Ideas about homeschooling

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by katie11, Jun 16, 2011.

  1. katie11

    katie11 Rookie

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    Hi all, I am new to this forum community. According to me, homeschooling makes a child happy. He/she can learn in home in front of parents. They be out of stress and can learn properly. What is your opinion on this?
     
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  3. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    I think it can be done successfully-- there's a member here who has homeschooled her daughter for years and has worked incredibly hard to ensure that her daughter received a quality education.

    But, overall, I do have a number of issues with it:
    - It's easy to abuse a child and have no one notice.

    - It's easy to do little to nothing with no oversight.

    - It's easy to deny the kids quality interaction with his or her peers. And "not such quality" too. Kids, particularly kids without siblings, need to learn how to stand up for themselves and to negotiate the little ins and outs of dealing with other people.

    - Academically, not all parents have the best background themselves. You can't teach what you don't know.

    - Your oldest child gets a first year teacher every single year. When I get a new prep at school, that first year is never my best year teaching it. It takes at least a year (often a few years) to learn how the pieces all fit together. But your oldest homeschool child never gets a teacher who has taught that material before.
     
  4. msmullenjr

    msmullenjr Devotee

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    You always seem to sum up things so well, another reason to have a "like" button. Those are all of the concerns that I have with it, but I do realize that some parents do it very successfully and that is wonderful for them.
     
  5. Maryhf

    Maryhf Connoisseur

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    My SIL was very good at homeschooling her children. She pursued college courses for them as they got into higher level math classes. 1 son -definitely on the spectrum - did very well in college (on a scholarship) and has an excellent job; 1 son - ADHD- dropped out (would he have done better if professionals helped him develop strategies for coping?); and my niece hated college but got her degree. She had to rent a room from a family because she was not used to typical "misbehavior" from her peers in the dorm. I think she had been too insulated from others and never learned to have the confidence to make her own good decisions when faced with others' poor choices instead of being judgmental.
    In response to your original post, I've seen many students in traditional school who are quite "happy" and stress free. Some children no doubt benefit from a one on one educational setting.
     
  6. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    There is a careful balance that needs to be in place with homeschooling. And for some children and parent it is great, for others it would not work. It really depends on the relationship.
     
  7. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    1. Any child can will learn better when taught 1:1 than 30:1

    2. Any competent person can teach a subject in which they are knowledgeable to one student. Teaching that same subject to a class of 30 kids takes a highly skilled teacher.

    3. The children who are most likely to enjoy the benefits of homeschooling are the ones who are least likely to need it.
     
  8. TeacherApr

    TeacherApr Groupie

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    eek. Proper grammar would be the best thing first and foremost.
    A regular parent with no background of education (or taking ONE class) has no business homeschooling their child in my opinion.
     
  9. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    We had a topic about this awhile ago, so I just found the thread and copied my reply...
    I have pretty strong opinions of it, but I will admit that with the right kid and the right program it may be a good fit. I just don't happen to know of any situation where it turned out well. We had some good family friends growing up that homeschooled all of their kids. The mom really did it right, the students took advanced courses and they were part of a social group that did field trips on Fridays so they could interact with others. However, those kids still turned out extremely "sheltered". Although they were academically prepared for college, they totally flopped socially/emotionally. The one girl was upset for months because she missed a final exam due to being with a friend who was upset, and the professor would not let her make it up. She ended up dropping her major because of it. If she had any "real world" education experience, she would have known better- things are different when the teacher isn't your mom! The 2nd daughter ended up dropping out when she was locked out of her dorm one night (mind you this was at about 9 pm, and she was let in about 15 minutes later) and was so traumatized by the experience. The 3rd daughter basically couldn't handle the social/emotional pressures of living away from home (even though she was at an extremely small private college) and also dropped out. All 3 girls were extremely intelligent and should have done well- they just didn't have the "real world" experience to survive in higher education. I had a good friend freshman year of college who was homeschooled- again extremely bright but not ready for the "real world." She didn't go to class, didn't study, didn't do assignments. Her excuse was that all of her life she'd had someone right there making her do everything. She failed out before the first semester was even over. My mom works at a private school and often gets children who were previously homeschooled and she always complains that they are so far behind. Again, I'm sure there is someone somewhere that had a good experience with homeschooling. I could see certain situations, such as when the student is an extremely serious athlete, where homeschool would be the only option. However, most of the time I think it's a bad idea.

    I did a speech on the effects of homeschooling my freshman year of college. Interestingly, I literally could not find any data to support the fact that it negatively impacts students. The only thing I found was that there are 10 states that do not require any accountability at all (someone can simply say they are homeschooling and they don't have to provide any further proof or information, or say how they are qualified to do so). However, all the data found was based on academic achievement (standardized test scores, etc.) and did not focus on the social/emotional aspect of it. All three girls I described that I knew were homeschooled did very well on the ACT, but couldn't handle college because they weren't socially/emotionally prepared.
     
