Interventions for "silly"/"careless" reading errors?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Elizabeth B, Jan 27, 2018.

  1. Elizabeth B

    Elizabeth B New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2018
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 27, 2018

    I have about half my class who are below grade level in their reading due to accuracy. We use DIBELS, and the middle of the year goal is 96% accuracy. We are asked to focus on accuracy before moving on to anything else, but I have about 10 students who are just stuck. When they read, they make "silly" errors: leaving off word endings, skipping small words, making plurals into singular, etc. If I have them re-read a sentence or a word they can correct themselves no problem, but when they test they go along and make these errors again (and don't self-correct). Some of these students are high ELLs.

    I've been providing lots of practice and feedback, done things like unison read and read-repeat, even tried to make it a game where they "battle" me and do damage for every word read correctly to help motivate them to be careful, but they just keep making the same mistakes! The school is looking at why my students aren't improving (some of them got WORSE in their accuracy from the beginning of the year), and I am out of ideas to help them. Part of me wonders if I should find something to help them focus on just ONE word at a time (something that blocks out the rest of the words), but I don't know where to find this or if it would work. My principal suggests phonics instruction, but the kids I'm talking about can decode fine if they are asked the word in isolation or asked to re-read.

    I tried searching the net, but most of what I can find seem to be people helping with little math errors or with phonics errors. Either that or they just say to do repeated readings, which I've already been doing. I asked my team what they do, and it's exactly the same as I've been doing.

    Any ideas?
     
  2.  
  3. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Messages:
    6,330
    Likes Received:
    2,219

    Jan 27, 2018

    Have them point to the words when reading them.

    This can happen for a few different reasons. Some are part of normal development and other times it signals continuing struggle.

    If their eyes are reading faster than they can say the words, this can happen. This may be part of being able to read faster but not adjusting what they are doing. For accurate oral reading they will need a way to connect the two.

    If they struggle with reading words in context (not instantaneously), they may predict as part of reading and this may indicate still needing individual word work. Monitoring the types of errors the student is making may give you better indication.

    They may just be rushing to show how good they are making them do worse.
     
    Obadiah likes this.
  4. Elizabeth B

    Elizabeth B New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2018
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 27, 2018

    Pointing as they read is already a part of the testing protocol and what we do during our reading. This is why I was considering trying to find something that blocks their view of the surrounding words. I wonder if they are pointing but looking at the surrounding words and it's taking their focus away from current words.
     
  5. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Messages:
    6,330
    Likes Received:
    2,219

    Jan 27, 2018

    If they can instantaneously read the words they are getting wrong during the assessments, then you are right, they may be looking ahead. They can break the habit but it requires that they slow down when oral reading.

    What do they say? Make sure they know that you aren't upset at them and you are both playing detective to figure it out.
     
  6. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2002
    Messages:
    18,938
    Likes Received:
    682

    Jan 27, 2018

    Have you seen those short rulers with a clear colored piece of acetate across the top? The rules goes under the line of text with the acetate highlighting the line. It would be worth a try.

    Of course, some of them may just need glasses.
     
  7. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Messages:
    6,330
    Likes Received:
    2,219

    Jan 27, 2018

    Close up reading issues and eye-teaming problems tend to go unnoticed and schools don't check for that even if they do eye and hearing screenings.
     
  8. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2002
    Messages:
    18,938
    Likes Received:
    682

    Jan 27, 2018

    Oh, I know schools don't. My tutoring student who skipped words frequently was found to need glasses and they have helped.
     
  9. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2002
    Messages:
    3,274
    Likes Received:
    38

    Jan 28, 2018

    So on DIBELS they don't have 96% accuracy? Remember that DIBELS is only an INDICATOR of what a student can do at that point in time. It isn't always the best indicator. I have found that many of my students don't have the background knowledge to fully understand some of the texts, which may have an impact on their accuracy. I have a love/hate relationship with DIBELS and strongly feel that it should only be one data point that helps us to make instructional decisions about our students. It shouldn't be the only thing that is helping us to make instructional decisions, what do other data points show about these kiddos? Classroom observations? Unit/weekly tests? Other standardized assessments?

    Think about your students who are below benchmark on DIBELS. What is their accuracy and comprehension like on authentic text? Can they read and comprehend authentic, grade level texts, with 96% accuracy?
     
