inclusion

Discussion in 'Special Education Archives' started by Guest, Sep 24, 2002.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Sep 24, 2002

    Hi I am finishing up my graduate degree in special education. I have some experience as a teaching assistant in approved private school, but none ion public. I keep hearing that inclusion is the trend, but teachers are frustrated by the way the system is set up for inclusion. any thoughts
     
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  3. SpecialPreskoo

    SpecialPreskoo Moderator

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    Sep 24, 2002

    Regular Ed teacher usually don't get the support needed in order to serve special ed students properly in their room. Some SPE students can function in a Reg. Ed. room. Other student cannot function in a Reg Ed room. Think about it... which makes more sense... SPE kid in a Reg Ed room with 20+ kids or SPE kid in a SPE room with 10 SPE kids and probably an aide or 2 if they are lucky. There are some cases the SPE child needs to be in the REG society for social purposes... how to behave and act "normal" if anyone really acts normal now-a-days. If they are in a SPE class with students that are immature and the SPE child regresses, then put them in the REG room so they can improve socially. Most of these students will function in the REG society after school so they need to know how to fit in.

    I have a 23 yr old brother with Downs. I would not have wanted him going to my high school. He went to the county's center that had the lower functioning student there. I wasn't too happy with what he learned there but I know he was safer there and was accepted by the other students there. He needed life skills but wasn't taught them... paper work mostly... but that is another soap box.

    I hope that made sense... my 2 cents worth. :)

    Lori
     
  4. erinkate

    erinkate Rookie

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    Sep 25, 2002

    Yes, it does make sense. I have worked with students with severe disabilities (as a teaching assistant), who I really feel benefitted from the specialized supports they recieved. However, i get the sense that people look down on parents for placing thier child in that setting rather than in the regular ed setting.
     
  5. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Sep 25, 2002

    I have taught Sp. Ed. for 27 years and I love self-contained and I hate inclusion because it is typically not done correctly. It should be used as an option on a continium of services from least to more restrictive. It also must be the most appropriate placement and people tend to forget that. My nephew is mentally impaired and 30 + years old. He isn't included in society- accepted but not included. The little people who work in the real world are never invited to happy hour etc(rarely if ever). I have NEVER had a child regress in terms of behavior or academics in my program. High expectations are demanded. Thanks for listening
     
  6. SpecialPreskoo

    SpecialPreskoo Moderator

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    Sep 25, 2002

    I would think people would look down on a parent for putting a severely disabled student in the regular room. I mean if their mental capabilities are severe, then how can they learn in a reg ed class? Now, say a person with severe CP and a bright mind, they don't need to be in a SPE class, but need to be in a reg class with whatever technical equipment it takes to help them make it. If it is a child who's behavior along with their delays causes a problem in the reg class, I would see where other parents would look down on having them in the reg room taking away from their children's learning.

    But that is what an IEP is all about... INDIVIDUALIZED. No 2 kids are alike and the reg ed setting is not for all.

    That's my opinion. :)

    Lori
     
  7. erinkate

    erinkate Rookie

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    Sep 26, 2002

    I agree with all of you. However, what if I am learning in class (and this is class) the system is leaning towards full inclusion. Is that right?????
     
  8. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Sep 26, 2002

    My system is erin........and it is scary......very very scary. Find a teacher with a similiar teaching style as you and it can be tolarable.......but for the kids.....it is wrong .......wrong......wrong!!!!!!!!
     
  9. SpecialPreskoo

    SpecialPreskoo Moderator

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    Sep 26, 2002

    well, if a parent wants a child in a self-contained room or in full inclusion, the parent can demand which ever setting and accomodation must be made. If i knew my child could make it in reg ed inclusion with or without an aide then I'd push for that, but if I knew that they couldnt make it and a self contained class would be more appropriate, then I'd fight tooth and nail to get them in there.