  10. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    To the best of my knowledge, I've taught 2 kids in the past 5 years who were homeschooled up until the year they entered our building.

    Martin was a disaster. He simply could not follow the rules-- he's still infamous with the kids in that grade (the upcoming Seniors) for taking out a PB&J in the middle of my math class-- apparently at home, if you're hungry you eat, even if it IS in the middle of math. He transferred out after 7th grade.

    Dan, on the other hand, is a shining success story. (Coincidentally, he'll also be a Senior in the fall.) His first classroom experience was his freshman year. Remember, there are over 2,500 kids in my school; it was quite a change from home. But Dan fit right in from day 1. He's middle of the pack in the Honors classes, made the Lacrosse team, and is just "bad" enough to be normal-- he's been known to get a detention, but they're rare and not for major things.
     
  11. Mr. Mortini

    Mr. Mortini Rookie

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    If the parent has the time
    and the required knowledge/resources,

    I believe that home schooling can be
    superior to public schooling.

    However, home schooling cannot
    provide the same socialization lessons
    that students learn in a public or private school.

    One way that parents committed to home schooling
    can supplement is by taking their children
    to after school programs (like at the Y and such).
     
  12. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Of course, it depends on the particular students and parents. That's obvious. It depends, too, on the students' learning styles. I am tutoring a home-schooled 6 year old 4 hours a week now. It works well because the mom does it the rest of the time and because the child is quite intelligent. He's doing first grade work and reading perhaps at a higher level though he would just have finished K if in school.

    One thing I notice is how many things I would like the student to be able to do in a small group, but we can't. We play games and have fun, but having peers would make it more fun. (He does attend several programs with friends during the week.)

    This child is very interested in the natural world and he gets a lot of time for raising butterflies, fishing, observing pond life, etc. That is great. He also is a bit active for a sit-down classroom and I wonder if he would face behavior issues in a traditional classroom. That would be unfortunate as those qualities don't hurt him when working one-on-one.

    On the other hand, if the parent teacher hasn't had experience in a classroom, they may tend to depend on workbooks. That's not enough, in my opinion, for a well-rounded education.

    Another factor is the state of the local schools and the social environment there.
     
  13. katie11

    katie11 Rookie

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    Jun 24, 2011


    Very true that one-on-one tutoring helps students in many ways than public school learning.
     
  14. katie11

    katie11 Rookie

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    Where comes the relationship in homeschooling? It is children who are going to learn and teachers will make students learn. Homeschooling comforts both parents and their children but it is totally not depend on relationship, according to me.
     
  15. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Have you home schooled?
     
  16. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    I've never done it. But I think ANY sort of teaching, especially where there are kids involved, depends very much on the relationship.

    And "comforting parents" is probably right up there with the worst reasons I've ever heard of to homeschool. There are lots of good reasons, but they should ALL be about what's in the best interest of the child.
     
  17. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Ditto.:thumb:
     
  18. Rabbitt

    Rabbitt Connoisseur

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    I have seen many homeschooling done well and just as many not so well.

    One thing I think homeschooling sometimes overlooks is preparing for the everyday work force such as deadlines, teamwork, working even with that headcold, collegue who is a slacker, scheduled breaks/lunches, etc.
     
  19. Lynn K.

    Lynn K. Habitué

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    I've seen both the good and the bad results.

    My sister's SIL has homeschooled all of her children, but when I asked why she said it was easier than getting them up in the morning. :( There is no obvious 'school space' and I have never seen those kids learning anything. IMO, a very bad example.

    On the other hand, I test adult students who are interested in getting their GED, and almost without exception, the 18 year olds who have been homeschooled their entire lives test ready to take the GED without further classes. (To compare, only about 20% of 18 year old high school drop outs are equipped to take the test; they invariably need class time with tutors.)
     
  20. teacherhoosier

    teacherhoosier Companion

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    I have mixed feelings about homeschooled. I believe that in some situations it can work, but in others, no way. My cousin's wife has homeschooled their kids for the last 10 years. They are in no way, shape, or form receiving the education they need. For one, they only do school for 3 hrs a day, and then the rest of their day is running around doing errands. Their daughter had a speech problem and they didn't get her any help (she seems to do ok now, though). Their youngest son has dyslexia, and according to his mom, has "grown out of it". Excuse me, but you never grow out of dsylexia..you can learn to cope with it better, but not grow out. I'm not sure how much education their oldest is even receiving because he works three jobs (at 17). I'm sure none of them could pass the state tests for their grade level. I love these kids (I was a flower girl in their mom and dad's wedding and I did a lot of things with them while they were growin up), but I don't think they've been given a fair chance in their education. I doubt any of them will go to college.

