I was absent...what did I miss?

Discussion in 'Middle School / Junior High' started by eulasnopes, Feb 12, 2010.

  1. eulasnopes

    eulasnopes New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2010
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 12, 2010

    I am a new teacher. This questions sends chills up my spine. First, I feel like I should have something organized so that students do not have to ask me, but can go to a resource to access missed information themselves. Does anybody have a workable organization system for missed work and having it available to the kids?
    I do not want to use a white board.
    Help before I go crazy with "What did I miss?"
    Laura
     
  2.  
  3. Briana008

    Briana008 Companion

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2007
    Messages:
    202
    Likes Received:
    1

    Feb 12, 2010

    I have one side of my bulletin board dedicated to make-up work. I have a folder for every day of the week. At the end of the day, I type the date, essential question, standard being covered, bellringer, agenda, and make-up assignment for that class. It is all in a running word document and it takes less than 5 minutes to update it every afternoon for both of my preps. I print out the page for that day (however many as I had absent students). Then I look at the list of absent students and write the name of each student on the appropriate page and it goes up in that day's folder. If there was a worksheet, I staple it to the back. If we took notes, for the make up assignment I instruct the student to copy the notes from a classmate or the binder I keep of class notes. When the kid comes in the next day, it is HIS responsibility to get the work off the board (I teach HS). If he asks me, I just point to the board.

    I stumbled across this method a month or so into my first year teaching and it was a LIFESAVER!

    ~Briana~
     
  4. wrice

    wrice Habitué

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2009
    Messages:
    758
    Likes Received:
    1

    Feb 12, 2010

    At my school, we ask for a student volunteer to take assignments for classmates who are absent. That volunteer takes a clipboard and records assignments on a form as they change classes throughout the day, and collects worksheets and materials for that absent student. Those materials are then stapled together and either sent home (with a sibling of a sick student, for instance) or held until the kid returns.

    -Requires little from the teacher, and kids feel important to have helped. Delegate!
     
  5. SunnyGal

    SunnyGal Companion

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2009
    Messages:
    184
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 13, 2010

    Whenever I hand out something (worksheet, handout, etc), I set aside one for anyone who's absent, write their name on it, and stick it in a binder that is organized by class period. The binder stays on a table, and my kids know to look there if they've been absent. I also post weekly lesson plans on my classroom website, so they can look there as well.

    If I student asks me "Did I miss anything the other day when I was out?" a part of me always wants to say, "No, since you weren't here, we had to stop everything. Thank goodness you're back so that we can continue on!" I've never actually said that, but I've thought it!
     
  6. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    27,534
    Likes Received:
    6

    Feb 13, 2010

    My standard response is "Get the notes from someone and let me know if you need extra help."
     
  7. MrsTeacher2Be

    MrsTeacher2Be Companion

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2008
    Messages:
    208
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 13, 2010

    I have a binder for each course that I put assignments into with students name on or I put in a note if they have a test or quiz to make up. They know to get their stuff from the binder and copy notes from a classmate. On the rare occasion someone asks, "What did I miss?" I just point at the binder.
     
  8. kimrandy1

    kimrandy1 Enthusiast

    Joined:
    May 8, 2005
    Messages:
    2,181
    Likes Received:
    1

    Feb 13, 2010

    In our elementary school, one of the classrooms has a "job" that rotates. They call it attendance, but it really isn't about taking attendance. That child is responsible for collecting one of each worksheet, assignment, etc, for each absentee and putting it in a folder with the date on it. Kids who are absent check that upon return and take what they need.
     
  9. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2007
    Messages:
    3,506
    Likes Received:
    12

    Feb 13, 2010

    I have *this* posted in my room:

    Did I Miss Anything?
    by Tom Wayman
    From:The Astonishing Weight of the Dead. Vancouver: Polestar, 1994.

    Question frequently asked
    by students after missing a class

    Nothing. When we realized you weren't here
    we sat with our hands folded on our desks
    in silence, for the full two hours

    Everything. I gave an exam worth
    40 per cent of the grade for this term
    and assigned some reading due today
    on which I'm about to hand out a quiz
    worth 50 per cent

    Nothing. None of the content of this course
    has value or meaning
    Take as many days off as you like:
    any activities we undertake as a class
    I assure you will not matter either to you or me
    and are without purpose

    Everything. A few minutes after we began last time
    a shaft of light descended and an angel
    or other heavenly being appeared
    and revealed to us what each woman or man must do
    to attain divine wisdom in this life and
    the hereafter
    This is the last time the class will meet
    before we disperse to bring this good news to all people
    on earth

    Nothing. When you are not present
    how could something significant occur?

    Everything. Contained in this classroom
    is a microcosm of human existence
    assembled for you to query and examine and ponder
    This is not the only place such an opportunity has been
    gathered

    but it was one place

    And you weren't here
     
  10. Maryhf

    Maryhf Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2006
    Messages:
    1,598
    Likes Received:
    35

    Feb 14, 2010

    I hear the question "did you do anything yesterday?" to which I usually have a sharp reply. I have a form ready with blanks (HW collected, notes taken, lab completed, quiz taken, HW assigned, etc) and I ask for a volunteer to collect. They enjoy it and rarely miss items. That volunteer will usually share notes as well. Then I have a folder for each class to put it in.
     
