In need of some encouragement

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by HistoryGuy89, Aug 1, 2011.

  1. HistoryGuy89

    HistoryGuy89 Rookie

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    Aug 1, 2011

    A friend recommended this site to me, so I'd figure I'd give it a shot. I graduated this May with a degree in 7-12 Social Studies, and a 2nd major in History. Since March,I have done about 35 applications to schools in 5 states, and haven't even gotten one interview. I'm honestly devastated, and have no idea what I'm doing wrong. I know the NE Ohio market isn't the easiest, but having done so many applications, and not even getting looked at, it really hurts :(
     
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  3. jenglish97

    jenglish97 Devotee

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    Aug 1, 2011

    Keep your head up high!

    For my first teaching job, I was hired the Friday before Labor Day. We usually go back to work on the Tuesday after Labor Day. I only had one day to set-up and get the ball rolling before the children started the next day.

    I would put your name on the sub list for a few of the districts. That is one way to get your foot in the door.

    Good luck! Sending you some vibes and hope of encouragement.
     
  4. labar

    labar Rookie

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    I'm just throwing a BS statistic your way here (thought I'm sure it is not far from the truth), but probably 80%(-ish) of education majors that graduated this past May are in the same boat as you. This has been a trend for the last 2 years or more. That means those 80%(-ish) of people from the last 2 years of not finding a job; probably 50% of them have been looking and applying for teaching jobs this summer as well.

    My best advice to you is to get yourself into the surrounding school systems as a sub. Keep looking daily for anything new to post on school websites (there will be people to leave for another job/district at the last minute), and just start preparing to be available to substitute when school starts back.

    It took me two and a half years of dedication before I finally got my job this summer (granted my first year post graduation I moved to a state I wasn't licensed to teach in yet).
     
  5. HistoryGuy89

    HistoryGuy89 Rookie

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    Thanks for the kind words. I'll be signed up to sub in about 4 counties assuming all goes well, so subbing should come.
     
  6. labar

    labar Rookie

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    If you don't mind me asking...did you do applications only? Did you send principals a cover letter and resume for specific positions?
     
  7. Joy

    Joy Cohort

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    Aug 1, 2011

    I graduated in 2009 with K-12 Music Ed. Where I live, those jobs have really been cut back and I've been competing against alot of teachers with several years of experience that lost their jobs because of budget cuts. For the past two years, I have been subbing and it looks like I will be doing the same this year. Subbing will help you get your foot in the door and give you some experience. Last year I subbed 161 days so it can be pretty well full-time if you want it to be.

    Here are some tips on getting more days as a sub:

    1. Leave very detailed notes on your own letterhead. You can make your own for really cheap. Make sure that you have your name, your phone number, and your sub number (if your school has it) on the top. Also make sure that you leave a business card with your note to the teacher.

    2. Try to eat your lunch in the teacher's lounge and be very friendly. Use it as your networking time (don't be fake, just be friendly).

    3. Try to make sure that the room that you sub in is as neat or neater than when you got there in the morning.

    4. Make sure that the kids know your expectations from the beginning of the day and don't be afraid to take away privileges. You can be nice but you also have to be firm. Alot of kids like to test the sub.

    5. Always have something extra in your sub bag. You never know when you might need a time filler.

    6. This year I am sending out postcards to the teachers in my content area. That way they know in advance that I am qualified to teach music. You can get them for pretty cheap at vistaprint!

    7. If you have a bad day, put it behind you. The good thing about subbing is that if one class is really bad, you don't have to go back!

    8. Enjoy getting to see what you never would have been able to if you had a permanent teaching job. I have taught a little bit of everything and I have learned far more than if I had gotten a music job right away. Everyday as a substitute teacher is an adventure!
     
  8. HistoryGuy89

    HistoryGuy89 Rookie

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    Aug 1, 2011

     
  9. Lmb5713

    Lmb5713 Rookie

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    I am in the same boat as you, and I'm also social studies. Out of all of those applications, I JUST had my first interview on Thursday. Now I'm crossing my fingers and playing the waiting game.
    A few weeks ago, per the advice of people on this site, I e-mailed my resume and cover letter to every P in my district. That was a HUGE help in landing my interview, and something to consider.
    It's really hard, but try to keep positive. Something will come, eventually.
     
  10. SCTeachInTX

    SCTeachInTX Fanatic

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    Aug 2, 2011

    I think part of the problem may be your major. The market is inundated with SS majors right now. Applicants that are adding to their certifications are landing jobs. I would definitely think about doing that. Also, if you get your ESL certification or offer to coach a sport, you are more marketable. Think about adding to your certificate if possible. It is relatively easy (though not cheap) in Texas. I know different states require different things.
    :)
    Good luck! Things will turn up. Just keep your eyes and ears open for possible openings. Email every school within a 30 to 45 minute drive of your home with your resume and cover letter. Get your name OUT THERE! Personalize the email. Check out the school's website and write things that noticed from studying the website and how you might "fit" with that school and their philosophy. Make yourself stand out!;)
     
  11. labar

    labar Rookie

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    Aug 2, 2011

     
  12. TeachingHistory

    TeachingHistory Companion

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    Two things I did that I'm pretty sure helped me get the interview I had yesterday. 1) I added English to my certification and 2) I included my brochure which is very short and to the point about my teaching style and philosophy. Which, after I got called for the interview, I researched the school/principals more, and realized the way I teach is what the principal has been pushing for the past 6 years. (Literacy and student-centered)

    The thing is, before I applied I had no idea that they were looking for what I had. It was sheer luck that it worked out.

    I have been playing the waiting game for over a year, and it stinks. I've subbed for a year, and may be doing it again this year. As much as I would love my own classroom, you do learn a lot subbing, and you can still make connections with the kids.

    You'll find something. Good Luck!
     
  13. TeachingHistory

    TeachingHistory Companion

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    Oh, I also forgot... I don't coach. BUT I can help with technical theater and marching band, especially because this is such a small school. So even if you can't do the stereotypical extracurriculars, find SOMETHING you would be able to assist the school with.
     
  14. MsManda3

    MsManda3 Rookie

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    Aug 3, 2011

    I graduated in 2009 as well and didn't get any interviews until this summer. I was certified EC-4 Generalist in TX...just like a lot of other candidates! I decided to get certified in 4-8 Generalist as well, and subbed for 2 years. I was very lucky to get long-term substitute jobs in 2010 and this past spring. Subbing is a great way to network. While the district I subbed in had major cuts, I am still someone in mind for positions that may open.

    My advice? Apply anywhere within your area. Make sure that you check district websites AT LEAST once a week and apply for anything within your certification. Also, extra certifications, especially ESL or Special Education really help. I got certified in ESL per recommendation from the P of one of my long-term sub jobs. Personally hand in your cover letter and resume to P's or their secretaries at campuses (but check with the district and/or campus first!!) or email every P for positions/districts you apply to. And lastly, have hope and faith. Getting an interview can and WILL happen!
    I've been searching, hoping, and praying for 2 years...if I can land 2 interviews this year, I know an interview is coming your way. Good luck!
     

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