I'm on a roll...another question..how do you choose a school?

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by MsBee, Jul 10, 2009.

  1. MsBee

    MsBee Devotee

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    Jul 10, 2009

    So I have potentially three interviews in one week. EXCITING.

    Lets just say I am the best interviewer in the world and blow their socks off ;););););) and they all offer me a job.

    What makes you choose between a school? I just want a job so I'll pretty much take almost anything at this point.

    Do you look at the grade level?
    Friendliness of the staff?
    Low SES, High SES?
    How the principal is toward you?

    I have no idea.
     
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  3. Jobsearching101

    Jobsearching101 Companion

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    Jul 10, 2009

    I would look at the location and grade level, then the staff, then the principal- in that order.
     
  4. MsBee

    MsBee Devotee

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    Location doesn't matter to me since I am relocating.
    I would say Staff, grade level, principal then location.
     
  5. TeacherShelly

    TeacherShelly Aficionado

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    If you have choices, look into the district, too. Do they support the teachers?
     
  6. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    I would think staff, support, grade level, principal, location.
     
  7. KinderESLtchr

    KinderESLtchr Rookie

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    I have always worked in a Title I school with low to low middle SES. They usually have very good diversity (something I like very much--when I taught in Charlotte we had 14 languages spoken at home by the children on my grade level alone) and yes location does matter since you don't want to be driving far to your school if possible (although bad to say in an interview.) The principal is a huge part. You want someone who will trust your professional judgement and support you as an educator, not only "backing you up" but also supporting you in your professional development and continued learning. Micromanagers are awful. I would check their AYP status as well to see how the school has been performing (my school is going to have an " exemplary educator" next year as we are now considered a "high priority" school and I have heard many different things about what this person does and how it will affect our teaching and planning on a daily basis.) Sometimes it is very hard to actually have good insight into the staff before you take a job (unless you have subbed in the school or something.) Look up as much on the schools as you can and know their possible differences--then you can make the best possible decision for you that will put you at a school where you'll be happy teaching!
     
  8. rachaelski

    rachaelski Habitué

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    To me, I was looking for a trust and positive relationship between me and the P. I had a horrible year with a horrible P, so I wanted to be in a school where I believed the leadership was the strongest and most progressive. I was offered 4 jobs (will the pay varying 10,000 dollars) and I chose the one that thought would have the best leadership.
     
  9. Yank7

    Yank7 Habitué

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    I think it is important that you choose the school where you find a cooperative staff and an understanding administration. Check the schools out online and see what they do academically.If possible try to speak to other teachers in the school about their experiences.
     
  10. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Don't be afraid to trust your instincts. All things being relatively equal, your intuitive feelings will tell you a lot.
     
  11. MsBee

    MsBee Devotee

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    Jul 11, 2009

    Yea my first interview...the vibe I got from that I knew I wouldn't take the job if offered. They didn't offer to me and I was okay with that.
     
  12. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    Jul 11, 2009

    MsBee,
    Location is important -- some locations are just more desirable than others. That being said -- if you are fortunate enough to do group interviews, make sure you write down the name of each person on the interviewing committee. This is essential. If you know a teacher in the area, they may be able to link you up with one of these people, so you can ask some questions. But if not, you can talk to the people at the local association (Virginia doens't have unions) and ask if they have an association member at the school you are considering that they can put you in touch with. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't.
     
  13. MsBee

    MsBee Devotee

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    How do you go about writing everyones names down?
    When they tell you do you write it or just try to remember until the end?
     
  14. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    Jul 11, 2009

    When they are introducing themselves, simply open your note book and say "I hope you don't mind if I write your names down -- I wouldn't want to forget anybody." Even if all you get is a phonetic spelling, you can always call the school secretary or receptionist later, and ask how it is spelled. You also need the names for when you send your thank you notes.

    I always quickly draw a rectangle to represent the table and write the names where the people are sitting -- this way I can associate the name with the face later.

    As soon as I leave I jot down one thing next to each name that will remind me of that person -- such as "2nd grade teacher with big ear-rings" or "5th grade teacher with Bugs Bunny tie" or "Reading Specialist with heavy southern accent." Anything that will help me put a face with the name later. You always think you are going to remember, but the names all run together later, and you get people confused.

    This really can help when it comes time to write thank you letters later, because you can often think of something personal to say and be sure you are refering to the correct person.

    Because I used to interview so many people in my former profession, I learned the trick of writing notes without looking down at my paper. It isn't hard to learn, and it means you can mantain eye contact while taking brief notes. While I learned it to help me be a better interviewer, it has helped me later in life when I was being interviewed. Just jotting down one or two words can help you remember so much.
     
  15. MsBee

    MsBee Devotee

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    Jul 11, 2009

    Oh okay. I just feel funny asking to jot their names down. Wont they all just stare at me and watch me write. I don't know. Luckily my interviews have only been with one to two people.
    This time it will be with the grade level teams. Maybe I can go to the website and look.
     
  16. Simba

    Simba Comrade

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    Jul 12, 2009

    They know why you are REALLY asking for their names and will respect that!

    Don't worry if it feels uncomfortable. It is absolutely necessary!!

    Good Luck!!
     

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