IB Experiences

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by dizzykates, Jul 20, 2010.

  1. dizzykates

    dizzykates Habitué

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    Jul 20, 2010

    My school has been accepted to be an IB candidate school starting this fall. We are working on our thematic units this summer and I must say, it is rather overwhelming. There is specific vocabulary to use and it is changing the way we teach just about everything. In the long run, I think it will be a great change, but for now it is so much work!

    Has anyone else worked at an IB school or been part of the planning stages? I have a feeling I might need some support as we move into the school year and continue this process. I would love to hear other's experiences.
     
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  3. teachgrade5

    teachgrade5 Comrade

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    What is an IB school?
     
  4. trayums

    trayums Enthusiast

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    I taught music at an International Bacc. school for one year. It was the year that the school opened. Just take it bit by bit. there is no way that you can be expected to get it ALL "right" the first year. IB really focuses on character (pillars) etc. I remember the units being very overwhelming having to incorp. the district curric. and also applying IB priinciples as well. I say take it step by step!!!
     
  5. heymrsp

    heymrsp Rookie

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    My husband teaches in an IB school. He attended a week long intensive training in it last year out of state with several other teachers from his school. Our district paid a lot of money to have staff from IB come in to give all of us a two day overview last fall as we were looking at starting it in the elementary level. It was not met with good response based on multiple reasons. However, it continues to be very successful at the High School level here. I personally thought it would be a very daunting process to switch over to that style of teaching. Good luck!
     
  6. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    I have never experienced it as a teacher or student at the elementary level. We have it at the high school level in our district, though.

    How is it different from traditional elementary instruction? I am very curious. I feel like Googling it now.
     
  7. trayums

    trayums Enthusiast

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    Honestly- I don't think there is much difference. It really is just good teaching which is what we all do and strive for.

    http://www.ibo.org/pyp/
     
  8. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    From what I gathered in the past few minutes, they don't have traditional textbooks, and their curriculum is based off inquiry learning more than anything else.
     
  9. carlea

    carlea Comrade

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    I work at a K-8 school and right now only our middle school is IB (this will be our 4th year). It is a lot of work to start, but once you get all the unit plans done, you just need to tweak/update them each year. I've traveled to one workshop and took one online. I actually learned a LOT more with the online workshop (Triple A Learning). I don't know if I would be much help since my only experience is with MYP, but I'd be glad to participate in discussions!
     
  10. teacherheath

    teacherheath Companion

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    We went through the PYP (Primary Years Programme--the elementary program for IB) training and introductory stuff, including doing and teaching all planners, etc. We were just beginning the application phase when everything just started falling apart--funding for it, including everything else the state/district wanted us to do, etc. There were parts of it I really liked, but it was stressful at times because it was a lot of work.
     
  11. dizzykates

    dizzykates Habitué

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    What do you really like about it? I am finding the hardest thing is to set aside things I know have worked for me in favor of inquiry time.
     
  12. teacherheath

    teacherheath Companion

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    Well, it's a double edged sort of thing. Because we did have the planning time, we were able to go a little deeper into some things. However, there were a lot of meetings and that made things seem....fragmented....it was like we were always meeting it seemed like. And to be honest, part of the money that we got (grant, I think) came with money to buy cool stuff to support our units of inquiry. However, I was second grade at the time. I firmly believed that the basic skills of reading, writing, and math were foundational and that for any of the kids to benefit from the PYP stuff in the upper grades, they had to be strong at the basics, to free up their minds for the deeper thinking. So I kind of found it frustrating to spend so much time on the planners, etc. when it was really a small part of the day (the reading, writing and math stuff was all district mandated and had to be taught).
     

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