    They're the opposite of what another poster said..they are fine socially, but no way academically ready..
     
  21. gamerTeacher

    gamerTeacher Rookie

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    :dizzy:

    Learning is not about comfort, it is about gaining the skills and knowledge needed to succeed in life. The type of relationship between the parent and child influences how successful homeschooling is. For example, if the parent is overbearing and constantly does things for their child, the child will not learn. If the relationship is filled with tension, they will spend more time fighting than learning. If the relationship is too friendly, perhaps they will become easily distracted and not learn as much. The relationship sets the foundation for their interaction.

    Personally, I think that homeschooling is great when done correctly, but typically is detrimental to the child. It takes a lot of dedication, discipline, organization, education, and constancy to properly homeschool a child. It is a decision that should not be made because of comfort or any sort of separation anxiety.
     
  22. mrachelle87

    mrachelle87 Fanatic

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    I am not against homeschooling, but I am for tougher laws to monitor it. I went to the State Capital to discuss this with my representatives. I know that not all people who homeschool are like this, but here is a story that hit close to home.

    http://www.koco.com/news/28392516/detail.html
     
  23. old_School

    old_School Rookie

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    Someone once told me home schooling is better in most cases then public school. After talking to the person and hearing how his school went, it made me change my view and understand its a much better alterative to learning in most cases. However, it may not be for every parent in the world. something our best left to a pro sometimes.
     
  24. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    I think the jury is still out there.
     
  25. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    In what ways? In what cases?
    Surely there are great parents who do an awesome job HSing. A good friend of mine actually HS'd her son from grade 3 through high school. She did a wonderful job with her son who had trouble finding success in a traditional Ed setting as a kid. it was the right choice for them.
    However I'd be hesitant to make a blanket statement about 'most cases' though without knowing the specific parameters or seeing the research.

    Getting back to the mrachelle, though, yes, I agree that HS programs should be monitored. The particular case in the cited article was also a deficiency in the foster program. :(
     
  26. KatherineParr

    KatherineParr Comrade

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    My opinions on this are changing.

    I grew up in the deep, deep South. When I was a kid, the pervasive view of home schooling was that it was a way for religiously radical people (ie, way, way out there) to retain a cult-like control over their children.

    We had a very poor opinion of it, not just on academic grounds but as a matter of social policy. Schools are intended by the state to help raise functioning citizens. So part of the view at that time in that place was that home schooling allowed parents to opt out of the "socializing" schools offer. I don't mean playing with other kids. I mean teaching kids to be members of a democratic society.

    BUT, that was then. Home schooling is a much bigger, more diverse, more sophisticated movement now. And I have now lived in a lot of places outside of the weird bubble in which I grew up.

    So I guess I feel torn about it. I know kids who would benefit from a break. School is hard for them. On the other hand, I know a lot of really smart people and only a handful of them are broadly educated enough to offer what a school can offer in terms of the balance between literature and chemistry (for example). Add to that the facilities...
     
  27. msmullenjr

    msmullenjr Devotee

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    Agreed. Maybe its just me but that comment coming from a non teacher on a teacher forum... Just doesn't sit right.
     
  28. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    A lot of my students started off as homeschooled but wanted some professional instruction and a high school diploma while still learning from home. Once our guidance department figures out their transcripts, they usually make the transition to online learning easily, especially since their parents are very much in the picture.
     
  29. KatherineParr

    KatherineParr Comrade

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    catnfiddle, how do they handle labs? I've been curious about this for a while with your school, and with home schooled kids it's also something I'm curious about.
     
  30. mrachelle87

    mrachelle87 Fanatic

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    Actually the article was incorrect...they are not foster children. They are legally adopted and had moved to Oklahoma from their former state where the adoption happened--over 6 years ago. They were receiving $4,500 a month from the state they were adopted from because the children had been diagnosed with medical problems.
     
  31. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    From what students have told me, they do a lot of computer simulations as well as experiments the students can do at home. Honestly, as an English teacher, I'm not sure. I will check with one of my science teacher friends and find out (I wanted to quietly audit her physics class anyway).
     
  32. jonah

    jonah New Member

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    I'm thinking of homeschooling my daughter as well.
    This really might cause some udersocialization issues but still I think it's beneficial in so many cases. My girl likes peers but gets stressed in class so much, teachers can't handle it. Odd thing, she's totally sociable in the playground.
    So I'm thinking, what extra materials do you use?
     
  33. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    We are generally not Homeschool teachers on these forums. Check and see if there is a local homeschoolers group in your area. They would be helpful in choosing curriculum and in setting up social activities.
     
