Intervention Specialist - what do they do at your school?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by teacherguy111, Jan 14, 2015.

  1. teacherguy111

    teacherguy111 Cohort

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    Jan 14, 2015

    I made a similar post in the past but didn't get many responses. What do intervention specialists do in your school? I know the experiences are different in different schools. Obviously they spend time writing IEPs etc, but what about day to day duties? Do they mostly pull out? Co-teach? Check in with students etc.

    At my school the intervention teachers sometimes come into classes that have high percentages of IEP students. They do not typically do much pull out. They also provide reading services for students that need to have tests read to them.

    What about at your school?
     
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  3. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    I have a close bond with my SpEd co-teacher. She usually takes one day a week to focus on skill-building workshops when we both notice a trending deficit. She also grades the majority of assignments for students with reading and writing IEP goals. We lesson plan together and really talk about each student's needs and progress. I'm told, unfortunately, that most of the other teachers aren't as actively involved in the process.
     
  4. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    I think one issue is that "intervention specialist" isn't necessarily a consistent term across districts, states, etc. I've worked across a few states and in one an intervention specialist may be more of a behavioral support person, while in some may refer more to a Tier II RtI academic person, etc. Maybe in other states it's a more common term?
     
  5. teacherguy111

    teacherguy111 Cohort

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    Catnfiddle sounds like you work very closely with your intervention specialist. I am trying to work out if I want to add an intervention endorsement to my license.
     
  6. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Ours pulls small groups/individuals, but also heads a team devoted to coming up with interventions. The team meets once a month, and teacher struggling with students can seek ideas and possibly start the process for more official intervention.
     
  7. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    Your intervention specialist might be called something else in another school. Anything regarding "intervention" at my school is usually regarding behavior.
     
  8. Emily Bronte

    Emily Bronte Groupie

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    This is a behavior support person in my state and not a special education teacher/IEP manager.
     
  9. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    In Ohio, where it says the OP is from, special ed teachers are called intervention specialists. I think I answered your first post, haha. I do all pull outs, but "full inclusion" is extremely popular in OH. I would expect that you would be coteaching unless you work with a severe needs population.
     
  10. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    In my district, "interventionists" are responsible for tier II or III academic interventions in a pull-out setting, as well as entering data from those interventions. They are considered support staff, and, although most are certified teachers, they are not considered to be in certified teaching positions.

    SPED teachers, on the other hand, do mostly pull-out instruction with some response to behavior crisis when needed. They also spend A LOT of time in meetings and doing case manager work.
     
  11. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    This isn't a term my district uses....not sure what the equivalent would be.:confused:
     
  12. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    The intervention teacher in my district is the classroom teacher. We don't have any help. I'm jealous of those of you who do.
     
  13. karebear76

    karebear76 Habitué

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    Ohio uses the job title Intervention Specialist to refer to a licensed educator who works with students with disabilities. I do mainly replacement curriculum instruction. I have done pull out and inclusion. I prefer what I do to inclusion, but I also feel that many students are left behind.
     
  14. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    We use Title I money for it. Other buildings in our district (that aren't Title I schools), don't have the interventionists that I mentioned in my previous post. Honestly though, I think many of us feel like it's a waste of money. We'd rather have the students in our class with us doing the interventions ourselves than having them be pulled out all the time. Maybe if the logistics were different, we'd feel differently, but, with the logistics the way they are right now, it just doesn't make sense to spend the money on the extra staff. I have students who are only one or two levels below where they should be going to the interventionists while I sit around twirling my thumbs (not really) because I'm waiting for students to return to my room so that I can provide them with instruction. In most cases, I just don't see the point. I think my instruction overall would be much better if I didn't have to work around so many pull-out schedules.
     
  15. teacherguy111

    teacherguy111 Cohort

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    Sorry for the confusion. I was talking about special ed teachers. In Ohio they are called intervention specialists.
     
  16. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    I have to admit that the change in title confused the heck out of me when I moved here from PA.
     
  17. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    In that case, intervention specialist and special ed teachers are two different things, though they do work together.

    I've been in another school where it was all handled a bit differently, but in my current school the special ed teachers handle a lot of the curriculum. We meet regularly to discuss in class intervention, but we look to the special ed teachers kind of lead the instruction as they are specially trained for interventions.

    The people I mentioned before are rather a front group we go to before the special ed teachers.
     

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