I'm terrified!!

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by MsK, Aug 28, 2009.

  1. MsK

    MsK Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2008
    Messages:
    44
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 28, 2009

    Hello all. I was just hired as a special education teaching assistant for an 8:1:1 classroom. There are 6 students in the class. I start school on Wednesday and just got the student's IEPs in the mail today. I am so overwhelmed with the amount of information to read and remember! Most of the students are nonverbal and half are identified as autistic. Any suggestions on the best way to handle all of this info? Words of wisdom?
     
  2.  
  3. karebear76

    karebear76 Habitué

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2005
    Messages:
    987
    Likes Received:
    3

    Aug 28, 2009

    I don't know that I would stress out about this yet. I'd definitely look to see if there are any students with definite triggers and try to remember those things. Prevention is a wonderful thing. I think once you meet the students & are able to put faces with names, then the information becomes personal and more memorable. I don't work with this population but I would think that what I said would be valid.
     
  4. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    27,534
    Likes Received:
    6

    Aug 28, 2009

    I'm not special ed, but I would get 6 different colored folders and start summarizing the notes for myself.
     
  5. AspieTeacher

    AspieTeacher Comrade

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2005
    Messages:
    406
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 29, 2009

    Ms K,

    I have worked with students with autism for about 7 1/2 years and one thing to remember is that they like to be on a "schedule" so that they know what to expect. A "visual schedule" which helps them "see" what is going to happen next during transitions gives them that sense of "security" so they don't feel overwhelmed. Also, students with autism need "activity schedules" which breaks the activity into "visual steps" giving them "visual instructions" on how to perform the activity" and then it also gives them an idea of what is going to happen next. Be prepared that students with autism have tremendous communication difficulties and they respond physically sometimes. I would ask your teacher about your student as far as behaviors are concerned: bite, kick, spit, yell, scream, pica (eat non-foods), throw objects, run away, ect. Remember a behavior is: observable, measurable. They also need "visual barriers" which the teacher should be able to explain to you. You will need to be trained with "restraint techniques" AND DO NOT DO ANY RESTRAINT until you have been trained and told that you are allowed to do so. DOCUMENT any behavior that occurs, and what triggers that behavior. Even if the student gets a small scratch, DOCUMENT that behavior which caused the scratch to occur. No matter how young they are, students with autism have an incredible amount of strength. They will need a place which is sensory-free so they can calm down when they have a meltdown. Your student may require "immediate reinforcers" to get a task completed. A visual token board is best for this kind of response. I would ask the teacher what he/she wants you to do and your responsibilities.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 202 (members: 0, guests: 189, robots: 13)
test