Immediate Consequences

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by kinderteacher20, Dec 6, 2006.

  1. kinderteacher20

    kinderteacher20 Rookie

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    Dec 6, 2006

    I have a boy in Kindergarten who I think is definitely displaying signs of ADD. He is unable to stand still in line for more than two seconds, has difficulty sitting still on the carpet and completing work independently. To deal with a lot of the attention issues, I have been letting him squeeze one of those apple stress balls. This has seemed to help a lot. The problem I have been having with him is his poor choice habits. He will often do things that he knows are wrong--most of the time bothering the other students or inappropriately touch them. I have reminded him to ask himself before he does anything if what he is doing is right or wrong. This does not seem to be helping too much, nor does taking away recess privileges. I was thinking maybe if there was some immediate consequence following the undesired behavior, that might have a bigger effect on him. I was thinking time out somewhere in the room. If anyone has any opinions or other suggestions, I would greatly appreciate them. Or, if someone is/has been in a similar situation, what they did to solve the problem. Thanks a lot!
     
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  3. myKroom

    myKroom Habitué

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    Dec 6, 2006

    I have a little guy in the same situation. Mine also has anger/frustration problems. These are fairly new problems so I don't have a lot of ideas...I'm still experimenting with some things. In his particular situation I have found that time out and taking away recess really doesn't phase my student. In all honesty it only makes him more frustrated! He also misses out on directions/lesson time, which for a student with ADD doesn't help much. As of now I have started using picture cues as reminders for how to sit on the carpet, how to stand in line, etc. I keep the cards with me and when needed I will hand them to him and have him check to make sure he is doing the appropriate thing. I also have a deal/goal with him about his work. If he gets his work finished and follows directions over a certain period of time (two days) he gets to have extra free play time. He has been very motivated to get his work done, knowing that it is associated with a positive, not a negative! I guess what I'm getting at, is try having him work toward something he wants, instead of a negative time out. For example, for every X minutes of sitting appropriately he earns a point toward his goal. Start the goal off easy at first and then make it a little harder each time. After each group time talk to him and let him see what he has earned and how much farther he has left to go! I'm still working on it with mine student, but it's working fairly well.
    Give it a try, hope it helps a little.
     
  4. kinderteacher20

    kinderteacher20 Rookie

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    Dec 6, 2006

    Thank you for your ideas. I would like to try those. However, the big problem I am having with him now is his interactions with the other students. Like today, one of the students was holding a pin in his hand and "this student" just went up and smacked it out of his hand...For no reason. Would you suggest a time out for that kind of behavior or something else?
     
  5. myKroom

    myKroom Habitué

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    Dec 7, 2006

    I guess it would depend on how frequent that behavior is! If it is constantly happening then I'm not sure how much good a time out would do...you don't want him in time out all day. It also depends on whether you think time outs are effective for this student...the important thing is that you explain why the time out has occurred!You had said before that you remind him about the choices he is making...have you tried using picture cues with that also? In the situation you said above I would maybe try getting some picture cues of his bad choices and then some picture cues of appropriate choices. (For example, hitting someone vs. keeping hands to self.) When he has made a bad choice have him show you the bad choice picture cue and then show you the picture cue that would have been a better choice. (I hope that makes sense!!) Sometimes the visual can be a little more effective then just talking to them. This would be something you could couple with the time out. So when his time out is over he has to explain (show you) his choices. Good luck...hope that helps!
     

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