  34. Braves09

    Braves09 Rookie

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    Jonah, you may also want to look at some of the posts on homeschoolspot.com.
     
  35. katie11

    katie11 Rookie

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    Thank you people for your wonderful ideas.
     
  36. queenie

    queenie Groupie

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    While I agree with this statement, I think it's a GOOD thing!!

    It's for sure that wherever there's a homeschool discussion you'll find the topic of socialization in the mix. It's so strange to me- I guess it depends on what you view as "socialization." When I think of the word "social" or "socialize" I think of communicating with people= spending time with them for entertainment or friendship purposes. I never had a public school teacher who encouraged this. I always heard, "We are NOT here to socialize!" lol

    Another meaning for socialization as it is more likely intended in these conversations, I believe, is to get someone prepared for life by having them interact with others on a regular basis. Cause, you know, it's more like real life to be only with people your own age, to raise your hand and ask to go to the bathroom- and to go one at a time, and to line up in ABC order to go to lunch. Wow. I think socialization is MUCH more effective as a homeschooler- think about it. You get to spend time with old people when you visit your grandma at the high rise or when the mailman stops by to chat...you get to spend time with babies when your Aunt Gladys brings your baby cousins over...you get to actually count your change when you go to the Dollar Store with Mom...you get to learn life skills (laundry, cooking, paying bills)...you get to use the computer to find out information you NEED to know- the number of the local pizza joint, for example...and I don't know about you, but if a kid can learn to get along with a sibling (especially one they are with 24/7) that's a socialization miracle right there! :thumb:
     
  37. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    I hear that argument from homeschoolers all the time. The problem with it, however, is that it rarely works out that way. Rarely. Now, homeschooling parents always seem to think their children are "socialized' properly, but as a rule, IME, they seldom are.

    What happens instead, is the child learns ONE way to behave. And that is the way that Mom wants him to behave. No, he may not have to raise his hand to go the bathroom. Instead he learns that no matter what is going on at the time, his desires are what matter the most and he is well within his rights to stop in the middle of the lesson/worksheet and do something else. Which may or may not be acceptable in his job as an adult. I personally have never had a job where I could just stop in the middle of soemthing and go to the restroom.

    Also, many of these students do not learn how to interact with people of all ages and backgrounds. Usually when children are with homeschooling groups they are there with their mothers. They do not know how to act without Mom there to guide them. Moms tend to pick other HSing families that have the same background as they do. Very little diversity.

    Like a previous poster stated, I don't know why HSing families assume that public/private school children don't change diapers, count change or look up phone numbers. Are HSing students only doing that all day long? Is it not possible for someone to learn how to do that in less than 16 hours a day?
     
  38. jonah

    jonah New Member

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    Thanks for the advice czacza and braves09
     
  39. Pre-K Teacher 1

    Pre-K Teacher 1 Comrade

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    I would choose to homeschool over any other education option there is available. I've done it all: private school, religious school, public school and homeschool. Homeschool was the BEST option. My advice to you: Don't try to make your homeschool experience like "school" Look into "unschooling" when you get a chance.

    My child finished up high school in an alternative environment through the public school system which mirrored a lot of what I believe about education. In this environment, there were 6 teachers and aproximately 25 students enrolled. The beauty of the program was that the students worked at their own pace and pretty much made their own schedule. The teachers were there to support the students but the students were pretty much independent and able to progress at their own pace. They had to work on at least 2 classes a semester but could work on more if they wanted. It was self-paced. No bells, no lectures, no moving from space to space (unless you wanted to get up and move to another room!). If they finished the required high school classes early and were ready to graduate, they could. They offered graduation ceremonies 3 times per year, if you wanted to have the experience. It was not in a high school but in an off site location. Many public schools offer alternatives to the traditional classroom environment at the high school level. My school district offered, this option plus others such as, 2-day a week program at an off site location (students spend the rest of the week working on assignments at home), total computer-based learning at home, and night classes. In these programs, the students just need to complete the required course work for graduation, which means they can get done faster and get on with college and life! They were not restricted to adhering to the semester-based schedule.
     
  40. Rox

    Rox Cohort

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    I attended public school all my life and to this day, I still have social anxiety in many situations. I avoid many public events because I just don't want to have to socialize with people. All through college, I never had a roommate that I got along with. I don't think it's always the homeschooling that causes delayed social development. I'd be curious to find out if there is any research that compares the social development of homeschooled vs. public/privately-schooled students.
     
  41. katie11

    katie11 Rookie

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    I too think that homeschooling would be very good option. Plan a daily schedule and make her stick with it. So that your daughter will be engaged in studies. Also encourage some extra-curricular activities.
     

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