Inclusion Class Question

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Loveslabs, Jun 2, 2014.

  1. Loveslabs

    Loveslabs Companion

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    I will be teaching a second grade inclusion class next year. 14 of the 29 students are special education students. They are labeled CD, LD, ED, and OHI. Many of them also receive OT, PT, Speech, social skills, adaptive gym, and counseling. I will have 4 others that qualify for speech.

    Personally, I think this whole inclusion thing is getting out of control. I think this is far too many special needs kids in a regular classroom. I have several families requesting other teachers because they feel the numbers are too high for inclusion. This upsets me because many of these families have been part of my teaching career for the last 10-20 years. I have even had some of the children of my former students.

    Please share your grade, how many inclusion students you have, and whether you have a paraprofessional. I am curious how this is handled in other systems.
     
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  3. BumbleB

    BumbleB Habitué

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    I see around 20 SPED students throughout the day in inclusion. I co-teach language arts, and my kids are spread out through three classes. No paraprofessional. 8th grade.
     
  4. mathteachertobe

    mathteachertobe Cohort

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    So you are teaching an inclusion class but not receiving any additional support? Those numbers seem really high for second grade. I teach eighth and one of my sections of 32 had similar numbers, with quite a few ELs, but it was a co-taught class.
     
  5. Loveslabs

    Loveslabs Companion

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    I forgot to mention the special education teacher will push in or pull out for about an hour each day. She is notorious for not showing up or coming in half an hour late. In other words, she is worthless. A couple of years ago I was stuck working with her. She couldn't handle pulling 7 kids even when my paraprofessional went with her to help. How is she going to deal with 14?
    I will have a paraprofessional, but she will be completely tied up with the one ED student that has severe issues.
     
  6. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    Wow, that sounds like a nightmare. I'd be so upset if I was the teacher or the parent of a child in that class :(
     
  7. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    That's ridiculous on every level. I'd refuse that assignment as a teacher, and I'd be going directly up the administrative ladder to get my kid the hell out of that class as a parent.
     
  8. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    At my school we have had "inclusion" classes. Which means the children that need extra services are placed together in a room with children that need extra help but can't get a diagnosis (often because their IQs match their achievement levels) and 3 or 4 "average" students. Meets the letter of the law, but not the spirit.
     
  9. OhThePlaces

    OhThePlaces Cohort

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    That's insane! I teach two classes a day (3rd grade language arts) and my homeroom is inclusion. I have 16 students and 8 of them have IEPs. I have a VE teacher who pushes in for an hour most days.
     
  10. Reality Check

    Reality Check Habitué

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    I usually have 1-2 classes per semester (out of four classes per semester) where the inclusion rate runs about 40%. The grades vary from tenth to twelfth.

    Sometimes I have a paraprofessional, sometimes I don't. Sometimes I have to share one on an every-other-day basis with another teacher.


    :huh:
     
  11. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    One suggestion... know your children's IEPs extremely well, and document the hell out of occasions when they are not being followed. Give the special education teacher every professional courtesy and presume best intentions ("I know you're doing the best you can, but my kids are supposed to get five hours a week, and right now they are only getting 2.5 hours a week, when will your schedule let you be in for the full time?"), but be prepared to go to administration.
     
  12. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    What the-?!!

    I currently have 21 second-graders, and 5 of them are in special ed. I've had a tough year as far as the schedule is concerned. I can never keep it straight, and it changes weekly. I can't even imagine numbers as high as yours. That sounds just horrible. :(

    I would suggest keeping a Google doc of your pull-out and push-in schedule, because it will probably change weekly. We use Google a lot in my district, so my schedule is shared with the secretaries, SPED teacher, speech teacher, and OT. I also have a folder where I share my lesson plans. It was becoming a lot of work to make sure I told everyone when our schedule was changing, due to assemblies, guest speakers, etc. I asked them to just check my lesson plans weekly, so the schedule piece is on them.

    I would also keep a sign-out sheet on a clipboard by your door. Every time another teacher pulls students, have him/her sign them out. This will help if you ever have fire drills, or any other emergency.
     
  13. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    I was the sped co teacher in an English class for the last 3 years. It was a small school, but we had about 5 sped kids in a class of around 20. This was pretty average makeup in all our inclusion classes.
     
  14. Jerseygirlteach

    Jerseygirlteach Groupie

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    Ridiculous, sad, and very unfair to all your students (and you). But hey, it saves money and puts students in LRE so it must be good, right? :rolleyes:
     
  15. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    That's crazy. I'd say 50% of the class being in sped is probably too high for any grade, but no question it's too high for second! I'll have four out of 16 on IEPs next year, along with a few others who really need one but haven't qualified. I felt like I got the high number in the grade-level simply because of my background in sped.... I can't even imagine finding out I had numbers like yours! 29 not on IEPs sounds like a lot in and of itself. Having half of those students on IEPs is truly irresponsible on the part if the school - regardless of co-teachers or paras.
     
  16. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    REALLY like this idea - from the perspective of a classroom AND sped teacher! Might have to try this one next year....
     

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