interesting editorial on CA charter schools

Discussion in 'General Education' started by yarnwoman, Jul 9, 2011.

  1. yarnwoman

    yarnwoman Cohort

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    Jul 9, 2011

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  3. scmom

    scmom Enthusiast

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    Jul 9, 2011

    That is interesting - I wonder if there is a difference between public school charters and private school charters? Our principal has told me on numerous occasions they follow all the rules the other schools do and they actually have to jump through more hoops and are scrutinized more. Hmmmm.....maybe the district we run through required that or they put it in the original charter or ?
     
  4. yellowdaisies

    yellowdaisies Fanatic

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    Interesting...I actually thought this was already happening in CA...I guess not.

    scmom - what is a private charter? I have only ever heard of public charters.
     
  5. scmom

    scmom Enthusiast

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    I have heard of two types of private charters - corporate and a group of parents and teachers getting together to form their own charter not affiliated with a school district.
     
  6. yellowdaisies

    yellowdaisies Fanatic

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    Oh, ok, thank you! That makes sense! :)

    Does that mean private charters can filter applicants like a private school? Do they charge tuition?
     
  7. yarnwoman

    yarnwoman Cohort

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    When I read this I was wondering what the BIG difference was. At teh public charter I am at we are always told that we need to follow the same things that the district school have to. For example the new rules for teaching about homosexuals in the classroom we will have to do as well.
     
  8. scmom

    scmom Enthusiast

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    Some charters have set boundaries,, but then do lotteries to accept more students, like regular schools in our area. From what I understand, but have no direct experience with, there are also ones who don't have set boundaries and just take people who apply. Their money is filtered from the state or a overseeing body, but not a school district. I think if you accept public money, you have to follow public school rules but I need to know more about the corporate charters people back east keep talking about but I am not familiar with.
     
  9. Mrs.SLF

    Mrs.SLF Comrade

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    Jul 9, 2011

    Here on the east coast (or at least the DC area), the charter schools receive pupil money like the public schools for the students enrolled in their school by the end of September, typically. The charters, however, are usually backed by some NPO that is able to get corporate donations in order to provide additional funding for the programs that set the charter apart like extended day/year, trips, etc. I just accepted a position in a charter school that operates an extended day and year that is backed by an NPO in New England.

    Now, in the state of Maryland, charter law is different and charter schools are entities of the local school system. Not all school systems allow charters (Montgomery, in particular, has resisted them but there has been an application put before the board that I'm waiting to see what happens) but the ones that do (like Baltimore City where I began my teaching career) are very much in oversight with regards to the charter. In fact, charter school teachers in Baltimore are paid on the same scale as the city and are protected by the BTU (union). Essentially, charter schools in Baltimore function to provide curriculum alternatives to what was being mandated by the local school system. Some schools also provide extended day activities and such. In order for the school to be approved, they have to have a set plan that shows the school's viability. The first school I taught in was backed by a managing organization while the second school I taught in was created by parents in the area that wanted an alternative to a school that did nothing but test prep/drills. We do have a lot of the national charter school organizations around here like KIPP that have fairly successful schools.

    Also, I don't want to speak for the entire coast and should change it to my region, specifically.
     

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