IEP question

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by purpley, Jul 4, 2013.

  1. purpley

    purpley New Member

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    Jul 4, 2013

    Hello everyone! I am studying to be a special education teacher and am confused on the IEP process for new students added to a caseload. If I were teaching 7th grade and had new students that had IEPs since they were in 3rd grade, what do I do with the existing IEP from previous years? Do I just add on to it, or is a completely new IEP made for each student (regardless of how long they have been in the special education program)? Thanks for your help!
     
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  3. Special-t

    Special-t Enthusiast

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    Jul 4, 2013

    If the are coming from a different school district you hold a meeting within 30 days to write an IEP for your district. You use the info from the prior IEP to create the updated one.
     
  4. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Jul 4, 2013

    This, exactly.

    Wrightslaw may be of some help - http://www.wrightslaw.com/
     
  5. purpley

    purpley New Member

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    Jul 4, 2013

    So it's starting a new IEP for the student but putting prior info into it? If the student is in the same district just going to a different grade is it the same thing? Thanks for your responses! :)
     
  6. karebear76

    karebear76 Habitué

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    Jul 4, 2013

    I create a new IEP for each student, at least once each calendar year, regardless of how long the student has been identified. The prior documents stay in the child's file, but influence the current IEP. As the teacher, it is my job to utilize any data that is available to help design the IEP. I use progress reports, triennial evaluation data, psychologist reports, classroom observations, curriculum based assessments, standardized test results, and any medical information.

    The IEP meeting must be held at least once each calendar year (minus one day). For example, a student entering my class this fall with an IEP meeting date of September 30, 2012, will need to have a meeting held no later than September 29, 2013. If the team agrees that a goal has not been mastered and continues to be appropriate, then we can keep it.

    Hope this helps some.
     
  7. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Jul 4, 2013

    If the students is in the same district but going into a different grade chunks of it can stay the same, but certain things have to change, like the present levels of performance and goals.
     
  8. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

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    Jul 4, 2013

    This.

    We make a new IEP every year, but sometimes I am able to copy/paste things and update data.
     
  9. ITeachSDCkids

    ITeachSDCkids Rookie

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    Jul 15, 2013

    IEP Time Frame

    In my district if a student is transitioning within the same district (elementary to middle school) a Transition IEP Meeting is held at the end of the year for the upcoming year. Changes made are school name, often service hours for speech and language and total hours in special ed and gen ed. Any parent concerns are noted, etc. This gives us time to discuss levels with the current teacher for planning. The IEP goals ordinarily do not change since that is reviewed annually and we only make changes as we would for any student during the year..if there is a reason to (the student mastered a goal early or a goal is too challenging, etc.) Doesn't your district have a policy about how this is handled?
     
  10. catlover

    catlover Rookie

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    Jul 15, 2013

    You would likely use some of the information from the previous IEPs, but it would technically be a new IEP that you write. Each IEP is only good for a year (or less), so even if the new one is pretty similar to the old one, it would be considered a separate document.

    I would also warn against relying on the previous IEP too much. I work at a high school, and we constantly see IEPs that have things in there that might have been appropriate years ago but that have just been re-included each year out of inertia, seemingly. So you should definitely read the old IEPs to see where the child has been, but I really don't know that it is a good idea to think of the old IEP as a starting point that just needs to be edited and updated.

    In my district, if the student has been in the district and is simply moving up to, say, 7th grade from 6th, we wouldn't do a new IEP until the old one was going to expire. If they did the annual ARD in 6th grade on, say, October 20, we might hold the new annual ARD sometime during the 1st half of October (but definitely before the 20th). Until then, I would be operating under the existing IEP that came with the student from 6th grade. If you notice that a student's existing IEP isn't working well for some reason, you could suggest that an IEP amendment be made (for a minor change) or request that the annual ARD be held early (more major change).

    With that in mind, when you write an IEP for a student, you want to bear in mind what grades that IEP will be in effect for. I work mainly with inclusion students who go to co-teach classes. So to return to the example of a 7th grader whose annual ARD is held in October -- when I write a new IEP for that student, I would include goals/objectives for November through May that focus on 7th grade content, but then also include an 8th grade objective that would be appropriate for September-October of the following year.

    Some of these details might work differently in different districts, but I think the general outline of this would be much the same across the country.
     
  11. LouiseB

    LouiseB Cohort

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    Jul 16, 2013

    I do the same thing as cat lover. I always look through the IEP and change whatever needs to be updated or eliminate other information. It is very helpful to know the student.
     
  12. Sam Aye M

    Sam Aye M Mr. Know-It-All

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    Jul 17, 2013

    If they are moving from one school to another (such as elementary to middle school) within the same district, transition IEPs should be held before the end of the school year BEFORE they move. In my experiences, most transition IEPs are pretty quick, as goals usually don't change, but often service minutes do change for various reasons. We also use the time to set up classes for the next school year, and address any concerns that the parent may have. Often, with students who have significant health concerns, the transition IEP is where we come up with a new health plan for the receiving school. The transition IEP does not take place of the annual IEP... those will happen at their usual annual dates.
     
  13. Lisabobisa

    Lisabobisa Comrade

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    Jul 17, 2013

    I usually have the old IEP and current ER in front of me when I write the new IEP. My colleagues copy/paste but I type it in and change things if necessary as I go.
     
  14. purpley

    purpley New Member

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    Jul 30, 2013

    Thank you for being so detailed and providing examples! You really helped clarify everything! I was wondering how I would write an IEP for a student I hadn't met before. This makes sense to me that the IEP from the previous year would be used until the annual case conference.


    Do you usually make all new goals/objectives for the students or do you generally keep some of them the same? Do most teachers include objectives that would be appropriate for the following year in the IEP?

    Thanks again!
     
  15. purpley

    purpley New Member

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    Jul 30, 2013



    Before you hold the annual conference, are you working off of the old IEP at the beginning of the year? The things that need to be changed (present levels of performance and goals) updated in the IEP before the annual conference?

    Thanks for your response! :)
     
  16. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Jul 30, 2013

    You would use notes from previous teachers. I know in my district, they would require my teachers to submit surveys yearly as to how my accommodations were, how I was in the classroom, my strengths and weaknesses, etc.

    You will change the goals yearly, because if the student doesn't meet a goal, you have to figure out why they didn't meet it and modify accordingly.

    Let's say the annual conference for Susie Q. was January 20th 2013.

    At that IEP meeting, they would make the goals, PLOP, the entire IEP at that meeting and the draft would be signed off on by the team.

    You work off of this IEP until the next meeting, as the IEP is in effect until January 19th, 2014, unless an IEP meeting is held before then.
     

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