Icebreakers

Discussion in 'Secondary Education Archives' started by joyoakes, Jul 6, 2006.

  1. joyoakes

    joyoakes Rookie

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    Jul 6, 2006

    I am a new teacher and I would love to make the first day sort of fun with a good icebreaker activity or two. I just don't know where to look to find anything cool to do.

    Thanks
    Joy
     
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  3. hernandoreading

    hernandoreading Comrade

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  4. montuckygirl

    montuckygirl Rookie

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    The Wilderdom website offers some great icebreakers, too. It offers Icebreakers, Warmups, Energizers, & Deinhibitizers. Sounds like an electronics store! Look under their Index to Group Activities, Games, Exercises & Initiatives.
     
  5. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    How much do your kids already know each other? I know that when I get my kids in 7th grade, they already know each other and don't really seem to like the "get to know you" activities. Now, our sixth grade teachers use them--although I don't know what kind--because they get kids from three schools.
     
  6. joyoakes

    joyoakes Rookie

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    What is that website?
     
  7. muinteoir

    muinteoir Companion

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    I don't do icebreakers. My kids know each other way to well already.

    I start out with procedures and do a quick observation lab to get them in the science frame of mind.

    Plus, it helps me teach lab procedures.
     
  8. montuckygirl

    montuckygirl Rookie

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    The website is www dot wilderdom dot com. It has activities for groups that know each other as well as those that don't. I have found in working with children, even if they "know" each other, you can really create a sense of community and safety by doing icebreakers and just process them at a deeper level. They learn to trutst each other more and they pick on each other less. They learn that they have more in common with their classmates. Many learn that they thought they were alone with a problem, but in reality many of their classmates struggle with the same issues. "Activities that teach" is a good book too. Find it at Amazon. A really good game that teaches respect and listening skills is "the ungame" You can google it and find the best price. It has variations for different ages and audiences.
    Ask a lot of open ended questions when processing the activities. How is this like real life? Would anyone volunteer how this activity made them feel? How many people felt they were leaders/followers?
    What kinds of obstacles did you face? How did you overcome those obstacles? How can this activity help you with your problems/issues? What would you do differently if you did it again? Etc.
    If our students don't learn social-emotional skills through effective ice-breakers and team activities, then what is the point in teaching? I know that is extreme, but don't we all know someone who is very smart, yet they lack pro-social behaviors. Like the crazy Math professor who can't take a bath or comb his hair at the university I attended!
     
  9. joyoakes

    joyoakes Rookie

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    Thank you so much for all your suggestions. I love that wegbsite and will use it this year. I agree the kids need to learn some social manners even if they know each other or not.

    Thanks
     
  10. montuckygirl

    montuckygirl Rookie

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    There is another one that is best when the kids have known each other for a while and it is called Warm Fuzzies. The students can decorate a small brown lunch sack with markers, put their names on it and tape it up around the room. Then they take pre-cut squares of colored paper and write "Warm Fuzzies" which are affirmations, compliments and nice things that they notice about their classmates, without signing their names. I encourage each student and teacher to write at least one per person. During the time the bags are up I encourage the students to record things they like about people and let them know in the form of a "warm fuzzy". At the end of the event or week the students can take the bag down and have a whole bag of "Warm fuzzies" to keep them feeling good when things go wrong. There is always some kid who resists this and writes nasty things, but I talk about that before, during and after the whole process. I tell them that if they find any nasties to publicly let the class know, without reading it outloud, tear it up and throw it away in front of everyone. Kind of a cathartic thing! I tell them it is like real life, keep those things that are uplifting and discard what isn't. It is good for the teachers to do a bag too, because it is really encouraging when the students say uplifting things anonymously.
     
  11. joyoakes

    joyoakes Rookie

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    Jul 8, 2006

    This is wonderful. I am teaching in a low income school and this will make thing so good for those that may need a picker up at the end of the week!!!

    Thanks for the great suggestion!!!
     

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