    Backroads likes this.
  10. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Messages:
    6,330
    Likes Received:
    2,219

    Jan 28, 2018

    Depending on what you are assessing, I think authentic text that they can easily predict what the word might be would be flawed if assessing the ability to read any words with fluency.

    The idea of using authentic text or even well known text for comprehension can inflate scores. For example, using a text about Egyptians after the curriculum has covered Egyptians 3 times over the years makes assessing comprehension using such texts unreliable. Unless the text gives false information, many comprehension questions can be answered based on prior knowledge. That is not showing a true assessment of the student's comprehension of text.

    Same goes for accuracy and fluency. If students use prior knowledge to predict text, it is hard to tease what is showing the students ability to decode fluently and accurately and their prior knowledge of sentence structure, grammar, and vocabulary.
     
  11. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2002
    Messages:
    3,274
    Likes Received:
    38

    Jan 28, 2018

    But how often do we read text that we know nothing about? Having some background knowledge helps us to learn new knowledge.

    We are always learning to read, no matter how old we are.

    There are pros and cons to using an assessment such as DIBELS, DRA, QRI, or authentic text. No one assessment is perfect. All give us insights into what a particular student can do and what they need to learn next.
     
  12. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Messages:
    6,330
    Likes Received:
    2,219

    Jan 28, 2018

    There are many times I read novel information. If you would like to split hairs over how much background information, feel free, but in general, if students are to read something where they have tons of background knowledge and know almost everything they are reading about, you really aren't testing reading comprehension but knowledge of the subject. If a student can answer the comprehension questions without reading the text, you aren't testing reading comprehension.

    No, we are not always learning how to read.
     
  13. Been There

    Been There Habitué

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2017
    Messages:
    849
    Likes Received:
    518

    Jan 30, 2018

    According to my experience, when older students continue to make the errors that you describe, they usually are not fully engaged and are not reading for comprehension. Try this approach to see if it makes a difference in their reading accuracy. Set up a PowerPoint presentation consisting of three slides. First, you'll need to insert either a photo or an animated gif cartoon onto the second slide (whichever one you prefer). On the first slide, show a sentence that the student should be able to read: The monkey is hanging from a tree in the forest. On the second slide, show the same sentence along with a photo or animated cartoon of a monkey hanging from a tree. On the third slide, show the same sentence, but without the photo or animated gif. If the student is able to read the sentence correctly on the second slide, then he/she should be able to read the sentence correctly on the third slide.

    TIP: Begin by modeling the activity with another student (who is already familiar with the method) - model different examples two or three more times while your student is watching and listening.

    Now have your student who tends to make silly errors try it. Practice this 3-step method with several other animations to help the student to get into the habit of reading for comprehension - the tendency for making "silly" errors should diminish significantly. Of course, follow-up review and practice will ensure success for all.
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2018
  14. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2011
    Messages:
    3,781
    Likes Received:
    241

    Feb 2, 2018

    I second the idea to do an error analysis and see if the words being missed have any similarities, either in terms of phonics patterns or otherwise (e.g., really long words, plural endings left off, etc.).

    I like the idea of a ruler (or even sheet of cardboard with word-size hole cut out) to isolate particular words for the student to focus on. You might then have a student read each word three times in that particular intervention, then tally whether s/he got the word right on the first attempt. Create a game where a word read on the first attempt is worth 3 points, second attempt is worth 2 points, third attempt 1 point, and 0 points for incorrect answer.

    Gradually, you could have the student read each word fewer times (e.g., move to two times per word, then one), and you could also gradually make the word box bigger and have them read two words at a time, then three.

    Whenever I teach any skill, the first task is always to break the task up into increasingly smaller subskills and learning context expectations (e.g., number of attempts to get correct) until the child is successful at a high rate, then gradually increase expectations. If accuracy drops off, you know you've moved too fast in some area (e.g., introduction of new skills, removal of learning assists, etc.)
     
  15. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2015
    Messages:
    1,358
    Likes Received:
    843

    Feb 3, 2018

    I've also observed that what seems like a careless error to us, as adults, makes plenty of sense to a student at that point in her/his learning.
     
    EdEd likes this.

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 188 (members: 2, guests: 164, robots: 22)
test