daycare did when he was a baby. And my son was the bitee. At least 3x a week. I can say that you focus a little bit more on the bitee, but don't go overboard. You can create a situation where the bitee tries for more attention! You instruct the bitee to tell the biter "no!" Give the bitee a voice and teach them to tell the biter to not do it again.

    I had a runner once. She just became my buddy. Eventually, the other children helped me by pointing out the second she walked out the door.
     

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