I want to get out of the classroom, but stay in education working with kids.

Discussion in 'General Education' started by cutieturtle07, Aug 20, 2019.

  1. cutieturtle07

    cutieturtle07 Rookie

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    Aug 20, 2019

    Hello everyone,

    I'm currently a stay at home mom expecting child number two. I also teach with VIPKID. I was formally an elementary school teacher for 5 years. When I go back to working outside the home, I want to stay in education, but I don't want be a classroom teacher.

    Is there a certification I can obtain that will help with this transition? I don't really want to get a master's, but will if the payoff is worth it.

    I'm interested in working with kids in small groups or one on one. I'm also not interested in working as an administrator.

    Thank you so much!!
     
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  3. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    Aug 20, 2019

    What area, if you are okay with saying? This information will vary greatly by state.
     
  4. cutieturtle07

    cutieturtle07 Rookie

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    Aug 21, 2019

    Thanks for your reply! At this point it would be Texas or Florida.
     
  5. Michelle

    Michelle Rookie

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    Aug 21, 2019

    Possibly work as an assistant / paraprofessional ? Elementary level you would stay in one class - secondary level ( middle school and high school ) you would move from class to class depending on where the need for you would be.
     
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  6. cutieturtle07

    cutieturtle07 Rookie

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    Aug 22, 2019

    Thanks! I've definitely thought about it, but the salary is too low for those positions for me.
     
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  7. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    You could look into being an interventionist or a reading specialist.
     
  8. Tired Teacher

    Tired Teacher Devotee

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    Oh, if I had a do over..lol and you do! This is the job to get in a school!
    Our speech/language pathologist only sees kids 4 days a week and sees them 1 on 1. Sometimes she might see a small (3kids) group.
    She gets paid more than teachers who are working their butts off here. IMO, it is well worth it to get a MA if you are working in a school. You want to try to avoid debt as much as possible though.
    She has been able to have kids ( young now) and a lot more time and energy to spend with them. When I take my kids to specials, I walk by her room where she is sitting chatting w/ 1 student or alone, looking at her computer screen, I wish someone had told me about that job a long time ago! Good luck! :)
     
  9. OhioTeacher216

    OhioTeacher216 New Member

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    Sep 13, 2019

    I am a special education teacher, and while I love it and the kids, I am in the same boat as you! I recently went back for my teaching license in visual impairments. My goal is to get a job as an itinerant TVI job so I can work with the kids (which I love), yet not be in the classroom. The program was only a year and so worth it.
     
  10. JesusIsMyTeach

    JesusIsMyTeach Rookie

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    How do you get your license for this? Is it the same as a credential?
     
  11. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    I would love to be a reading interventionist and tried to get a job like that for several years. The problem is, so does everyone else. Those jobs are almost always filled internally by classroom teachers wanting to get out of the classroom. The first year, I only looked in the two "better" districts that were on my side of the city and would be an okay commute. Yes, it was only 2 districts, but between the 2 that was almost 100 schools. I'm also in an area with a fairly open job market for teachers. Literally 0 intervention postings. The next year, I decided to put out an application for our big city district (hundreds of schools) figuring it would be easier to get a position there. Saw maybe 3 postings and didn't get an interview.

    The third year, I tried again and this time there were only 2 postings. I did get an interview for one and I believe I would have gotten an offer if I'd been willing to do the program the way they wanted, BUT they wanted me to push in 50% of the time rather than doing small groups. I'd never heard of interventionists doing that and I LOATHE pushing in so no way was I going to sign up for that. I also asked if I'd be pulled to sub (under a previous admin, our interventionists were pulled to sub a minimum of 2 days per week) and the P was very wishy washy with that answer. So yeah, definitely not something I wanted to do.

    At that point I didn't see any way forward with it and I was getting too experienced/expensive to hire. I focused on proving myself as an interventionist at my current school, and while I'm still technically a sped teacher my entire day is teaching reading and math small groups (for kids with and without IEPs) as I've proven I can get results. P NEVER pulls me to do anything else- especially managing severe behaviors which is often an expectation in sped. Honestly I'm better off in my current position where I'm actually allowed to teach my groups all day vs. being somewhere as an interventionist where they don't let me do much.

    The long winded point I'm trying to make here is that a) I wouldn't set your sights on intervention as it's extremely hard to get into, and b) interventionists are often seen as low on the totem pole and used for subbing or doing tasks for admin.

    SLPs in my current district do have it really easy. For whatever reason they hire one per school even though they only see each student for 30 minutes per week- which results in a TON of free time. However, the other two districts I've been in haven't been like that at all. They had SLPs working in 3-5 schools and they had so many students that they never got planning time and sometimes not even lunch. At one point the one I worked with had over 90 students. The IEP paperwork alone for 90 students would be an insane amount of work. And I definitely wouldn't want to have to work at a different school every day of the week- that in itself would be a major challenge.
     
