Ideas for 8th Grader just learning to read..?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by abrummitt, Aug 14, 2010.

  1. abrummitt

    abrummitt Rookie

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    Aug 14, 2010

    Hi All!

    I am a Title I Reading and Math teacher. This year I will have an 8th grader in my room who just began reading last year. I have an awful, cranky principal at my school who will not give me access to his IEP. I know that he has multiple disabilities, but I don't know what they are, and I don't have the training to diagnose him!

    It is so hard for struggling readers - I don't want to give him the "baby" stuff, but I'm not sure what else to do.

    Any ideas? For math I'm focusing on more "life skills" - telling time, counting money, etc.
     
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  3. newteacherkt

    newteacherkt Rookie

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    Aug 14, 2010

    I just went through new teacher training on EC students and I'm pretty sure that it is illegal for you to not have access to the info on his IEP. I would talk to the EC teacher at your school because if his modifications and other things aren't done for him, his parents could cause legal trouble for both you and the school.

    I suggest finding out what he's interested in and try to find material related to that. The more he enjoys reading, the more he will push himself to read everything. Make sure you provide a variety of print materials such as books, magazines, newspapers, etc. Hope that help!
     
  4. Mrs.DLC

    Mrs.DLC Comrade

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    You should be able to see the IEP. It should have goals. Look for high interest, low level vocabulary books. There are chapter books that are geared for older students that are at low readability levels.I also like environmental print that students may be familiar with. I used some of these when I taught HS special education. Good luck!
     
  5. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Violation of IDEA and/or FERPA
     
  6. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Aug 14, 2010

    Can you speak to last year's teacher??? Or his parents??

    Can you start with magazines? Sports Illustrated? Something having to do with gaming???

    I'm not a Harry Potter fan-- how is the reading level on them??

    How about a book that corresponds to a movie he would have seen? I'm thinking that he'll be able to compensate for the tougher vocabulary by already being familiar with the words???
     
  7. bros

    bros Phenom

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    The first Harry Potter has a lexile score of 880
     
  8. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    Aug 14, 2010

    Several years ago my parents had a foster child who was in the 7th grade and could not read...not eve CVC words...he was completely illiterate.

    Anyway, after getting through some of the "baby" stuff, he really enjoyed reading a particular series of science books. I'm not sure what the name of series is, but they all start "why does", or "how does", or "what is", and they talk about different science things, like "What is Lightning", or "What is a Tornado", and things like that.
     
  9. Geauxtee

    Geauxtee Comrade

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    Aug 14, 2010

    What about the Wimpy Kid series? It's actually really funny and has pictures. Maybe you could also bring in the newspaper comics everyday to read. Also, a lot of my slower readers like this series called "Bone."
     
  10. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Sorry, I'm not a Harry Potter fan.

    And I'm guessing my favorite, Gone With the Wind, probably isn't a top choice of 13 year old boys
     
  11. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

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    I'm stuck on the fact that your P is breaking the law by not providing you with the student's IEP. Does he give you a reason why you shouldn't have access to the IEP? Will you be the teacher of Record for this student? How will you ensure the student is provided with all the modifications he/she is entitled to without the IEP, esp. with multiple disabilities? Does your district have a SpEd coor or someone in charge of the Sped dept you could speak with in order to have access to the student's IEP?
     
  12. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    My grade 8 boys last year were really diverse in their reading choices, but I'm guessing that Gone With the Wind wouldn't have been among them. (Although, some did look up a summary after we finished reading The Outsiders).

    This has me confused and concerned as well. An IEP isn't a secret document; everyone who works with the student needs to be aware of everything that is in it.
     
  13. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    I'm also stuck on this part of your post. That IEP will have valuable information for you and, by law, you are to be given a copy if you teach the child. Can you go above the P's head to get the IEP? If you are not comfortable butting heads with the P, your next best bet is to contact other people who have taught the child.
     
  14. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Could it possibly be a matter of timing-- you can't have the IEP YET, until the school year starts??
     
  15. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Teacher's are allowed to access the IEP before the school year begins, so they are able to modify and adapt as necessary.

    I recommend that you go to the head of special education for the district and see if you can talk to them (if you can't, talk to the case manager of the student)
     
  16. teacher12345

    teacher12345 Cohort

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  17. WaterfallLady

    WaterfallLady Enthusiast

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    First of all, you have to see the IEP. It's the law. What are they trying to hide from you?

    Secondly, this is a series of books for teenagers reading around the 1st grade level. It's cool. http://www.sdlback.com/pc-96180-124-dark-man-sample-set.aspx

    Thirdly, go to Barnes and Noble if you can and look at the learn to read books. They have some that would work for older kids.
     
  18. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Thanks for that link, WaterfallLady--those books will be perfect for a couple of my students next year.

    Audio books are also a wonderful tool for your emergent readers.
     
  19. allisonbeth

    allisonbeth Comrade

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    Aug 16, 2010

    Some of my middle and high school students like the classroom magazine Scholastic Action. http://teacher.scholastic.com/products/classmags/action.html
    Some college (and even high school) databases give printable access to the magazine so you can see it and/or print it. Otherwise you can get a free sample copy at request.
     
  20. Bumble

    Bumble Groupie

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    Aug 16, 2010

    If you have the funds from your school, I would look into the SRA Corrective Reading program. You can give the child a diagnostic test and you use direct instruction to bring the student up to or in this case, close to grade level. I know a lot of non-failing schools use it in their learning support classes. We use it with all students who are below grade level. Also, the program is purposely scripted so that the students can better process language.
     

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