In-District Transfer/Letters of Rec

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by pineapplecake, Mar 6, 2015.

  1. pineapplecake

    pineapplecake Rookie

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    Mar 6, 2015

    Last school year, I was hired at the high school where I student taught on a contingency that the school board would approve adding a position after the first 10 days of school because of high numbers. I set up my classroom and worked for 13 days, only to find out that my position was NOT approved.

    However, a middle school position WAS approved. I "interviewed" and was offered the job on the spot.

    At the end of last year, I spoke to my principal before I wrote on my letter of intent that I was interested in transferring to the high school. My principal understood and was expecting it.

    There were no open positions, and he asked me to come back to the middle school. This year, I once again told him that I prefer high school age students. There are TWO positions opening at the high school this year. My principal was very understanding and told me to let him know what he can do for me. (I was too nervous to realize that meant I should ask for a recommendation letter!) He also assured me that he would like me to come back if the high school goes with someone else.

    I emailed the high school principal with my resume and cover letter to express my interest. She emailed me back to say that she would be conducting emails in late April and she would be in contact.

    She has already hired me once, so I'm not really sure what to expect here. I hear the competition is fierce, so I feel like I should ask my P and APs to write some letters of recommendation. Is it okay to email them, or should I ask in person? It feels so awkward to acknowledge that they are my second choice, even though we have all known it from the beginning.

    TL;DR Should I ask for a letter of rec in person or via email, and what should I take to my interview? Observations, student data, lesson plans?
     
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  3. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    Mar 6, 2015

    I've never needed a letter of recommendation to transfer in district. The principals will talk to each other, but that step was always skipped because I was a current employee. Maybe ask someone in your district if you even need them.
     
  4. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Mar 6, 2015

    I think you should be thankful to have the MS position you have. If the HS valued your short time with them, you'll have an edge. See where the road takes you but I wouldn't be making too big a deal about preferring hs over what you've currently got.....a bird in the hand and all that...
     
  5. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Mar 7, 2015

    The irony is that I am in HS, wishing I was in MS. But I am with Czacza - bird in the hand trumps me actively seeking a MS position, since I have coworkers I enjoy, make a good salary, and feel that the administration is fair in all dealings, and seem very interested in supporting their staff at every opportunity. I have said before that I have taken the "scenic route" to where I am today, and I sometimes just smile and figure that my GPS must have gotten a little flummoxed - I should have ended up a few miles down the road, at the MS, but I think I can stay where I am for now and see how this fits. If I were looking for another job now, it would only be to drastically shorten my commute. I would rather stay with this school and colleagues who support each other than end up in a situation that seems perfect on paper, but terrible in reality.

    First rule of interviewing for any new job, however, is to refrain from bad-mouthing, in any way, the school or administration you have been working with for the last two years. This is even more important since it is in the same district, and the administrators will talk among themselves - believe that.

    Have you taught HS before? Just curious about the overwhelming desire to teach HS over MS. The one problem I potentially see is that interviewing in late April is, well, late. How would you feel if the MS replaced you, and then the HS didn't hire you? I would consider these options. The last time I saw a HS interview for a science teacher slot in the spring, they received over 160 applications for the one position. They didn't make a final decision until July, and by then the candidate they went with had to get permission to leave the district she was with, without the 60 day notice being enforced.

    Do what you feel you must, but I second the opinions that you should minimize your preference for the HS job while leaving the MS job hanging, especially since it is the same district. Honestly, if you have kept an application on file with the HS but they haven't called you for these positions, I would be a little nervous and concerned about the fact that you weren't given a head's up about the openings, especially since it would be a transfer within the district. I hope you get what you want, but please be very careful not to burn any bridges in the process.

    Good luck.
     
  6. pineapplecake

    pineapplecake Rookie

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    Mar 10, 2015

    I am definitely letting my principal know how much I love this building and all the adults in it. They know I'm grateful to be here, and that I absolutely want to stay if the high school goes another direction.

    And I *was* given a heads up about the positions--they're not posted yet!

    I think I'm going to ask for the letters and hope for the best! I was hired for this job before, so why can't it happen again?
     

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