Inexpensive materials for library

Discussion in 'Early Childhood Education Archives' started by braun123, Oct 20, 2005.

  1. braun123

    braun123 New Member

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    Oct 20, 2005

    I am a student at the University of Wisconsin and am doing a project for my pre-k curriculum class. I was wondering if any of you had suggestions for inexpensive materials that I could incorporate into the library/writing center for a preschool classroom. Thanks so much.
     
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  3. Mr. Mike

    Mr. Mike Rookie

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    Oct 20, 2005

    what do you mean? how can you make something cheap for library center
     
  4. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    Oct 20, 2005

    Yeah! Another cheesehead! Are you at UW-Madison? I went to UW-Eau Claire.

    I think I may know what you're asking. If I'm wrong, let me know.

    *Put laminated nameplates and wipe off markers out to have students trace and write their names
    *Lay out books and reader rods and ask them to build words from the books

    Is this kind of what you're looking for?
     
  5. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Oct 20, 2005

    I get lots of stuff at thrift stores. Note cards for 10 cents, pack of writing paper for 49 cents. You can cut tag board into bookmarks for them to decorate. Leftover bulletin board boarders could also be used. Newspaper words can be cut out. Old falling apart books can be cut up for various purposes (continuing a story, changing a paragraph, describing a character, etc). Old calendar pages with great pictures can be used for descriptive writing prompts.
     
  6. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    Oct 21, 2005

    Those are some good ideas Upsadaisy!
     
  7. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Thank you, JenPooh!
     
  8. hatima

    hatima Devotee

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    Oct 21, 2005

    Scholastic has thir book fliers (which are usually cheeper than stores) The main covers have Classroom library sets. I just ordered a set of 100 and a set of 50 to start mine. It was about a dollar per book, the books are random but most are good quality. I ordered for upper elementary but I am sure they have this for lower elementary too.
    A classmate of mine told me online auction sites have excellent deals.
     
  9. scarlet_begonia

    scarlet_begonia Comrade

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    Oct 21, 2005

    My kids love to make "books" and they love to waste paper! I cut copy paper in half, fold in half, and staple the two pieces together at the fold. This way, they're more likely to use the WHOLE piece of paper rather than scribble on one little corner. You can get stampers at the dollar store. Sometimes offices throw out message pads when they switch to a new format. You know, those "while you were out" pads? Order pads are good for the kids to take to dramatic play. For a treat, I'll give my kids a few sentence strips and let them go crazy :) They love that for some reason.
     
  10. knittingbec

    knittingbec Comrade

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    Oct 21, 2005

    I teach 1st grade at a Non-Profit Organization where most of our materials are hand-me-downs. In our reading center right now, I have the following teacher made items:
    -a gift-wrapped box (I used shiny paper called "Mylar" -i think- because it will last longer) with 4 pockets. My pockets are currently labeled with ? and . with one pocket for the answer key and one pocket for sentence strips with missing punctuation. You could adapt this for anything, though. Vowels/consonants, one syllable/2 syllables, animal word/color word, etc.. They take the strips out of the main pocket, read the words on the card, put it in the correct pocket and can check their own answers when they're all done.
    -I wrote out and laminated some nursery rhymes, leaving some words blank. I used nursery rhymes because many of my first graders aren't reading and they know these by memory. (It would actually probably be more successful in your room... my first graders are "AmerAsians" and some have not had much American culture in their lives). Anyway, I have word cards with the missing words. They fill in the blanks and then flip the cards over to see if the numbers read in the correct order. I also have the same type of thing with simple poems with the rhyming word left off.
    -I also save the fronts of cereal boxes, cracker boxes, etc. I write sentences on the back, cut them apart and then the students put them in order. Again, these are self-checking- the kids flip the pieces over and see if the cereal box is put together right. I have one set of these for story sequencing, one for sentence-structure, and one for ABC order.
     
  11. Butterfly4

    Butterfly4 Comrade

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    Oct 21, 2005

    I like to make books with my kids to put in our library center. I pick a theme, have the kids color a picture and I write a quote from them about the theme. Laminate or contact paper each picture and then I have Kinko's put a spiral bind on it for $3 to $4. The kids love our homemaid books in the center.

    An exampls: Last week was fire safety week, they all colored a picture of a fire truck. At the top I wrote Firefighter (child's name) says " " and each child quoted a fire safety rule. For more fun, I took pictures of the kids in a fire hat and put their picture above their colored fire truck, but that gets more expensive.

    I think next month We will do a book about what we are thankful for, or draw hand turkeys and have each child tell me what their turkey's name is and make a little book of it.
     
  12. Danny'sNanny

    Danny'sNanny Connoisseur

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    Oct 22, 2005

    The kindergarteners I worked with last year loved to practice writing in a pan of salt. I would just pour a thin layer of table salt in a baking pan with low sides and they could write whatever letters we were working on.
     
  13. Mr. Mike

    Mr. Mike Rookie

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    Oct 22, 2005

    As a lesson for circle time and art you have the kids go around doing verse after verse of there own brown bear brown bear.
     
  14. srh

    srh Devotee

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    Oct 22, 2005

    Just a note about sentence strips. I found some last spring that are "dry erase." They're so cool, and now reusable! I bought a pack of sentence strips and a pack of phrase strips...they come in colors too!
     

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