Inclusion in Pre-k daycare setting

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by Grammy Teacher, Jun 8, 2013.

  1. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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    I've taught Pre-K in a private childcare for over 20 years. I have had many special needs children in my class and have worked hard to accommodate their needs.
    I have a question about a child who has epilepsy, is non-verbal, needs to be fed and diapered, has seizures, falls frequently, and needs to be carried up stairs because of his disabilities, etc. How would you accommodate this child into a "regular" classroom of 4/5 year olds?
    I really am at a loss and would appreciate details, such as room set up, aides, toys, activities, etc. Thank you.
     
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  3. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Jun 8, 2013

    Will he have an aide (either a paraprofessional or a healthcare aide)?
     
  4. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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    No. 13 children in class.
     
  5. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

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    I've worked in private daycare centers before. At most of the ones that I've worked at, it wouldn't be allowed, simply because of licensing. I don't remember how it was worded, but all children had to be completely potty trained. Facilities were not provided to change diapers.

    As for making modifications,how does this child communicate? Do you need picture boards for him to communicate? Where & how are you going to feed & diaper him. Since he falls frequently do you have any sharp corners to worry about? What is the plan when he has a seizure? What are the cognitive abilities beyond being non-verbal?

    Just some questions to ask/think about.
     
  6. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    I have no idea how you would do it without a full time aide for the child. I would be asking the director for training/PD on inclusion.
     
  7. Preschool0929

    Preschool0929 Cohort

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    Jun 8, 2013

    Resources

    This child should have an IEP and receive additional support services (OT, PT, SLP, etc...) Your first consideration would be to look at the IEP goals and figure out how to incorporate these goals into your daily plans. You should consult with the parents and the speech therapist about the communication system they are currently using (PECS, sign language). You might also need to request from the family or therapists some classroom adaptive seating for large group and at the tables, as well as adaptive switch toys. An OT will be able to help you encourage adaptive and self help skills, as well as provide some modified utensils so that he can learn to eat on his own. All staff working in your classroom should be trained on seizure protocol. You might want to also consider how you will introduce the other children to him and be sure to promote appropriate interactions and understanding.
     
  8. Grammy Teacher

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    I will try and clarify what I know about him. He has been in our care for about 2 years and is currently in the 3 year old classroom. We are "all" familiar with his care for seizures and medications. He cannot eat by himself at all using utensils, but can grab at his food with his hands and somewhat feed himself. He is not capable of sign language or toilet training. He wears a helmet now because he falls constantly and many times falling into sharp corners indoors. There is no communication or ways to know what he wants unless he is crying and then we figure out if he needs sleep or food. The children are used to him and are good to him. He doesn't "play" with them or with any toys. He basically sits and chews on his special rubber type toys or looks out the windows, which results in falling down off the bench by the windows. He falls asleep often sitting up while we are outside and has to be carried up a high flight of stairs to the classroom to be laid down or to see if he wants to eat.
    During the school year, he is gone all morning for special services provided through the school. There are no services available for the summer months, so he is brought to us.
    The parents said that they are given a small amount of money for his care, so they use that money to hire an aide in the summer. During the school year, when he is with us, there is no one to provide us with an aide.
    The parents told us they have no where else to take him and that their hope is that through socialization in daycare with "normal" children, he will improve.
    In the years that he has been in our care, there has been no change in his abilities, even though he has experienced services provided through the school and a team of doctors. I hope this gives you a better picture.
     
  9. Preschool0929

    Preschool0929 Cohort

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    Hmm...

    Well it seems that if he has been receiving services through the school, they would already have adaptations and modifications in place that are working for him there. Can you request a copy of the IEP so that you are aware of everything they are already using with him? It seems that a picture system would be used to help him communicate. I have students with severe disabilities that we use a very simple pec system with. I would also strongly suggest adaptive and switch operated toys. You can request copy of his last evaluation to see where he is developmentally and begin working on simple concepts such as demonstrating cause and effect, engaging in sensory play, and interacting with toys appropriately. Use a system of most to least prompts and begin with simple toys like chunky puzzles, peg boards, and pop beads. Start with hand over hand, then reduce physical prompting as he becomes more able. When school begins, contact his teacher for help so that you can carry over the strategies they use. You can also use a variety of sensory experiences to encourage communication and socialization.
     
  10. Grammy Teacher

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    I'm sure I can get copies of the IEP. I'm not sure how well his eyesight is. He wears thick lenses and doesn't seem to focus on any objects ever. He loves to play in the water table or sink.
    Do you think one teacher can handle him along with the rest of the class? That's my biggest issue. No one seems to have any money for an aide. What do you think I could do?
     
  11. Preschool0929

    Preschool0929 Cohort

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    His IEP should tell you if there is a vision problem or something like cortical impairment. With 13 children in your class, it's going to be difficult, but definitely doable. Your 4-5 year olds might need to do more independent centers/stations and small group time might have to be cut short sometimes. In my classroom, I have mostly students with special needs, from cerebral palsy to autism, and then some typical students. Usually what I do is start with morning circle, and the older students help get the adaptive seating out and ready. I typically sit in the floor with the most severe students right next to me so I can make sure they are safe. It's useful to have some fidget toys ready for this time so that he can stay occupied. When we go to centers, I dismiss my students and then set my special students up with an activity at the floor or the table. If it's something like water play, I put water in a small bin at the table, and that's the table I sit at to do my small group lesson with the others. For me, the biggest strategy is proximity. You want to make sure he is participating and interacting with peers and materials. I also pair my higher level students up with a lower functioning student and we do small group activities to learn how to interact with each other and promote social skills.

    With all this said, your center should be ready and willing to provide at least a floater person that can come in every now and then to see if you need help, assist with diapering, and help during meal time. Transitions will probably be the most difficult time to be by yourself.
     
  12. Grammy Teacher

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    Jun 8, 2013

    Those are wonderful suggestions.Thank you very much.
     

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