Individual White Boards/Shower boards

Discussion in 'General Education' started by pwhatley, Jul 16, 2007.

  1. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    I have a couple of questions, because I have never seen these being used:

    1. If using Shower Board, how big do the individual boards need to be?

    2. Other than math equations (and I'm really showing my lack of imagination here), how would you use them?

    Thanks for the info!
    Blessings
     
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  3. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    They are great for any quick check question... What's the noun in this sentence? Who was president during the Civil War? Stuff like that. It's a fun review.

    My problem is that the older children tend to write or draw, um, inappropriate things on their boards to get a laugh when they hold them up. :p
     
  4. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    I can see that they would (draw stuff). After all, it is during the developmental stages when we (teachers) have them (students) that they begin learning things like loyalty, peer pressure, and HUMOR! I'm still trying to picture it in my head. Do you ask the question, then they write down what they think the answer is, then they all hold up their boards together and those who got the answer right get a point? (Kind of like the old Newlyweds game). Sorry I'm so dense.
     
  5. Teaching Grace

    Teaching Grace Connoisseur

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    have them write answers as you ask questions. you could do it with spelling, grammar, having them copy a sentence and then fix it, there are tons and tons of things you can do with them! i'm having mine cut into 12 x 12 squares
     
  6. born2teach84

    born2teach84 Comrade

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    I use them when I teach cursive, I teach a letter and then we pratice on the boards, saves paper. I also use them in reading groups to do CROP-QV and have them answer questions. I use them in math of course to answer problems. In centers the students use them to play spelling hangman and work on flash card problems. The kids use them to do mock spelling tests on each other.

    I use them any time I need to see something but don't want to waste paper. I love having them around.

    I made my 1 foot by 1 foot. That seemed like enough room for them to write what they needed.
     
  7. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I got the biggest board available at Home Depot and had it cut into rectangular pieces about 15x20. The people who cut the boards can tell you how to get the most pieces out of a single sheet. I've found that size doesn't matter too much (hee!).

    I use them for review games in a Jeopardy! format. I'll ask them to give me a particular Roman numeral or vocabulary word or the name of the first emperor--whatever we're reviewing at the time. It's great to do when we have an extra 5 or 10 minutes at the end of class.

    I give points to the kid who gives the correct response the fastest. Sometimes for harder questions I'll tell them to hang on to their boards and not show me until I ask, and then I'll give points to everyone who got it right. To keep everyone involved, even the kids who aren't as quick, I sometimes give out points based on class ("Okay, our winner for that question was a sophomore, so all you sophomores... give yourself one point and give Francisco a round of applause!"), or gender, or whether you were wearing tennis shoes or glasses or earrings or have a tattoo. The kids LOVE when we do this!

    I often award extra credit points to the winners, like a bonus point or two on the next quiz.
     
  8. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Oh, and bandnerdtx: are you currently teaching band? I was a band nerd for over 12 years, and loved every minute of it! I played french horn and flugel horn in Marching, Concert, and Jazz Bands and Orchestra. Did I have a life outside of band? Not so much, lol!
     
  9. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Oh, and the individual whiteboards are a form of ongoing informal assessment, so be sure to put that in your lesson plans and on your evaluations!
     
  10. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Wow! Thanks for the scenarios! That really helped. Okay, so size really DOESN'T matter, Lol! Okay, if we are departmentalized (or even not), do I make boards for ALL students to carry around with them, or do they stay in the classroom?

    Born2teach84: What is CROP-QV? I've never heard of it.
     
  11. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Absolutely! All of my instructors have dwelled extensively on "authentic" assessment, whether formal or informal, but they never mentioned this! It is probably so common that they didn't think of it!
     
  12. Teaching Grace

    Teaching Grace Connoisseur

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    have them write the answer, hold it up, then you check it out and have them put it down so that others don't copy
     
  13. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    PW, no, I'm not a band director. I teach English! I'm in a community band here in Houston, though. I play the flute (and percussion, sorta).
     
  14. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    They stay in your class as a class set.

    You should also plan to find something to use as erasers. Some teachers here use Dollar Store sponges, dry and cut up. I use plain old washcloths from Wal-Mart--20 for $3 on sale. I keep the washcloths in a decorative basket in the classroom next to the white boards, and I take them home periodically and bleach them.

    I require all students to have one dry erase marker (any color except yellow) as part of their regular class materials brought to class every day.
     
  15. Teaching Grace

    Teaching Grace Connoisseur

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    keep them in your room or they'll never make it back to you
     
  16. born2teach84

    born2teach84 Comrade

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    CROP-QV is a reading strategy we teach our children. It stands for:

    Connection
    Reaction
    Oppinion
    Prediction
    Question
    Visualization

    We start the year by teaching this strategy. They write it on paper and react to a story by making connection, predictions, asking questions, having oppinions, visualizing what they read. It helps them through the tests but mainly helps makes better readers.

    (this is a short summerization of what CROP QV is. We do alot with this acronym but this is the main gist.)
     
  17. ayotte04

    ayotte04 Comrade

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    Spelling spelling spelling. It's the same thing has having them practice on their notebook paper as you read words, but they will pay attention and have more fun if they're using a marker on a board.

    that simple. Plus you can make all sorts of competitive games out of it too.
     
  18. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Oh, I get it! I have been taught the different strategies (the three connections, visualization, etc.), but they were never put together like that! Makes sense! The only difference is that we have two more than your list. Go figure.
     
  19. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Oh, thought of yet another couple of questions:

    How often do you have to wax them, and do you let your students do it?

