Interview at a "traditional" school (Saxon, Spalding, back to basics) question

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by kassrose, May 23, 2010.

  1. kassrose

    kassrose Companion

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    May 23, 2010

    Hey everyone,
    I'm interviewing at a traditional school this week. They are calling themselves a "back to basics" school. What does that mean? They use Saxon math and Spalding language arts. I am just looking for some insight. Has anyone work at a school like this? Pros/cons? I'm a pretty creative person so I am hesitant about the Saxon/Spalding since I know they are scripted.
    Thanks!
     
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  3. jwteacher

    jwteacher Cohort

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    May 23, 2010

    If I had to guess, it sounds more like a teacher-centered than a student-centered school. I would investigate their website to find out as much information about their philosophy as I could.

    I've never heard of a school call themselves "back to basics."
     
  4. awreed

    awreed New Member

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    May 24, 2010

    Saxon Math Does Allow For Creativity

    Before I waste your time with meaningless advice, what grade levels will you be teaching?

    AWR
     
  5. ms.

    ms. Comrade

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    May 24, 2010

    I've been to a school that sounds similar to this. They focused on the "Three R's" Reading, Writing and Math. I was a science/social studies teacher at this school. Little to say, I was not a big fan. :D My kids had no idea what country they lived in, or even that the earth rotated around the sun (and not vice-versa.) It was tough to teach the concept of what a country is, when students have never learned this before sixth grade. I had no background knowledge to build on.

    The schools did have relatively high reading and math state test scores. I am a bit biased, being a science/social-studies teacher! :) It wasn't all bad, just not my cup of tea.
     
  6. newbie23

    newbie23 Comrade

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    May 24, 2010

    Sounds similar to my school (only our test scores are less than stellar).

    We use Saxon Math which I do enjoy sometimes due to it's repetitive nature. I also wish though that the lessons built on each other a little more consistently (one day we should learn telling time to the hour, then sometime within the next week we need to tell it to the quarter hour instead of 2 months later).

    We use a basal program. Guided reading is not the preferred method of instruction. Whole-class instruction is generally pushed along with 30 minutes of intervention a day (centers, small groups, etc.) Differentiation is something that is considered "new and unproven."

    I don't particularly think that it's best for students but it caters to the static and slow-to-change faculty. I'm still the "newbie" so when I try to implement something new even just in my classroom, it's discouraged.

    Not the happiest place to work but I assure you, there are ways to work around it. It is a job and it is experience, beyond that, I don't know what to tell you.
     
  7. kassrose

    kassrose Companion

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    May 24, 2010

    It's a brand new school, so if hired I would have my pick of grade levels. Generally, I prefer 2-4. I would be willing to teach kinder, for example, if it allowed for slightly more creativity.

    What do you suggest?
     

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