ICTS English Language Arts

Discussion in 'Single Subject Tests' started by swsmith63, May 27, 2006.

  1. swsmith63

    swsmith63 Rookie

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    May 27, 2006

    I don't know if this will help you, but I have been studying old English to mid-modern to present day English. Word origins and roots, especially Greek and Latin roots and suffixes. This has made my vocabulary stronger, helping me to ferret out exactly what is being asked of me in many test contexts. Hope this helps.
     
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  3. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    May 27, 2006

    swsmith63, that's a really good strategy. A reasonable knowledge of word roots often is very helpful in working out word origins, as well as bolstering one's vocabulary for interpreting literature and for writing essays. Were you studying the stages of the development of English as part of a class, or did you tackle that on your own for a teacher test, or what?

    And are you actually taking FTCE? I notice your location is listed as Illinois.
     
  4. swsmith63

    swsmith63 Rookie

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    I'm taking the Language Arts content exam in June. The study guide shows many of the questions aligning to Illinois Learning Standards. I am emmersing myself in Language Arts, vocabulary, anything and everything to get myself through the test. My certification is in Secondary Social Science: History, and Language Arts for Middle School, but I want to meet HQS for Secondary Language Arts.
     
  5. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    May 27, 2006

    Florida hasn't got a Language Arts exam that I know of, so this must be Illinois... let me see (insert here sound of hard drive being rummaged around on): ah, ICTS.

    Hmm....

    One thing you have to give NES credit for is study guides that, by and large, actually tell a person something.

    I see you're facing 125 multiple choice questions. The Californians will be jealous: they've only got 100 multiple choice questions, in two batches, but there are also two full-on analytical essays and four short answers. On the other hand, it's possible to take each chunk and spread it out over the five hours of testing time. Do you of Illinois get all five hours of testing time, or do they shoo you out at the end of the partial session?

    (And what is the adjective form of Illinois?)

    Some of the discussions under CSET English helpful. Do feel free to ask questions about anything in the ICTS study guide that isn't clear; chances are pretty good someone will have an answer. I'd suggest, though, launching them in a thread of their own if the system will allow you to.
     
  6. swsmith63

    swsmith63 Rookie

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    May 27, 2006

    We do get the full five hours. The study guide is somewhat helpful, but I am not sure from that the degree of questions comparable to the actual test.:eek:
     
  7. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    One of my sentences above should have read "Some of the discussions under CSET English should be helpful." Ouch.

    And I believe that you either pass the whole thing or don't pass the whole thing. Is that correct?

    I would expect the complexity of questions to be comparable to or less than that of the higher end of the spectrum on SAT II specialty exams, and almost certainly less than that of AP exams. Since your test is solely multiple choice, practice materials that are solely multiple choice should serve you well and might even overprepare you in Subareas II (writing) and IV (literature).

    Subareas I (teaching reading) and III (speaking and listening) aren't treated in SAT II, of course, but there's so much material on them that I suspect Illinois schools offer bachelor's programs in education with the requisite coursework. If you've had the courses, I trust you kept your books and old exams; study from them. If you haven't had the courses (perhaps because you majored in something else), go to the Web site of the best teacher's college that you can travel to and find out the course numbers that cover the content you're missing, then go to the bookstore armed with those course numbers and find the books for the courses and leaf through them. You might be able to score on some used copies at this time of year, or if you can discover the course book lists on the Internet, you might be able to rummage up used copies on Amazon or on my personal favorite, http://www.powells.com.

    Oh, and find someone else who's taking the test and study together!
     

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