Inclusion Questions

Discussion in 'Special Education Archives' started by Starting_Over, May 8, 2006.

  1. Starting_Over

    Starting_Over Rookie

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    May 8, 2006

    Hi Everyone,

    I'm thinking of becoming certified in Special Education, so I have been trying to research specific issues and terms so I can become more familiar with the field.

    I have been searching and searching for a clear answer to this question, but I wanted to ask it here:

    What is the difference between Self-Contained and Inclusion. I know that self-contained students stay in the same classroom with the same teacher every day, is that right? What students require this type of attention? Is it mainly for Severely handicapped students or something?

    What I'm really wanting more information about is Inclusion. Could someone explain some basics to me, and/or provide me with some helpful links.

    Thanks so much:)

    P.S. Sorry if this is a stupid question, but I am really unclear about the specifics of each.:sorry:
     
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  3. Lesley

    Lesley Habitué

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    May 8, 2006

    Inclusion is the process of providing all students with the opportunity to participate in the school community regardless of their individual strengths or limitations. Meaning you include the students with disabilities in the regular classroom setting (as much as possible). some are in a regular classroom all day with an aid. self contained is where a teacher has the same children all day-children do not pass for classes, except sometimes for fine arts and P.E.
     
  4. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

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    Lesley answered your question. But I'll add some since I work with inclusion children. I'll give an example of one student's schedule.
    I am with him first thing in the morning when he arrives. At 8:20 I walk him to his classroom. Help him decide what he is going to eat for lunch (hot lunch they have two or three choices). Get him set up for the day. At 8:50 he is pulled out of the classroom for an hr for literacy. I work with this student plus four others at a slower pace than the normal classroom. At 9:50 he goes back to class until 10:30. Than it is recess I go outside to monitor his behavior. 10:45 he is back with his classroom until lunch time. At which point I attend lunch with him and recess (12:30 to 1:10). I again bring him back to class. At 1:30 he is pulled for math. He stays for a half hr than goes back to class. At 2:20 I go to the classroom for end of the day dismissals and stay with him until he gets on his bus.
    I personally think the ideal inclusion for this student would be in the classroom all day long with a one on one.
     
  5. Starting_Over

    Starting_Over Rookie

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    Thank you so much for all of the information, it was really helpful. I have one more question. Is it up to the teacher whether they want to be a self-contained teacher or inclusion, or does the school decide?:thanks:
     
  6. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

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    I would say it's up to the school.. most schools are phasing out self-contained.. at least around here it seems
     
  7. Starting_Over

    Starting_Over Rookie

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    So are you only responsible for this student, or do you have several students with different schedules?
     
  8. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

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    It seems like the kid is out more than he's in the room.. I agree w/ you Jamie that a better idea would be in all day w/ a one on one.
     
  9. tmig71582

    tmig71582 New Member

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    Inclusion Pre-K

    I teach Inclusion Pre-K and basically the IEP committee (parents, teachers, therapists, student if old enough, school representative, general education teacher, special education teacher, and sometimes more) decide what setting the student would be most successful in. The student must be placed in his least restrictive environment and be able to make adequate progress. Inclusion just means special education and general education students being educated in the same classroom. The specific amount of time a special ed student may spend in this classroom may vary based on Speech, Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, or even more intensive special education assistance.
    Personally this year I help students that become overwhelmed, have break downs, self-help difficulties, and to reinforce what their speech teacher, OT, and PT are working on. I pull groups of students who need help on specific skills, take data based on their IEP goals, implement creative strategies to increase success, and more.
    I love how there are so many adults to brainstorm creative strategies and even basic academic skills.
    The school will decide based on the children and the school setting which setting they are going to offer. However, if you are in a school and you believe your students would benefit from the other program and can defend why then the principal will probably work with you on altering the program. Nationally inclusion should become more prevalant than self contained...eventually.
     
  10. Starting_Over

    Starting_Over Rookie

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    May 9, 2006

    Oh, I see. So it's up to the school. I just wasn't sure if there was a specific concentration of Special Education (i.e. Moderate/Severely Handicapped, etc.) that would result in a Self-contained classroom, or if different students required different things. Now I'm starting to get a more clear picture.

    Thank you all for the information :)
     
  11. jhamm57

    jhamm57 Rookie

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    I am a special education teacher. The placement starts with the initial evaluation for the child. Based on the child's exceptionality, a placement is usually recommended. The more involved the child's problems, that is behavior or health issues, the more time is usually designated in the special education classroom.The IEP team meets and discusses their options, and ultimately the parent signs the IEP and gives permission for the program to be implemented. The IEP stands for Individualized Education Plan. It is different for each individual child, because each child has his/her own individual strengths and/or weaknesses.
     
