Intervention Teacher

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by John Lee, Sep 5, 2013.

  1. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    What is the difference, in an (hourly) "Intervention Teacher", vs. a special ed Teacher in a contracted role (i.e. w/Special Education credential)? Does anyone have any experience in such a role, or have an Intervention Teacher at their school, and can share what the job entails day-to-day?

    I have an impromptu interview tomorrow, and I'm a bit at a loss as to what I should know. In the districts I've worked in, we have Learning Centers... staffed by credentialed, Special Education teachers. In my research with this district, I don't see anything like that. For my part, I have no special certification other than my preliminary credential, nor any resources (special education programs, curricula) that I can bring to the position.

    All I want is an idea of what I'm supposed to be, as I head into the interview tomorrow. I don't want to go in like a clueless bozo. And I certainly don't want to waste my time, driving 1/2 hour and putting on my monkey suit, for nothing. Truth is, I don't even know that it is for this Intervention position I'm talking about. I just saw that posting for this on the district website, and figure that is what it is for. The P (who I e-mailed earlier in the summer) simply e-mailed me out of the blue, whether I'd be interested in a "part-time teaching position."
     
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  3. Preschool0929

    Preschool0929 Cohort

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    At my school, we have reading and math intervention teachers. They pull students out of class either individually or in small groups and work on whatever skills they need. It's separate from special Ed and these are not students with IEPs, just students that teachers/assessment scores recommend for extra help. Most of our intervention teachers are either para educators or some are just certified teachers who work part time.
     
  4. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    OK, that gives me an idea of it. In researching a bit more, of course there are resource specialists on staff. So I would imagine it a lot as you explained. Is the work (small group, individual) basically work as defined by the classroom teacher? e.g. Would a lot of it just be catch-up on class work, or re-read stories they are reading as a class? Or is there a component where I (as the intervention teacher) would be responsible for designing, planning? Remember, this position is hourly.

    Thanks for the input.
     
  5. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    I can't offer a single thing other than crossed fingers and good wishes for your interview!
     
  6. Preschool0929

    Preschool0929 Cohort

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    I've heard it done differently depending on the school. A friend of mine is hourly, but still responsible for creating her own lesson plans for each group she has. At my current school, intervention teachers are also responsible for planning their own activities based on state standards and what each grade level is working on. The classroom teacher doesn't plan intervention or have much input except making recommendations for which students need help. It's not used as a 'catch up on class work' . I've seen intervention teachers do pull out groups and review blends or letter sounds flash cards, play addition games, or work on sight/spelling words.
     
  7. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    Thanks Alice, I appreciate that.
     
  8. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    In my experiences, interventionists typically work with one to five students on skills they're lacking using material NOT provided by the regular classroom. Usually they have a specific program they use with students. There is a good deal of testing involved. Again, my experiences.
     
  9. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

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    Ours work with kids in tier 3 interventions. They aren't in SPED, but are struggling a great deal. Most districts have a prescribed program that you have to follow exactly. I agree that there is a lot of assessment.
     
  10. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    Our intervention teachers work with students who are behind but not identified for sped. They pull groups of kids out for 45 minutes at a time and they follow a scripted intervention program. So once you understand how the program works, there isn't really any planning to do other than looking things over because you're just following the next steps outlined by the program. Usually students are sent to these interventions through RtI, so our intervention teachers are heavily involved in that process. They progress monitor students weekly and keep track of data, which they would present at RtI meetings. Any knowledge you have in that area would be great to share in your interview. The progress monitoring assessments are all something that you "grade" while the student is completing it (such as an ORF) so there aren't things to take home and grade in my experience. They also don't really have any extra paperwork other than the progress monitoring. From what I've seen the work is something that really can be done all in school/in contract hours. I just wanted to point that out in case you were worried about being paid hourly vs. salaried.
     
  11. Lynnnn725

    Lynnnn725 Connoisseur

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    Our intervention teacher does LLI (Fountas and Pinnell leveled literacy intervention) with students below level. She pulls the same kids 5 days/week. She is a certified teacher and just does reading groups all. day. long.
    The students are not SPED.
     
  12. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    Thanks for the input, all. The consensus seems to be a prescribed program, and the role being primarily based on reading (i.e. not math, other subjects). I kind of figured that, and have been going over reading-related questions and experiences I've had.

    It is hard preparing for an interview where you don't really know (specifically) what you're interviewing for ("part-time teacher" is all I was told). I'm hoping to be pleasantly surprised. Thanks again.
     
  13. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    How did it go?
     
  14. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

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    Yes, how did it go? We do have a math invention teacher too.
     
  15. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    Bombed it Alice.
    I left the interview questioning my own ability, and feeling like she thought I was out of my league applying to her school. At various points during our talk, she seemed to question my potential commitment, she said I'm no spring chicken, she questioned my knowledge, and criticized my posture (said I should sit up straighter, project more confidence).
     
  16. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Ouch.
     
  17. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    "No spring chicken"???????

    Lovely.

    I would say you've dodged a bullet.
     
  18. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    I don't think she meant any of it as an attack. She seemed to be just a hard-driving, aggressive type. I think she meant it all as constructive... and I do appreciate feedback, even if a bit harsh. Still, I've never left an interview feeling as inadequate. I'll get over this one, because I know I'm a good teacher. And you're probably right anyway (dodged a bullet).

    Thanks for the advice still.
     
  19. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    John, from what I remember, you're in CA, correct? That type of position (interventionist/clinician) is very common here.

    My interventionists work part time (3.75 hours a day). They earn nearly $40/hour; however, they do not get health benefits. They work with grades K-3rd or 4th/5th and do 30-60 minute "rotations" that focus on reading/language arts. Not all their groups are low functioning/Tier III; in fact, a couple of their groups are "challenge" students who are working far above grade-level.
     
  20. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Sep 7, 2013

    Actually, this topic came up in an employment workshop. There is all kinds of ways to promote yourself when you are "no spring chicken" and a question like that is a time to explore what makes that a great asset.
     

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