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  12. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    If you are in Florida, you have to have both your ESL endorsement and a Reading Specialist endorsement for elementary -- just to start. You may already have both of those, so then that wouldn't be a problem.
     
  13. runsw/scissors

    runsw/scissors Phenom

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    Consider becoming an ESL teacher. This year I work with students at all grade levels K-5, about 28 in all. There is another ESL teacher in my building so I have someone to discuss students with and bounce ideas off of. The kids in this population are generally better behaved/more respectful of teachers because of the cultures they come from, especially if they are immigrants. I love being an ESL teacher and hope I never go back to the regular classroom. The endorsement wasn't hard to achieve, but it did require some graduate work.
     
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  14. whizkid

    whizkid Habitué

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    Might want to try Physical Education.
     
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  15. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    I got lucky and I received a split position this year where I teach 6th grade math and I run intervention groups in the afternoon. Overall, I love it! It is nice to work with small groups of students.
     
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  16. nraleigh

    nraleigh New Member

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    Jan 9, 2020

    I know how you feel. I've been working with children for 30+ years (private schools, home day care when my kids were preschool ages, public school) and have 9 years more until I can leave with full retirement. The stress level can be so high in our profession. My husband would really like me to find a different job, but our skill set doesn't easily transfer...I've considered becoming a reading teacher, but my district has moved to reading coaches instead who work with teachers rather than students. I like teachers, but I LOVE working with children. Becoming a TA has been discussed and my hubby is working on ways we can live on less than half the salary I'm currently making, but honestly, working as a TA means giving up some of my favorite parts of teaching. Crazy as it may be, I love lesson planning and making the decisions that will impact student lives. A TA job doesn't have all the stress and the seemingly non-stop work load, but it also doesn't have the same level of creativity.
     
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  17. OhioTeacher216

    OhioTeacher216 New Member

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    Sorry for the late response-- I do not get on as much as I would like to.

    This is an additional teaching licensure area. I REALLY enjoyed the program!

    I already have my special ed. teaching license and reading endorsement, which quite a few people in my cohort did not have so they had additional hurdles to jump over. My program was online and we met 1x a month as a cohort near the college. For those who did not have their special education license or reading endorsement, they had to take the OAE (Ohio Assessment for Educator-- similar to the Praxis) for special education, reading endorsement (which involved additional courses), and the visual impaired test for to add this licensure to their license.

    The program was one year with an internship that was able to be completed during the summer. The tedious part of the program was learning braille-- and since it was an online program, I pretty much had to self-teach myself braille. However, the professor was very accommodating with any questions, and us in the cohort spoke almost daily regarding the rules of braille, etc.

    When I worked with this low-incidence population, it was quite a different experience in teaching than what I have encountered over the past few years. I am really looking forward to eventually working with this population.

    Feel free to ask anymore questions :) I am a huge proponent for working and advocating for students with visual impairments.
     
  18. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    You probably won't get any type of specialist position if you don't have the experience or certification. If you only have elementary certification you will probably have to go back to get something else but not necessarily your masters although that is always the best idea in my book considering some states require you to get it within a certain amount of time. Everyone and their mother wants to "work in education but not in the classroom" and if they have the experience they will get those specialized small group positions instead of you.
     
  19. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    There is a huge teacher shortage in Florida, but be forewarned -- the pay for a certified teacher is ridiculously low here (thus the reason for the huge shortages.) When I moved to Florida last year, with 18 years experience, a master's degree, and being fully certified, the going rate was around $48,000 per year for a classroom teacher (and that did require a lot of extra meetings after hours each week -- mandatory, no exceptions.)

    Also, here, to get a job as a specialist, it was required that you work in that specific school district for at least 3-5 years as a classroom teacher. Those jobs were incredibly competitive. Most candidates have at least a master's degree and 10+ years of experience.

    In Florida right now, new state regulations mean you also have to be certified in ESOL and a Reading Specialist to be a teacher, and while most districts will pay for you to obtain this, you are the one stuck taking your own time to complete the 5 courses for ESOL and the 5 courses for Reading Specialist, and you have to do it within your certification period (5 years.) You may already have these certifications, so it may not be a problem, but if not, are you really willing to take 10 graduate classes in the next 5 years to stay certified?

    I don't know anything about the requirements in Texas. Maybe someone from there can chime in and help out.
     
  20. whizkid

    whizkid Habitué

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    You'd be over $55,000 in Louisiana.
     

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