Immigrant Students

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Stacey, Nov 20, 2011.

  1. Stacey

    Stacey New Member

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    Nov 20, 2011

    Most of the teachers in our region are highly unprepared for immigrant students that are moving into the area. I'm wondering how other teachers are handling the challenges. How prepared do you feel to teach students who don't speak English? What is your school doing, or what should they be doing to get us ready?
     
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  3. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    My school has a 30% Asian population as well as families from other countries outside of America. We have an excellent ESL program.
     
  4. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    I'm not prepared at all. But I teach teenagers so IMO, it doesn't matter as much as the younger grades. We have an ESL dept. that I use as a resource when needed.
     
  5. callmebob

    callmebob Enthusiast

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    There is not a lot that is done for the general teachers. There is an ELL program and some "requirements" for gen. ed. teachers and that is about it. Nothing more should be done for most that don't speak the language.
     
  6. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    Nothing more should be done?

    I hope I read this wrong.
     
  7. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    You could learn about the cultural norms and mores of the immigrant groups that make up your school population. There may be predominant behavior or learning styles.
     
  8. isabunny

    isabunny Comrade

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    The college I received my teacher education from in California required all students to be ESOL certified. It was part of the teacher prep program. We learned many strategies to teach english as a second language. Those students are still required to preform (pass) the state testing, even if they just moved to this country a week before the test. Also, many of the families migrate around the region for work so they are constantly moving in and out of schools, or going to their home countries for a month over the Christmas break (but they can be gone for more than four weeks). It is quite difficult for the teachers in that state to organize and plan around these situations.
     
  9. maya5250

    maya5250 Comrade

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    We have a large Asian and African population at my school. We have a significant latino student population also. Last year, we had a small number of Russians.
    We are a very diverse school with a high number of reduced/free lunches. We have ESL teachers to assist them and they are pulled out for language art to be with ESL teacher for language art if needed.
     
  10. callmebob

    callmebob Enthusiast

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    You did not. I believe plenty, if not more than enough is done already.
     
  11. Enseignante<3

    Enseignante<3 Companion

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    I teach in the mushroom capital of the world - that means a lot of mexican migrant workers. We have an excellent ESL program. Personally though, in my fourth grade classroom, I worry that I'm not doing enough for my ELL's. I am always in contact with their ESL teacher, but I still am unsure that I am helping them in the way they really need. With 20 other kids in the class, I can't give each of them the individual help they always need.
     
  12. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Virtuoso

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    We don't have any kind of ELL/ESL program.

    I have had one student who was a non-native English speaker. He was fluent in English, and did not struggle any more than some of my native English speakers. He spoke French.

    We had two students who spoke Chinese, and no English. They were sent to a nearby university for an intensive English language-learner program for the remainder of the school year.
     
  13. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    We have a high latino population. We have a transitional bilingual program where students can learn to read and write in Spanish as well as English in k-2. In 3rd grade they still get several ESL classes per week, but they switch to learning in all English. We've had some training on cultural norms (luckily for us, most of our families are not only all from Mexico but actually for the most part from the same area in Mexico) so we can understand how to best interact with these families and know the reasoning behind some things that they do. It's one of the few PD sessions I've attended in my district that I thought was extremely helpful.
     
  14. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    In California, teachers have to be CLAD certified, which means they will/are prepared to deal with EL students.
     
  15. pete2770

    pete2770 Comrade

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    It's not the kids' fault that they've been uprooted and transplanted to a foreign nation/culture/location. I don't want to start a flame war, so I'll leave it at that.
     
  16. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Ditto.
     
  17. SpecSub

    SpecSub Comrade

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    I think it would matter as much, if not more, at the high school level. ELLs are the highest risk group for dropping out of school for several reasons that include: lack of English proficiency and falling behind in school, need to work to assist their families financially, and because their cultures may not value higher education.

    ELLs typically take 5-6 years to become proficient enough in English to be academically on-level with their peers. The older students are when they enter the U.S. schools, the harder it is for them to learn English. Also, many of them had poor or no formal schooling in their home schools, making them even further behind here.
     
  18. SpecSub

    SpecSub Comrade

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    I have found that we can use many of the same accomodations with our ELLs as we do with our special ed students. Some of these accomodations, and even modifications, can be written into ESOL formal education plans and utilized on standardized testing.

    In instruction, we have used: verbatim reading, scribing, visual cues, graphic organizers, rephrased directions, teacher-prepared notes, chunked assignments, leveled readers, etc.

    On the state testing, we have used many of those accomodations as well as extended time.
     
  19. callmebob

    callmebob Enthusiast

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    I will say that I agree with you that it is not the students fault. It is a political and social issue though.
     
  20. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    It is a political and social issue.

    It does not apply to me as much as it does the lower grades because American ESL students have had plenty of opportunity to learn the language by the time they come to me. If they were born here they've had 15 years to learn the language. It should not, and is not, a huge issue because of the practice they have had.

    Students that move here to follow their parents' work generally realize the onus for learning the language and culture is on them. They work hard at doing what is expected. Students that do not come from families that believe this, are not going to have a huge respect for education anyhow, and typically do not last long in the system.
     

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