Interview Question Help

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by ajd5160, Jan 17, 2008.

  1. ajd5160

    ajd5160 Rookie

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    Jan 17, 2008

    I've been teaching in an inner city PSA for 2 years. I am ready to move on to (hopefully) a suburban public school, but I am dreading one potential interview question:

    "Why are you seeking new employment?" or "Why are you leaving your current position", or any other variation of this question.

    I don't even know if I would be asked something like this, but I want to be prepared.

    I don't want to sound like I hate my current job, or that I can't handle it, or that I don't expect the same types of problems that I am currently facing at a new school. I think that there is probably something better out there than the lame "I am looking for new opportunities" answer.

    Any help or suggestions would be helpful!

    Thanks.
     
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  3. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Jan 19, 2008

    Usually honesty is best, particularly when it is presented diplomatically. Why are you leaving?
     
  4. missred4190

    missred4190 Comrade

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    Jan 20, 2008

    The fact is that most teachers are stronger in certain areas, in certain environments, ect. I am working in a more urban setting, and I love it. But I know that they have a high turnover rate too because many teachers are just not cut out for that. Maybe you could answer:

    "My previous position was very meaningful and challenging. Although I enjoyed it, I never quite felt at home, and I know that being completely comfortable in the teaching environment is a must if you are going to be the most effective teacher possible. I feel that this job is a much better fit for me and that I would be a great asset to your campus/district."

    I don't if this really sounds right, but if it includes honesty while still highlighting your desires to work in their district and a few of your strong points (such as finding meaning in teaching and your willingness to be the best at your job), surely it can't be too bad. That, and you want to get off that subject quickly too--so plan to redirect their questioning with your answer.

    No one is going to look at you and think, "she must be a terrible teacher if she doesn't want to teach at xyz school." No, probably most will completly understand because you are not the first nor the last to recognize that it isn't the best place for you. And if it isn't the best place--then you do need to move on to somewhere that works for you so you can work for the students.
     
  5. corps2005

    corps2005 Cohort

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    Jan 20, 2008

    Could you just say that you are relocating and would like to find a position closer to home?
     
  6. trayums

    trayums Enthusiast

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    Jan 20, 2008

    I think you should be truthful for the most part. The worst interview I sat in on was when a woman told us that she wanted to teach at our school so that she could be closer to New York City and take advantage of that. It wasn't what the team wanted to hear as it made it sound like she wouldn't be 100% invested in teaching and being a part of the school community. Avoid that! :) Honesty is typically the best policy.
     

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