Ideas why I can't get an interview?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Fleurdelis, Jan 13, 2020.

  1. Fleurdelis

    Fleurdelis Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2017
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 13, 2020

    I have a BA in Theatre and a MA and MFA in Theatre. I was licensed in Tennessee and now Virginia. I've taught High School and College. I've taught elementary school students at the theatre where I headed educational programs. I have a lot of teaching experience.

    I had two teaching interviews for jobs Virginia before I had my Virginia license. Now that i have my license, I can't even get an interview with a middle school for a drama teacher. Ideas on what's going on? I'm at a loss.
     
  2.  
  3. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2005
    Messages:
    4,059
    Likes Received:
    389

    Jan 13, 2020

    The only thing I can think of is this -- drama/theater jobs are incredibly hard to get and the competition is fierce.

    Is your experience in teaching theater in a public school, or is it experience "with" school age children? To those who choose who gets interviewed, there is a big difference. If it is actual certified teaching experience, and you have many years of experience. you may have too many years of experience, which makes you more expensive. If you have more than 5 years of certified teaching experience, you "cost" significantly more than a new-to-certified-teaching teacher.
     
  4. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2014
    Messages:
    10,194
    Likes Received:
    2,531

    Jan 13, 2020

    The Arts are the first casualties of budget cuts. Sad but true.
     
    readingrules12 and whizkid like this.
  5. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2007
    Messages:
    4,255
    Likes Received:
    1,220

    Jan 13, 2020

    The jobs are few and far between, unfortunately. The people who land those positions stay in them until they retire.
     
  6. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2008
    Messages:
    4,438
    Likes Received:
    1,074

    Jan 14, 2020 at 6:48 AM

    Any drama classes I've come across in high schools were taught by an english teacher so maybe they had dual certifications?
     
  7. tchr4vr

    tchr4vr Companion

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2015
    Messages:
    233
    Likes Received:
    140

    Jan 14, 2020 at 8:33 AM

    First, if you have only a theatre cert, it will be virtually impossible, unless you're going to a school that has a stand-alone theater program, which are few and far between. I'm also in VA, and every time a theatre position opens up, at least 50-60 people apply, if not more, for 1 job. For example, a new high school opened up here about 10 years ago, and 200 people applied for the one theatre position. They had the pick of every theatre director in the area. They picked the director from another high school who was state VHSL theatre champion ten years in a row. They wooed him with extra money and the like, just to get themselves the best of the best. Needless to say, that school is still the absolute top of the top, even right out the door. They've only missed state competition once in ten years, and that was because he was out for 4 months for an illness. They still went to regionals. If the school doesn't have a stand-alone program, you will be required to teach something else, usually English.

    It may also depend on what actual experience. As someone who has taught theatre in the public schools for 20 years, what is your actual theatre background? Most theatre teachers have to do it all - act, direct, design. At my last school, I designed and built all the sets, designed and taught lighting and sound, made costumes, directed, wrote music, performed--I did everything. I did have students in many positions, but I had to teach them the skills to be there. So while I eventually had a student as master electrician, I taught them how to hang and focus, rewire lights, color, program the board, cue sheets, all that. All I'm saying is that you may be qualified for one aspect, but if you can't do the tech side, or the performing side, you may be passed over for someone else.

    I have also found, at least here, that alumni get the jobs before experience, and some of that has to do with price. Last job I was clearly in the running for was given to alumni of the school, fresh out of college. They only lasted a year. When they came back to me, I had already taken another job and wasn't ready to leave yet.
     
  8. viola_x_wittrockiana

    viola_x_wittrockiana Comrade

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2016
    Messages:
    290
    Likes Received:
    141

    Jan 15, 2020 at 7:01 PM

    I second the comment about licensure areas. If you're only theatre endorsed, you'll likely only find part-time positions or won't find anything that doesn't require an ELA or other endorsement as well.

    The other thing it could be is that your experience is working against you. I don't know about where you are now, but in IL and apparently areas of OH it does. I found out from my counterparts at a district meeting that the schools here only want new teachers because they don't have to pay as much. Your years of experience and master's degree mean they have to fork over an appropriate salary, which may not be in the budget.
     
  9. Fleurdelis

    Fleurdelis Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2017
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 15, 2020 at 9:33 PM

    Thank you guys! These are all great insights. I really appreciate it.

    I am Pre-K-12 Theatre and English. I've acted, directed, vocal coached, and written tons of play for and by children. And I'm active in the theatre community, which the teacher leaving is not.

    This is the middle school my daughter will be attending, so It's just down the street. (Sigh)
     
  10. irishrose

    irishrose Rookie

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2014
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    22

    Jan 15, 2020 at 10:47 PM

    I'd say make friends with people who work at that school. Nope, nothing to do with the job. But. Can really help get you into the place you want to be at the right moment! Just be friendly to everyone every time you go up to the school, and look for common ground. Strike up convos and get to know people. Then let it slip if the time feels right that you have been looking for this type of job, or just a little here and there about your experience (a LITTLE! That part can quickly and easily be overdone! Unless of course they become interested and start asking Qs themselves....And/or you could try telling funny stories about the kids/families/schools/plays you've worked with (highlighting the fact that you've worked as a theater teacher, etc. but without the person really thinking about that in the foreground, just listening to an amusing story :) BUT.....like a TV ad, later on when there's an opportunity for you, their amusing acquaintance, you just might come to mind and get a valuable tip or recommendation! So many times, things like that have happened!
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. ally06,
  2. MrsC,
  3. rpan,
  4. vickilyn,
  5. futuremathsprof
Total: 314 (members: 6, guests: 288, robots: 20)
test