I'm tutoring an incoming first grader...

Discussion in 'First Grade' started by minnie, Jun 12, 2009.

  1. minnie

    minnie Habitué

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2007
    Messages:
    764
    Likes Received:
    53

    Jun 12, 2009

    A friend of mine has a son who is going into the first grade. She wanted me to test him to see if he is ready because she had some concerns at how far behind he was. Well, I tested him and he definitely needs a lot of help.

    * Knows 15/26 of uppercase letters
    *Knows 17/26 lowercase letters
    * only knows 7 of his letter sounds. Does not know vowel sounds.
    * Cannot blend sounds together to decode simple CVC words and if I blend them for him he still cannot identify the word.
    *is unable to identify the first and last sounds of words
    * only knows numbers 0-10. If is show him the number 15, he'll say
    "one, five." If I show him 24, he'll say, "two, four."

    He does not have any disabilities. I told her I would work with him two days a week for about 30 minutes. I will do it more often if I need to. I am a little overwhelmed at how behind he is and how short the summer is. My question is: Where do I start? What are the most important concepts I should work with him on first? As a first grade teacher, what would you like your students to know right off the bat?
     
  2.  
  3. Erin Elizabeth

    Erin Elizabeth Groupie

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2005
    Messages:
    1,254
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 12, 2009

    I would focus on letter ID and letter sounds.
     
  4. minnie

    minnie Habitué

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2007
    Messages:
    764
    Likes Received:
    53

    Jun 12, 2009

    Thanks! :) I'll start with that. Any other suggestions?
     
  5. cmgeorge626

    cmgeorge626 Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2007
    Messages:
    145
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 13, 2009

    I agree with Erin Elizabeth, we expect kids to ID and know letter sounds before entering 1st (along with knowing #'s to 20). If they can do that, I can go from there without a problem. The good thing is, that is something that is easy to make fun activities for.

    Blending and final/inital sounds are something we repeat a lot in first anyway.
     
  6. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2007
    Messages:
    2,483
    Likes Received:
    204

    Jun 13, 2009

    In terms of priority:

    Oral blending
    Letter sounds - esp vowels.
    Lowercase ID (Uppercase is important, but not as vital as lowercase)
    Decoding CVC words

    Everything else you mentioned, along with the most common high frequency sight words.

    I generally get very depressed if I have a lot of kids at that level in September. All I can say is good luck and what you are doing is very important.
     
  7. Kat53

    Kat53 Devotee

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2006
    Messages:
    1,071
    Likes Received:
    12

    Jun 13, 2009

    Oral blending and segmenting are definitely a priority. So are letter sounds. You should spend 5 minutes before each lesson with a phonemic awareness warm-up, before moving into phonics. No matter how strong the letter/sound recognition is, the student will have trouble blending if he/she is low in phonemic awareness.
     
  8. skittleroo

    skittleroo Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2008
    Messages:
    1,958
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 13, 2009

    sounds like you need to start with phonemic awareness first. Play with language, silly poems etc.
    as a first grade teacher, I would be very concerned for this child. Not being able to blend is one thing, but if he can't put tell the word even when you blend each sound he lacks phonemic awareness. He will not be able to read until he can do this at the listening stage. Also, he will need to work on letters and sounds.

    Did mom not consider having him repeat kinder?? I just know where we start first at, he will be extremely behind. Yes he would receive extra help, but he would wind up feeling very overwhelmed. Repeating a grade (especially at this age) is not a punishment. It is a gift of an additional year of learning (for kids that need it).
     
  9. skittleroo

    skittleroo Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2008
    Messages:
    1,958
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 13, 2009

    how high can he count? I know our standard are for them to count to 100. Even my lowest kids can count to 30-40.
    As for not understanding 15 is not 1 and 5. You begin with counting. Work on counting and recognizing the value of what you count.

    But I wouldn't be as concerned with the math as I would be with the reading. So, I would spend most of my time working on reading.

    Does he know any sight words? those are super important. Kids cannot take off as reader unless they have a store of at least a couple dozen sight words (am, at, the, can, be, look, like, little, etc.) These simply must be memorized. You can make him his own word wall and do fun activities to help him remember these words such as writing in shaving cream, etc.
     
  10. love_reading

    love_reading Comrade

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2006
    Messages:
    420
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 13, 2009

    Don't forget to use some of the time for writing! If you can, I would meet for 45 minutes. That way you would have time to do some word work, reading, and writing.
     
  11. minnie

    minnie Habitué

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2007
    Messages:
    764
    Likes Received:
    53

    Jun 13, 2009

    Wow! Thank you all so much! I have never tutored anyone before. Should I do the activities that I did with my kindergartners? I'm not sure because it will be at my house, not in the classroom so how do I present the activities?

    This little guy went to a school that does not have a very good reputation. I saw his report card and he got an E in rhyming, recognizing letters, and sounds which I am VERY confused at. I'm wondering if he didn't try his best with me. He wasn't shy or anything, but if I showed him a letter, he would hesitate for awhile and just say any letter. Why did he get an E on his report card but couldn't do it for me? :huh:

    I did not see how high he could count, but his mom said he can write his numbers up to 100.
     
  12. lemonhead

    lemonhead Aficionado

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Messages:
    3,563
    Likes Received:
    4

    Jun 13, 2009

    My goodness, I can see why she's worried.

    I'd focus on blending. Maybe you can use arm motions. I remember tutoring a boy and he could not blend at all. It is kind of maddening. He seemed bright enough but to get him to put sounds together or to segment was really a chore.

    I'd also drill on letter sounds and id of the lowercase letters first then upper. He should also be writing these.

    I'd worry less about math but I would have a hundreds chart and work on counting and skip counting. I sort of doubt he can write his numbers to 100 but maybe.
     
  13. skittleroo

    skittleroo Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2008
    Messages:
    1,958
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 15, 2009

    lemonhead, i agree with write to 100 - that is advanced for beginning first grade.

    I also agree that if all you do is focus on reading and writing (because the two are one) you will do him a great service. Math (although very important) can come second. This child has to get some of these reading skills down asap.
     
  14. lemonhead

    lemonhead Aficionado

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Messages:
    3,563
    Likes Received:
    4

    Jun 15, 2009

    Yeah, especially with calling 15, one five.
     
  15. minnie

    minnie Habitué

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2007
    Messages:
    764
    Likes Received:
    53

    Jun 16, 2009

    Can you explain the arm motion?
     
  16. Kat53

    Kat53 Devotee

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2006
    Messages:
    1,071
    Likes Received:
    12

    Jun 17, 2009

    Here's how I've done blending on the arm. The initial sound is at the shoulder. The vowel goes in the crease and the final sound down at the wrist. Say the sounds while touching that part of the arm,then sweep down again to blend the word.
    /c/ touch shoulder
    /a/ touch crease
    /t/ touch wrist
    /cat/ slide hand down arm.


    Some kids really respond to this strategy. This is best used for words that only have three sounds.
     
  17. minnie

    minnie Habitué

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2007
    Messages:
    764
    Likes Received:
    53

    Jun 17, 2009

    That's sad that I've never heard of that before. :eek: That's a great idea though! Thank you!
     
  18. skittleroo

    skittleroo Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2008
    Messages:
    1,958
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 17, 2009

    yes it is a way to make phonemic awarenss visual and kinesthetic - for those who need it.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. Colliemom,
  2. Missy,
  3. sevenplus
Total: 265 (members: 3, guests: 220, robots: 42)
test