  11. WaterfallLady

    WaterfallLady Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2006
    Messages:
    2,061
    Likes Received:
    2

    Mar 6, 2010

    Since I teach 6 different classes, I have a folder for each. When kids are absent, I write their names on the paper and put it in the folder with any extra instructions. Since I teach special ed., I think this is the best way for me to do it, because the kids can't always be responsible to get their assignments. It also works because we have a very low absenteeism rate at my school, and most of the time, I have no kids absent.
     
  12. CindyBlue

    CindyBlue Cohort

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2004
    Messages:
    505
    Likes Received:
    19

    Mar 11, 2010

    I have two students per period responsible for writing the homework and any other onfo (such as tests) on an assignment sheet that is posted on the wall, and to count how many students are absent and put one handout in the folder attached right under the assugnment sheet on the wall. For this the two student recorders get 20 bonus points - and since I rarely give bonus points, this is coveted. I use two students per period in case one is absent, and tell them to arrange the details begtween themselves - as long as it's done I don't care who did it. We switch at the quarter. I also tell the kids at the beginning of the year to get a couple of reliable homwork buddies to call. I've had no problems with kids asking me what we did when they were absent since I started this.
     
  13. chemteach55

    chemteach55 Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2007
    Messages:
    1,710
    Likes Received:
    13

    Mar 11, 2010

    Actually I am usually pretty sarcastic when this question is asked and tell them "You did not miss anything, we sat around and waited for you to come back." Especially if it is one of my frequent absentees.
     
  14. midwestteacher

    midwestteacher Cohort

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2008
    Messages:
    727
    Likes Received:
    0

    Mar 12, 2010

    I teach six different classes and I have three sets of 6 shelf stacking letter trays. Each set is labeled - one shelf for each class. One set is for students to turn in their work. One set if for copies of worksheets and notes that I have made. I am organizationally challenged and if I keep everything in the drawers, I know where it is. The last set is for make up work. When I am handing out worksheets, notes, or anything I make a note of the date on the top of the extras and put them in the correct place. When a student is absent, they know to go to the trays to look for make up work. I may also put a note on them about missed notes, etc that they will need to get from another student. They are in high school and it is their responsibility to get the make up work and make sure that it is done and turned in.
     
  15. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    27,534
    Likes Received:
    6

    Mar 12, 2010

    One of my freshmen was absent a week ago- Thursday, Friday, Monday.

    On Wednesday she showed up for extra help, empty handed. I asked whether she had gotten the notes, and she said she hadn't. I explained that I don't teach from a set of notes, so I had nothing to give her, she would have to find a classmate and get the notes. (By the way, she and some of her best friends in the class are in my study hall every day; kids leave study and go to the library where there's a Xerox she could have used.) She never got the notes, she didn't attend extra help, she let the matter drop.

    Yesterday in class I had to remind her to put her science homework away.

    Today was the test; they've had the date for months and I reminded them all week.

    Ten minutes into the test, she asked to speak to me in the hallway; I thought she was sick or something, so I went to the doorway (where I could still watch the class) and asked what was wrong.

    "Remember the other day, I tried to come to extra help...."

    OH, NO. Go back and take the test!!!

    She left it basically blank, scoring a 2%. (FYI: a 26 point problem was covered a week and a half ago, and another 26 point problem was done, ver batim, in class yesterday.)

    I guess she showed me!!
     
  16. chemteach55

    chemteach55 Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2007
    Messages:
    1,710
    Likes Received:
    13

    Mar 12, 2010

    I had a parent this year who got quite upset that I do not teach from written notes that the student could copy. I do use PowerPoint slides but most have one or two words just to keep me in order. I also put the word problems on the PowerPoint so that we can spend time solving problems instead of copying them. The students have to fill in the rest. My principal told the parent that he would much rather have a teacher who does not teach from written notes because it tells him that they know their subject matter. She was still quite mad.
     
  17. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    27,534
    Likes Received:
    6

    Mar 12, 2010

    I don't use Power Point. I have a title in my plan book: Investment Problems. And I have a list of undone investment problems.

    After 20+ years teaching, something would be drastically wrong if I DID need notes to teach math.
     
  18. chebrutta

    chebrutta Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2008
    Messages:
    2,489
    Likes Received:
    1

    Apr 1, 2010

    :lol: Alice!

    I keep a 3 ring binder with sections, updated daily.

    #1: Daily Info (essential question, class procedure, assignments, etc. Basically, my lesson plan printed out)
    #2: Vocabulary
    #3: Notes
    #4: Classwork handouts
    #5: Homework handouts

    I had to start putting names on all of the papers, since some of my more intrepid (desperate?) kids were taking extras out of the binder after they'd lost theirs.

    Works very nicely 90% of the time. Other 10%: parents demanding I hand the kid a folder and reteach my lecture during class... that's what after school tutoring is for!
     
  19. Kyro

    Kyro Rookie

    Joined:
    May 2, 2010
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 2, 2010

    In my class I have students seated in groups of up to 4 students. If one is absent it is the job of the group leader to collect work for the student and give it to them upon returning to campus. If the group leader is not there the next down the row gets the job.
    I even give each group a drawer to put items in so if they missed a worksheet - their copy will be in the drawer that their group leader got for them while they were gone.

    Keep in mind middle school students need a great deal of training on this. It took me about 12 weeks of prompting to start the year, but now that the year is almost over they almost have it down perfect!
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. dr.gator,
  2. komal
Total: 471 (members: 3, guests: 444, robots: 24)
test