Ice should sink??

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by edu, Jan 10, 2014.

  1. edu

    edu Rookie

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    Jan 10, 2014

    Please help. Ice is more denser than water when temperature of water ≥9°C. Then why ice doesn't sink in water at these temperatures? Today I dropped an ice cube in water at room temperature and ice was floating.Is this a contradiction?
    Density chart: http://www2.volstate.edu/chem/1110/Density_of_Water.htm
     
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  3. bison

    bison Habitué

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  4. edu

    edu Rookie

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    Yes , ice is lighter only between 0 and 8.2 C. But at more than 8.2C ice is denser than water. I am specific about temperatures.
     
  5. ajr

    ajr Rookie

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    Jan 10, 2014

    What the heck are you talking about?

    The density of Ice Ih (the normal variety of ice that forms at 1 atmosphere when solidification occurs between -100 and 0 degrees Celsius) is .917 g/cm^3.

    At no point does the density of subcritical water drop below .999 g/cm^3.

    Edit:

    Turns out the density of water at 100 degrees is just under .960 g/cm^3, but I can't find a density diagram to tell you how much pressure the water would have to be under to get down to .917 g/cm^3.

    Edit 2:

    After a little more research, you'd have to bring the water up to just under 150 degrees C before ice would sink. This requires a pressure vessel under about 80 psi.
     
  6. lucybelle

    lucybelle Connoisseur

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    Jan 10, 2014

    Seriously? :dizzy::banghead:
     
  7. edu

    edu Rookie

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    Yes, you are right. I was looking at 0C ice, not 0C liquid water. They both are two different phases. Sorry for confusion. Thank you for your patience and help.
     
  8. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Jan 10, 2014

    Are you teaching science?
     
  9. i8myhomework

    i8myhomework Comrade

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    Jan 11, 2014

    [​IMG]
     
  10. JRafko

    JRafko Rookie

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    Jan 15, 2014

    I never knew ice was ever denser than liquid water, learn something every day!
     

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