IL NCLB "Highly qualified"

Discussion in 'Special Education Archives' started by MsTeckel, Apr 11, 2006.

  1. MsTeckel

    MsTeckel Comrade

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    Apr 11, 2006

    I am so confused by the NCLB law. I know special education teachers need to be highly qualified and in IL and I think in most other states they are qualifed if they have full certification and do not teach content areas. I am confused by the "content areas" What special education teacher teach content areas? I am in a AZ teacher prep program through the University of Phoenix and I will be getting a full certification but in order to teach content areas I would need to get endorsed in elementary.

    What kind of special education classrooms can I teach in without teaching content areas? I hope I am not confusing anyone and someone can help me out here. Hope someone understands what Im asking here. Thanks
    Amy
     
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  3. lisap

    lisap Companion

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    Apr 12, 2006

    I can only speak to what I do in my district. I do have certification in math which is a great assset when teaching special ed. I am at the high school level so I have many students each year who are not able to keep up with the pace and requirments of the regular ed classes. We do have some "pull-out" classes. I have taught math, english, work skills, and a few other independent courses. I am also certified in School-to-Work. I do not have a certification in English, but when teaching in the special ed setting, I don't think it is required (at least I hope not!).
     
  4. MsTeckel

    MsTeckel Comrade

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    Apr 12, 2006

    Im not teaching yet. I am not certified until I finish my masters and get my AZ certification switched over to IL (I live in IL) Im just concerned that I will not get a job if Im not highly qualifed. The school I want to REALLY want to teach in a non for profit agency for children with autism. I dont know if they go by NCLB but they require their teachers to be certified. I have bout a year left to go, so im pretty much worrying for nothing right now cuz the laws can change and stuff, esp when Bush is out of office. Im just confused.
     
  5. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Apr 13, 2006

    Somehow I doubt that the subject-matter-knowledge requirements of NCLB are going to go away, partly because the states already have various mechanisms in place and partly because it could be political suicide for even a Democrat to suggest scrapping the requirement.

    You need to ask about the regulations where you intend to become certified. In California, those who seek the special education credential do indeed have to demonstrate subject area competence, mostly by passing CSET-Multiple Subjects (though there is some discussion as to the circumstances under which a special education teacher MUST have CSET-MS or MUST have a single-subject CSET exam; stay tuned). If you can pull it off, you're probably best off doing what it takes to be certified and highly qualified. If that means taking a test, well, c'mon over to the Examinations for Teacher forum and we'll see what we can do for you.
     
  6. S. T. Knave

    S. T. Knave Rookie

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    Apr 14, 2006

    Hi,

    It's so confusing I think because each state has their own rules. Most states say you need: a bachelor's degree, a state issued certificate in the area you are teaching (which will be difficult through an online institution since your state has to issue the certificate), and proof that you know what you're doing (usually Praxis I or Praxis II scores). Does this help?
     
  7. Lesley

    Lesley Habitué

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    Apr 14, 2006

    Indiana also gives the option of 100 points on a rubric created by the DOE for veteran teachers. You receive so many points for the number years taught, any courses in core subject areas, committees dealing with core subject areas, there is a list of items and if you reach 100 points one is considered Highly Qualified. They also have other ways of figuring highly qualified, but I cannot think of them right now.
     
  8. jhamm57

    jhamm57 Rookie

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    May 12, 2006

    I got my "highly qualified" status by doing workshops, and providing an agenda and signed form to document the hours. My undergraduate degree was in Elementary Education. I also have cert. in LD, MR, and Blind and/or Partially Sighted. So as long as I was doing special ed at the elementary level, I was OK. My state requires at least 90 hours to become "highly cert." We also get credit for years taught. They allow 45 hours for 15 yrs. teaching. We also have a program called LINCS
     
  9. jhamm57

    jhamm57 Rookie

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    May 12, 2006

    sorry. i think i hit the wrong button..................at any rate there are different ways to get the hours you need to become "highly qualified."
     
  10. TeachSp.Ed.

    TeachSp.Ed. New Member

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    May 23, 2006

    I have been teaching for 27 years. In Georgia to be highly qualified and certified to teach in a self-contained sp. ed. classroom, I had to take the PRAXIS in Special Education: Content Knowledge (Lang. Arts, Math, Science, and Social Studies). I passed.
    I have not taught or had a social studies class in 30 years.
    Also NCLB has changed my certification in Georgia. I am NOW certified to teach MID, EBD, and LD. My certificate states Sp. Ed.
    Pat,
     

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