  12. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

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    Starting_Over: I work with four students total.
    MissFrizzle he is with his classmates for 4. 5 hrs and out of the class for 1.5 hrs a day.
     
  13. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

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    That's reasonable then.. it just sounded like he was out more
     
  14. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

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    He is only out more if he is naughty in the classroom. But lately he has been very good. (Knocking on wood ):)
    I think he needs to be in his class for math I think he can handle be in there.
     
  15. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

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    Sorry, I just jumped in w/out really reading all the posts... but do you use team teaching in an inclusion classroom?
     
  16. Irissa

    Irissa Cohort

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    Miss Frizzle- Yes. You would co-teach in an inclusion setting. (At least that is the hope) My ESE counterpart is in my room for 2 days a week 2-3 hours a day and during that time we co-teach lessons. I am really thrilled because this coming year although i'm loosing my current co-teacher that I adore, I will be team teaching/co-teaching with 2 other teachers. Myself and one other regular ed teacher and a new ESE teacher who will be with us all day! YAH! Grant you we will have 30 kids in our room but the ratio is less than this year. This year I have 16 kids 8 reg and 8 ese.
     
  17. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

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    What does ESE stand for?
     
  18. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Esceptional student education.

    What county, Irissa?
     
  19. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

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    Thanks Daisy.
     
  20. Irissa

    Irissa Cohort

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    Clay
     
  21. jenglish97

    jenglish97 Devotee

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    I teach in a second grade inclusion class. I have been an inclusion teacher for the last four years and love it. In my inclusion classroom, the regular education and special education teacher share all responsibilities. We usually plan all the lessons together. The regular education teacher write the plans and I usually do the modifications to the lessons.

    As for IEP's, we write them up together and do the goals and objectives every marking period. As for the class, all the students can come any one of us with questions or help. Actually, I work with some regular education students and teach them to be peer mentors to the special education students. They work out great. I have to say that this is definitely the place for me. If you have any other specific questions, you PM me.

    Hope this is helpful.
     
  22. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

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    jenglish- I am hoping for second grade and wouldn't mind inclusion. I'm glad you enjoy your class so much. That sounds promising. I have no experience writing IEP's so that makes me a little nervous.... how difficult is it?
     
  23. jenglish97

    jenglish97 Devotee

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    IEP's can be tricky at times but when I started to write them I went to the learning consultant and asked if she can get me examples of how they wanted us to write up IEP's from the Director of Special Services. Usually the CST (child study team) will help you write them up or at least give you ideas on how to write them and what they expect in an IEP. In fact, my district is using a computer program for create IEP's which is pretty simple to use.
     
  24. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

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    that's a relief..
     
  25. NewsWatcher1978

    NewsWatcher1978 New Member

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    jenglish, do you teach both the "typical" students and the students with special needs in your inclusion class? I'm working on my degree in mild/mod spec. ed. so I've been wondering for a while if I'd be able to teach reg. ed. too.
     
  26. halpey1

    halpey1 Groupie

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    Jenglish97l, I have tried to PM you, but it won't let me... in any event, I would love to email with you as I have just been hired as a regular ed teacher to co-teach with a Special Ed teacher in a 2nd grade room... I'm a little nervous as my student teaching experience was in an inclusion room where the special ed kids were pulled out for literacy and math... my new job, is co-teaching and the kids are not pulled out and I have some questions as to what literacy and math look like... would you mind emailing me at halpey1@yahoo.com to discuss? I really appreciate it!
     
  27. jenglish97

    jenglish97 Devotee

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    NewsWatcher1978-

    I do teach to both groups of children in the classroom. There are many ways you can teach in the classroom with another teacher.

    Here are some ways to teach in an inclusion class:
    1. parallel teaching - split the class up and teach the same lesson in smaller groups

    2. Support teaching - one teacher teaches and the other supports the lesson by walking around, and making sure the children are with the teacher. Another way, one teacher teaches and the other writes the answers on the board (color-coded).

    3. Co-teaching - Both teachers teach together. We basically finish each other sentences and interject when we feel is right. The children love it because they get two points of view and have to be paying attention to the both of us. It is actually nice because I am a very visual person and need to have everything written down and the other teacher is an auditory person and makes sure everyone hears what we have to say. The children get to benefit from both teachers.

    Another thing I do in my classroom is when we teach the whole lesson and I feel that my special education children are having a difficult time with a specific concept then I pull them into a small group and reintroduce the lesson and maybe work on the independent work together as a group. I actually teach a couple of typical students to work with my special education children when they are finished with their work. All the children like to help each other out.
     

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