In Class Reading

Discussion in 'Middle School / Junior High' started by QE1, Sep 11, 2011.

  1. QE1

    QE1 Rookie

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    Sep 11, 2011

    I'm hoping someone might have some ideas for how to structure in class reading. Our school only has one class set of our literature books, so the students can't take them home to read, but have to read them in class. Right now I'm thinking of playing the audio book while they read along and do double entry journals and then we take a class to have discussions etc. Has anyone else had to do this before? How did you structure it?
     
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  3. Elocin

    Elocin Comrade

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    Sep 12, 2011

    I do in-class reading. It is tough because it takes up SO much time (I have 70 mins). We read along with the CD, discuss as we read, then I do a mini lesson on a skill or strategy and then they apply the strategies independently (compare and contrast 2 characters, find 2 examples of figurative language in the chapter and rewrite, draw picture of the scene, "quote and note" for inferencing)

    2x a week I try to focus mainly on writing and grammar but try to write about the book we are reading. It is really hard to squeeze writing in....I always feel behind.

    I also do bellringers with grammar and journals.
     
  4. Milsey

    Milsey Habitué

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    Sep 13, 2011

    I only spent about 20-25 mins on reading, less for poetry. In one class total silence was rare, so I assigned reading for homework. Strategies I used were making predictions, drawing inferences, summarizing what you've read, etc.
     
  5. WaterfallLady

    WaterfallLady Enthusiast

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    Sep 13, 2011

    Just a thought:
    How do you plan to teach them comprehension strategies listening to the tape? Yes, that will let them listen along. How will it help them think?

    Kids need role models, they need people to stop reading and show meta-cognition, etc. Try looking up "think alouds" and "metacognition" in relation to teaching reading. I can't think of a good website off-hand.
     
  6. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Sep 13, 2011

    Wow. That's about half the time my class spends on reading! You might want to do some professional reading on amount of time spent reading and student achievement. I would suggest starting with anything by Richard Allington.
     
  7. Rosy0114

    Rosy0114 Rookie

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    Sep 13, 2011

    Then Gen Ed LA teacher on my team does a combination of activities. Their books stay in the classroom as well. She takes about half a class to do a pre-teach or mini lesson on a comprehension strategy, or story parts, etc. I have seen 2/3 strategies she uses to get through the class reading. Our entire district emphasizes the use of Cornell notes. Usually the teacher will read aloud to the class and guide them through the notes - setting up the questions in relation to the reading strategy she is teaching, and discussing the answers briefly. The students then have some freedom to fill in the right side of the Cornell notes themselves. She does not believe in popcorn reading or choosing readers b/c she worries about bullying due to lack of reading fluency. However, she will occasionally take volunteers. After she has done a guided note section with them on one short story, she will usually have them read a story independently and take their Cornell notes on the own - mimicking the skill and notes they did in a guided manner with the previous story.
    So far, I think it works out well.
    I pull my ESS students and do a small group read-aloud for the second story. We take Cornell notes as a class. Then they have questions about the story to answer independently. I'm hoping to eventually phase out the reliance on a verbal reader - although that's not guaranteed. My kids with lower reading comprehension skills just aren't ready to read independently and search out the answers.
     
  8. QE1

    QE1 Rookie

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    Sep 13, 2011

    I did start with a think aloud of sorts. I modeled how I attack a book that is difficult for me and modeled double entry notes. I'm using the CD because I have a lot of ELL students mixed in with high readers and I was told by my VP to use it. I will do more research into showing metacognition and the like.


    My biggest concern is dealing with the students that are absent. I can keep them in during lunch so that they can catch up, but I don't have enough books to be able to lend any out overnight.
     
  9. Elocin

    Elocin Comrade

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    Sep 14, 2011

    Do you have a homeroom period? Sometimes I'll have my absent students reading during homeroom.
     

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