    I know with my position i feel like I am stuck between a rock and a hard place. when my preschooler age out of my room, where do they go? do we try them in a reg class? do we put them in special ed? where to the parents want them? and THEN they ask my opinion... WELL... i hate that. If they try them in Reg. Ed. they end up having to hire an aide and then the child still has problems.

    I think I'm rambling... I'll hush... LOL
    Lori
     
  10. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Oct 3, 2002

    I am a spec ed teacher I teach Autistic children and the push this year is for inclusion I have had the same children for 2years and havw been self contained the entire time with just alittle inclusion! But once the parents get aliitl taste they go crazy and thinkk that being with typical children will help cure their children. They are not in the schools to see what happens I am really being torn apart by this I feel that we did better being self-contained Everything I feel is so politically incorrect HELP1
     
  11. SpecialPreskoo

    SpecialPreskoo Moderator

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    Oct 3, 2002

    Unregisted just above this post...

    What grade are they? I had 2 autistic preschoolers go on to regular K. One started the year off with an aide and the other got on later on. They are full inclusion. The one with the full time aide right off the bat had some melt downs at times but they were told to have her a corner to get away from it all and for time-outs.

    As fas as I know they are both doing great.

    Lori
     
  12. erinkate

    erinkate Rookie

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    Oct 7, 2002

    I agree with all of you. Inclusion is a case by case decision. It is not right for all kids, and we should not force our idea of "regular education" on these kids. That is why they are considered "special" and have IEP's, which are individualized to thier needs. Not all students with the same exceptionality presents the same way, just as not all "regular" students learn the same way. Sometimes, i feel like we are pushing our kids to fit a model, rather than celebrating their indivduality and unique gifts. Why won't the so called experts realize that by psuhing kids into a model, we are actually pushing them farther and farther away from learning and education as a whole :confused:
     
  13. AngelaS

    AngelaS Cohort

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    Oct 7, 2002

    My new school does something that I had never heard of but maybe is commonplace in other parts of the country.

    There are 3 third grades. Three have all general ed kids (although there are a decent amount of 'slip through the cracks' type) and speech lang kids. The other class is inclusion- any third grader with an IEP goes in there, along with some gen ed kids. We have almost 30 in our classes; the inclusion has 19.

    A spec educator comes into the inclusion classroom on a reg basis to team teach.

    I enjoy this set up because meeting IEP goals is subtracted from my ever-growing list of tasks as a teacher. I could not imagine having spec needs students along with 25 gen ed kids (although I have done it before- not fair for anyone involved).

    I do wonder if the instruction in the inlcusion class is too slow for the gen ed kids. I would want my own child in the gen ed class to make sure s/he was being properly challenged (sorry if that sounds un-p.c. There are kids in that class who are reading at K level). :)
     
  14. SpecialPreskoo

    SpecialPreskoo Moderator

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    Oct 7, 2002

    Schools need to be careful about that. I think a principal I used to work with called it "tracking" and grouping all the SPE kids in the same class like that is illegal in some states. It makes a lot of sense to put them all in there, but I don't think they are supposed to do that.

    You might want to look into that. I might be wrong. Anyone else know about this?

    Lori
     
  15. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    Oct 7, 2002

    not sure... but the K class i'm doing clinicals in right now, the 1st day the teacher tells me "I have the inclusion class." (She's also looping K-1) She's got one very high-functioning autistic kid (he has an aide, who seems more of a classroom aide than his 1-on-1) and 2 kids diagnosed LD (I don't know how you diagnose LD in K, but that's another thread...) and several kids who get speech therapy. 20 kids in the class, but that's about the norm for the school.
     
  16. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Oct 22, 2002

    about "individualized" IEPs...my school is so lazy that all the IEPs are so generic and all pretty much say the same. Nothing is listed or stated individually. now they want to include these kids in the reg. ed. room. hmmm...and they wonder why the kids struggle and can't handle it? maybe we need to take the extra time to actually write out the kids needs. just a thought. inclusion is so ridiculous for some kids. no one at my school knows how to do it the right way, because no one tells us. we just make it up as we go along, and hope for the best.
     

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