Inappropriate Things to Say...

Discussion in 'Debate & Marathon Threads Archive' started by armoving, Sep 2, 2007.

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  1. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    Well said, Miss Frizzle. I completely agree!
     
  2. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

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    :2cents: Sarcasm kind of irks me. Yes I use it with my friends, but I remember (vividly) it being used in the classroom when I was in school. Just because your tone of voice is light, or you are smiling, doesn't mean it won't affect the students. The students may even understand your sarcasm, but they could perceive it differently than you intend.

    As for some of the other subjects that the OP posted, I think it depends on your school and area. During part of our health unit we talk about smoking and how it's bad for your body. We also stress that the campus is tobacco free. Bullying is another thing that is not allowed on our school campus. It's actually a state law that says schools will have a "No Tolerance" for bullying.
     
  3. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    I did it with second graders last year. They liked it, and if they started talking, I would say "oops, someone's bubble has popped. please put another one in." :haha:
     
  4. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    I use the 'bubble'- the kids get it.

    Sarcasm- one of our candidates for a teaching position was sarcastic with kids during a demo lesson- she didn't get the job. :eek:hmy:
     
  5. jazzminjoy

    jazzminjoy Comrade

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    Sep 3, 2007

    Shut-up! (No, not you. The phrase--it's a big no-no.)
     
  6. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    The words/phrases "Shut up, stupid, SHHHHHH, jerk, moron..." ANYTHING in that category is NEVER allowed out of my students' mouths, and they KNOW it. I never come close to speaking to them that way, either...
     
  7. Bored of Ed

    Bored of Ed Enthusiast

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    Just a word on sarcasm... don't.

    I managed to float along in general ed to this day, and I still have a hard time with it. Of course, by now I get when people are joking but it takes an extra second and doesn't feel right. Just say what you mean.

    Of course, humor is always in order. But please make sure it is tasteful and leave as little room as possible for misunderstanding.

    If you do tend towards that style, stick to the "cut you up in little pieces" model so it's fairly obvious that you aren't serious. And don't keep a straight face afterward -- it can leave kids wondering.
     
  8. Bored of Ed

    Bored of Ed Enthusiast

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    Oh, by the way -- back to the original post, which mentioned bringing up topics such as smoking which may be viewed differently at home.

    I think there is absolutely nothing wrong and everything right with educating your students about the dangers of smoking. If the parents choose to engage in activities that are known to be harmful to themselves and others, let them answer to their children. It's the least we can do for the kids. They won't be able to complain against you for that; who would take it? It's very basic safety education.
     
  9. Elm512

    Elm512 Companion

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    Sep 4, 2007

    I am still reeling that anyone could think saying "pissed off" or "screwing around" in front of a classroom of kids would be ok!? If my little guy came home and told me the teacher said that, I would be LIVID!
     
  10. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    Sep 4, 2007

    I am the same way and I would care to disagree some people are just sarcastic I also have been like that. Personally, I have said pissed off and screwed around in class before.
     
  11. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    With my own kids (even in Elementary school) I never cared if the teacher was sarcastic rather that they were an effective teacher.
     
  12. 3Sons

    3Sons Enthusiast

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    Personally, words like "screwing around" wouldn't bother me as a parent, though I do know some parents who are really whacko about what words they try to keep from their kids. Unfortunately, since you're teaching a group and you have to be role models, you need to limit yourself to the most sensitive.

    I'd be shocked if a teacher lost their job for anything like this, though. In the district where my son goes to school, apparently one teacher told a student her mother's English "sucked" (they'd done a parent-student presentation the day before), and on another occasion told the class she only likes girls. Both of those would be far worse offenses, I would think, than letting an inadvertent "****" of whatever variety slip out. But the teacher still teaches, and she's not the worst offender in the district, either. The main problem with offensive or semi-offensive words isn't really exposure, it's more modeling. It presents a bad image.

    Sarcasm is okay, but I'd suggest being clear with students that sometimes you are being sarcastic. As a young elementary student, I know I would be inclined to take the teacher at face value in most cases (though I think even I wouldn't have believed being chopped up as a penalty).

    Incidentally, I taught for the Princeton Review for a while after college. Some of the older teachers were specifically told to swear to differentiate themselves from public high school teachers -- and it worked, which suggests in some environments might have different levels of acceptability (I'm trying to imagine inner-city districts and whether "screw around" would really be offensive or not).
     
  13. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    I can't believe this!

    I'd be shocked if a teacher lost their job for anything like this, though. In the district where my son goes to school, apparently one teacher told a student her mother's English "sucked" (they'd done a parent-student presentation the day before), and on another occasion told the class she only likes girls. Both of those would be far worse offenses, I would think, than letting an inadvertent "****" of whatever variety slip out. But the teacher still teaches, and she's not the worst offender in the district, either. The main problem with offensive or semi-offensive words isn't really exposure, it's more modeling. It presents a bad image.