    Does the wax have to be turtle wax or is another brand just as good? I know in some instances you DON'T want to try a different brand of whatever.
     
  20. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    You only need to wax them once. I don't plan to wax them next year, but I suppose it wouldn't hurt if I did.

    I let my early bird students do it one day last year. They enjoyed doing it, but it totally stank up the room. Is stank a word?

    I got the regular name brand turtle wax because it cost the same as the generic stuff. I've never used the generic stuff, but I doubt it would be all that different. We're not protecting the white boards from bird poop like we do our cars (can you imagine?!), so any kind should work.
     
  21. born2teach84

    born2teach84 Comrade

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    We make chants and raps out of it so the kids know what it means. They love it and it really helps them because it is catchy!! It is a county wide used acronym so when children move schools they know what it stands for and how to use it. We do really neat things with it and build on making meaty questions and things like that.
     
  22. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    According to the illustrious and all-knowing Dr. Seuss it is! Just ask the Grinch!
     
  23. ayotte04

    ayotte04 Comrade

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    i wonder if the word you were looking for was "stunk". hahaha
     
  24. Briana008

    Briana008 Companion

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    Bandnerdtx, I too play the flute in a community band--once a band nerd, always a band nerd! :)

    I'm loving this white board idea. I'm just starting my credential program in secondary science education and none of my teachers ever did anything like this when I was in school. I can't wait to try it in my own classroom!
     
  25. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I think stunk would be used with a helping verb.

    Stink, stank, stunk.
    Like: Sing, sang, sung


    He stinks.
    He sings.

    He stank yesterday.
    He sang yesterday.

    He has stunk previously.
    He has sung previously.
     
  26. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    I went to Staples today and got a whiteboard easel pad. Too bad I don't have an easel. That's another problem. But, there are several sheets of 'white board' and it looks like a regular chart pad. It swears that it erases easily. We'll see. It was $24.99.
     
  27. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Has anyone used one of the Post it re-stickable easel pads?
     
  28. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I have, but only when I haven't had to pay for them with my share of the budget money. They seem very expensive just to be able to move them to a different spot.
     
  29. wldywall

    wldywall Connoisseur

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    I use my whiteboards for reveiw games of many types to include one I called speed essay. I gave the students the essay question and htey had to brainstorm all the info they could that they would use to answer that question. If they came up with something too general or just wrong I would challenge them, if they were challenged they had to write an essay of several sentences to one paragraph on the spot using only the info they brainstormed. If they couldn't do it, no points. The teams that reached a certain level of points got a bonus on their test. It is a great way to get kids to think more in depth on a topic and prepare for the time constraints of state mandated essay responses.
     
  30. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Nice idea, wldywall! What grade do you teach? I seem to have forgotten, lol.
     
  31. wldywall

    wldywall Connoisseur

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    I taught 9th last year and this year I will teach 6, 7th and 8th grade social studies and US history. Works really well for them
     
  32. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    I would think it would for 5th as well. If you have any really cool ideas for US history projects that can be redeveloped to a 5th grade level, I would LOVE to see them! (Hint, Hint, no pressure here, nope, no way!)
     
  33. wldywall

    wldywall Connoisseur

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    How about you see my thread on SS/US history teachers, and look at my activity for recreating the okalahoma land rush, I did it in a college ed class they loved it, did it with 9th graders and they loved it, I am sure that 5th graders will love it. (they have to run and try to steal claims, commmon you know they will love it)

    Before I give you more ideas, what are you required to teach in 5th grade there, it is different in every state, tell me and I will flood you with ideas.....promise. My principal last year said I "have an uncanny talent for coming up with curriculum!"

    :D
     
  34. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Warning: VERY LONG!

    I saw that one! (Didn't remember where, though, lol) I thought it was fabulous! I have also thought of assigning roles as the founders, and have them reenact the drafting of the Declaration of Independence and/or Constitution, including the development of governmental agencies (like the treasury). Probably too involved, huh?

    The largest portion is US history from the indigenous cultures (pre colonization including Mayans, Aztecs, and "Native American") through colonization, the development of and beginnings of the country (i.e., Declaration of Independence, Stamp Act, Revolutionary War, the aftermath, etc.); trade between Europe, Africa, and the US and its ramifications (slavery); the influence and effects of Spanish colonization in Florida, Louisiana, and the Southwest and Mexico
    We have to cover map reading and usage -- Love that one -- my hubby and I were girl & boy scout leaders!
    US Geography and Settlement patterns (land use, etc.)
    Reasons behind colonization and why the colonists settled where they did
    Impacts humans have physically had on US land
    Compare aspects of American colonial government (e.g., local, colonial governors, role of the British parliament and Crown) to present-day U.S. local, state, and national government
    Describe economic activities within and among American Indian cultures prior to contact with Europeans
    Use economic concepts (e.g., supply and demand, scarcity, interdependence) to identify the economic motivations for European exploration and settlement in the Americas
    Construct a timeline of key events in American history (beginnings to 1763)
    Demonstrate an understanding of relative and absolute chronology by interpreting data presented in a timeline
    Identify different points of view about key events in early American history
    Identify the causes, effects, or impact of a given event in early American history
    Use both a primary and secondary source to describe key events or issues in early American history
    Identify historical issues or problems in early America and explain how they were addressed
    Conduct historical research using a variety of resources to answer historical questions related to early American history

    Whew, that's it in a nutshell! Hope I didn't overstay my welcome, lol!
     

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