    How can teachers like this be allowed to continue to teach?!? The teacher might be a great teacher, but shows no kind of professionalism. Parents can keep you at a school, or they can have you fired. There are great teachers out there that do not have a job that would never think of saying such things to their students, and teachers such as this are allowed to continue their lack of professionalism. :2cents:
     
  14. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

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    Sep 4, 2007

    Profantity should not be allowed period, even if their parents allow it. It has no place in school, and as teachers we need to set a good role model for all students.
     
  15. Pencil Monkey

    Pencil Monkey Devotee

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    Sep 4, 2007

    words i do not allow in my room:
    stupid
    Dumb
    sucks
    crap
    fat
    ugly
    any profanity
    any OMG, or JC, or G!


    I often use the term "bellyacher" for kids who complain about me making them work. I also use words like disappointed, dissatisfied, unhappy, etc to reflect that I am unhappy about behavior. But for the most part I use the positive by saying "Johny, I know you can do better than that, can you show me?" Other words I use are bonkers, silly, and excited.
     
  16. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

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    Sep 4, 2007



    Whether or not the child finds it offensive or not, is really only part of the issue. We are the adults, we KNOW the difference and negative connotation attached. Now I know some people feel slang is appropriate because we have to relate to the kids we teach, but there should be limits.
     
  17. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Good point, MissFrizzle. I know that my grade 8 boys last year would not have been offended if I had used profanity; they would have thought it was really "cool"--"MrsC, I'd love to hear you swear, just once". They never did and never will (and neither will my children at home) even though they hear worse than anything I would say every day. I feel that I need to set an example and show that profanity, or replacements thereof, need not to used to make a point.
     
  18. jayt11

    jayt11 Rookie

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    Sep 5, 2007

    funny how this thread has turned from an "oh yeah, i said this or that 2 or 3 times" into a social commentary and finger wagging soapbox.

    I think the point of this thread was to admit that none of us are perfect. However, do any of us HIT or abuse our students in a physical way? No.

    Priests do much worse, yet every other teacher I meet wants to recruit collegues to go to church with them. Heck, since this thread is officially a social commentary, the president has done/said a LOT worse, yet people here still voted for him.

    Get back to me when i cause the downfall of humanity.
     
  19. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    WHAT? :confused: The original post asked about what was appropriate language and topics for school. Words can be damaging to kids- hitting a child hurts for the moment, the words we use can hurt for a lifetime...No one is finger wagging here, just sharing our own answers to the original question. I really don't understand why you had to bring in how we don't physically abuse kids, or how 'priests do much worse' or commentary on the president? How does any of this excuse inappropriate language or conversation by teachers? You may not be causing the downfall of humanity, but you may indeed be damaging a child with the words you say- :2cents:
     
  20. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    :confused: Ummm, okay....???
     
  21. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    1. I would be shocked to hear a teacher say pissing.

    2. I also do not allow: Oh my God, God!, Jesus Christ!, etc. I know that is a personal belief, but it just kills me to hear that. I don't make a huge deal out of it when I hear it; I just say, "Oh, no, please don't say that" is a soft but "concerned" voiced.

    3. I can't imagine being told not to be sarcastic. I'm not a mean sarcastic at all...I would feel completely comfortable being "my kind of sarcastic" in front on administration, and the students enjoy it.
     
  22. shouldbeasleep

    shouldbeasleep Enthusiast

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    I don't think anyone can make a judgement call on "sarcasm" in a forum that has teachers from all communities, areas of the country, grade levels, etc. I would personally have to be in the classroom and observe the degree, manner, and reception of sarcastic remarks. There are just too many broad and personal definitions on what is sarcastic, what is wit, and what is just down right mean-spirited.
    I agree with the person who said this is a lot of "finger wagging" when there is no finite clear definition that is commonly accepted. When I say that I don't see anything wrong when I use sarcasm with my fifth graders, my use of it may be not at all what you're thinking it is.

    Example: "Jared. If you don't turn your work in to the basket, I'm going to have to crawl inside your desk and hunt for it, and frankly I don't think I'll fit in there." Is that sarcastic? Wouldn't you have to see my facial expression, see the kid's reaction, know the history of not turning in work, know the class dynamics, etc. before you could make a judgement call on whether my use of sarcasm is bad?
     
  23. cmw

    cmw Groupie

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    :clap: Love that! Using humor to redirect a student or make a point not only softens how you come across, it helps how they respond back to you. It also may stick in their memory or a friends too. The next time another student forgets to turn in a paper someone would probably joke that "uh oh, Mrs. XXXX are you going to crawl in his desk?" :D
     
  24. shouldbeasleep

    shouldbeasleep Enthusiast

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    He thought it was funny, too. And he still doesn't turn in his work. Oh well, at least I know where it is.
     
  25. Katekat

    Katekat Rookie

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    I'm not a teacher yet but I work as a YMCA after school site director and I believe that any rules I expect my kids to follow I myself should follow. If one of my kids told me to shut up or used stronger language when speaking to me I would have a talk with their mom or dad that night. How would it be right for me to speak to them that way when I'm teaching them it's unacceptable to use that kind of language with a teacher? I would much rather have the kids respect me than fear me. I can get my point across with a stern look and voice and have never had to resort to name calling, humiliation or outright yelling.
    As far as sarcasm I think when most people hear sarcasm they think of the negative kind. I think as long as it's done in a positive joking matter it's fine. For example if I change my hair color I'm usually asked at least 10 times by the kids if I dyed my hair and my usual response is "Nope. I just woke up this morning and it was like this." Now if I said it with a nasty look on my face as if I was implying that they were stupid to ask it would be inappropriate but I say it as if I'm surprised that my hair changed colors ("isn't that strange, has it ever happened to you?" type thing) and the kids usually laugh either because Ms. Katie is a dork or because they think it's funny and then run off and try and convince their friends that Ms. Katie's hair magically changed over night.
     
  26. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2007

    Jokes are not sarcasm - even when they are over the top. Maybe especially then. I asked a child if there was a teacher inside his desk who was teaching him because that's where he was looking.
     
  27. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    That's certainly not sarcastic; that's hilarious, and I need to use that one tomorrow!! :toofunny:
     
  28. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    When I'm in public, I get worried if I am in Wal-Mart and slip or something like that- and not even a major word comes out, but someone could be around who I know.

    As for the "my kind of sarcastic"- my administration likes it because it's humor/wit and I love to be funny with my students. :blush: I'll admit it... I love to watch them laugh because it helps them to relax.
     
  29. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    Today, I heard the lovely- "He said the d word."

    I looked at student #1 (who told me this)- "I'm sorry, this does not affect you, and if I ever hear the word myself, I will speak to that person. You don't need to tell me that someone said an inappropriate word. It has nothing to do with you." (I then turned to student #2, who apparently said it)- "If by chance you said that word, you know that there are better words to say to express yourself. I am a teacher, an adult, and I don't even say those words."

    Cursing from anyone upsets me, though the students did learn today that I am not a monitor or cop. If I ever hear it- which I seldom do- I speak quietly to the student who said it. In some lives, it's 100% normal, but I wouldn't even venture into the realm of saying anything like that or would even PARALLEL that...

    Those are my two cents. :2cents: :whistle:
     
  30. shouldbeasleep

    shouldbeasleep Enthusiast

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    I like this one! I think I'll tell him that I put a miniature shredder in there so he'll never be able to get it back. No, forget it, he probably would think that the problem would then be taken care of. And then there would be a ruckus because the other kids would start saying that they wanted one. It could lead to inappropriate words on my part. :lol:He really is such an adorable boy with a huge grin. Just very absent-minded.

    I do agree with some of the posters about what I think are rude words. I just tell them that since I am the Queen of the Universe, it's my rules this year and certain words are off limits.
     
  31. bonneb

    bonneb Fanatic

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    There seems to be 2 issues going here
    1) the use of sarcasm in the classroom
    2) teachers using profanity or dirty language, or euphemisms, or swearing at/in front of the students

    It is hard to define sarcasm on this board, because sarcasm has a tone and lots of shades of humor. Setting that aside, I have to say that the actual words we use need to be of a high caliber. We are educators! Can we not think of expressive, creative words to use that are not the common gutter talk of today? We are in the spotlight and have a lot of influence on how children go out into the world. Why not set a high standard, the very highest, so anyone who comes across our words will be bettered by what we have to say?


    jayt11 - Your argument doesn't hold up. Lots of people have done and said lots of things that are worse than what other people have done and said. Is the standard at the lowest common denominator? To be blunt, your reasoning sounds like what we hear from our students. "Why am I in trouble when he did something worse?" Instead of looking to blame or point your own finger at others, why not look for the highest standards of speech and start there? Please don't take this as an attack because it is not meant as one - I would just like you to detach from your emotions and think in an objective way. Should our standard be the speech of an R rated movie, or the speech of Mother Theresa? Which one carries the greater respect and which one communicates best?
     
  32. MissV

    MissV Companion

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    Sep 8, 2007

    crap

    ugh. I said crap yesterday in my classroom, and one of my kids said, "gasp! that's a bad word"

    Did not even *occur* to me that I had used it, or that I had said something inappropriate.

    What an eye opener. It made my stomach hurt the rest of the day, I was so embarrassed!
     
  33. bonneb

    bonneb Fanatic

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    Sometimes we slip up! Just admit your mistake. I would say, "Thank you Johnny, you are right and I apologize. I'll do better." I think kids appreciate seeing us make mistakes and set them right.

    Also, something that hasn't been mentioned here, we need to give our kids the appropriate words to say. Like, "Oh fiddlesticks." or actually stating feelings "I am losing my patience" "I am starting to feel upset." etc. What exactly is pissed off?????? It is not an accurate description of anything. Sometimes they use bad language because they haven't been taught an alternative.

    Sorry, when I hear the wor *crap* I immediately picture something large, squishy, and stinky. Yuck.
     
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