I still need some help on finding a career path!

Discussion in 'General Education' started by yosoysinistar, Aug 7, 2015.

  1. yosoysinistar

    yosoysinistar New Member

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    Aug 7, 2015

    After having finished my elementary education program with my university I found out that I am not meant to become a teacher. [I REALLY HOPE THAT THIS WON'T OFFEND ANY TEACHERS :hugs:] I absolutely hated having to stand in front of the classroom, and teach children to take a test that I knew they could not pass. I felt that it turned me into somebody that I'm not. I hated that it didn't allow me to be energetic, and I always had to be completely strict with the children just to effectively manage the classroom. It was frustrating being constantly watched, and critiqued on things that were completely out of my control. It's like any attempts at fun would die within seconds. I hated that I didn't have a life outside of the classroom due to the constant preparation of lesson plans. Most of the people that I worked with were incredibly jaded about working with kids, and I could not believe the sheer amount of office politics. I realize that not every single school is like this, but the bad luck that I have had the past few years has turned me off the profession. I found teaching to be a stressful career that I'm glad that I do not want to pursue.

    I spent the past few months thinking about other careers that I could possibly pursue, and I found out more about my personality. I cannot imagine being in a job that doesn't allow me to work with children, or helping the less fortunate. I realize that it's cheesy to say that being a positive male role model really gave me a sense of purpose, but it did. It's like everything that I said or did was completely awesome to them. I honestly loved aspects of working with them one-on-one or in small groups. I loved the aspect of mentoring the older kids to behave with others, and I loved being there for them whenever they had a problem that they needed help with. I'm definitely geared more towards the social side of working rather than actual teaching.

    The problem is that I'm struggling to figure out a career path. I like jobs that give me meaning. I don't necessarily know what I could possibly do, or what I would be able to go back to get my masters in. I have thought about many things such as working as an After School Counselor or as a Tutor. My only problem with tutor is that I excel at some subjects, but I am not effective in the ones most students need help with (Math). I could possibly be looking at a job with a nonprofit company next year. It allows me to tutor young children and help them build literacy skills. It sounds absolutely amazing, and I think what I learned during my teacher prep classes will come in handy. However, stability and salary is a big concern for me. I have no intentions of becoming rich, but at the same time I want to make enough money to survive. Hell, even a paycheck above 1,600 would actually be enough for me to survive due to parental assistance.

    If someone could possibly help I would really appreciate it!
     
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  3. DrgnJones

    DrgnJones Rookie

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    Aug 7, 2015

    Have you looked into a career in social work?
     
  4. SCTeacher23

    SCTeacher23 Comrade

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    Aug 7, 2015

    Have you actually taught before or is this experience based on student teaching? I'm not trying to convince you to stick with teaching - however, I quit teaching after my first year. I thought I didn't want to teach, but I realized I was just in a really awful school. I took a job outside of teaching for a year, and realized I missed it, and went back.

    However, if you don't want to teach there are tons of jobs out there that just require a "bachelor's degree" and it doesn't matter what it is in.
     
  5. applecore

    applecore Devotee

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    Aug 7, 2015

    Perhaps you can talk to your university's adviser and ask them what direction you can possibly go with a four year degree in elementary education.

    There's a lot of social service types of careers out there. Or, maybe if elementary is just not your thing but you're still wanting to teach a speciality, consider adding a masters degree to teach at college level.

    I'm teaching now while working on my master's degree in reading. I had ideas of becoming a reading specialist and then teach remedial or general reading or writing at the college level; I'm still deciding as I finish my masters.

    Best wishes!
     
  6. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    Aug 7, 2015

    I've known a few people in your situation who have taken their skills and pursued being a paralegal. It requires some additional training, but it's not an entirely new degree.
     
  7. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    Aug 7, 2015

    Based on your description, have you considered trying early (K-2) elementary? You'd still have the general teaching stress, but not really the testing stress. There are also still schools which aren't so test-crazy. You could also look for a school that departmentalizes, and focus on science/social studies.
     
  8. Geauxtee

    Geauxtee Comrade

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    Aug 7, 2015

    Have you thought about teaching private school? Yes, the pay is lower but there is a lot less test anxiety and classes are usually smaller.

    I would also look into teaching a lower grade without testing. I think male teachers in the lower grades are needed.

    Pre-K is a fun grade because it not insanely rigorous and there is a lot of playtime and kids being kids.
     
  9. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Aug 8, 2015

    I was also going to suggest social work and trying another school.
     
  10. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Aug 8, 2015

    yosoysinistar, I know how you feel. I've also had a rocky road w/ my career path. I never wanted to be a teacher, but wanted a career working w/ kids. Immediately, after getting my BA in behavioral sci, I became a substitute teacher & seemed to kind of like RSP, which is a type of mild/moderate special ed teacher working w/ kids in lang arts & math. I liked the fact that the kids were pulled out of their gen ed class & I only had to work w/ a different, small grp for 30-60 min. I never wanted to have the same big class all day long.

    Eventually, the district I subbed for partnered w/ a univ to have a dual credial program, which I did & so I earned a mild/mod special ed cred & a mult subj cred. I even earned a MA in special ed, was hired as an RSP teacher the summer I graduated. I liked it so-so. I just taught that 1 yr, but had always been interested in speech pathology, so went back to school for that, since a grad degree's a must for that field, while still subbing too. I earned my SLP-A license (speech lang. pathology asst.) & then worked as a speech pathology (w/ the full salary) for 3 yrs while in school for it & having fellow SLPs helping me along.

    Nowadays, I'm working non-education related jobs & at the tail end, trying to completely pass my final, huge exam to graduate w/ my MS degree. There's still another exam after that to pass as well, plus do what's called the CFY...another year of working, but still a bit under another SLP's guidance.

    Honestly, I'm so burned out from going to school, I don't even want to do the career I've been in school for these 3 yrs. Hopefully, I'll have a new found passion when I've actually graduated.

    I hope you find something you truly enjoy & have a passion for!
     
  11. lilia123

    lilia123 Companion

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    Aug 8, 2015

    After my student teaching I felt a lot like you do and did not want to become a teacher. I did get a job in the fall anyway and had a very rough first year. After that I really didn't want to teach. I also had no idea what else to do with my degree. I did come back the next year and then moved to another state a few years later. I'm now in my seventh year and really do enjoy my job. I realized after a while that individual school environments can make you love or hate your job. Also, things do become easier over time. In the beginning I spent hours every night doing school work. I now only stay about 30-45min after the kids leave and do very little work at home. At the end it's your decision I just wanted to share with you my experience.
     
  12. bewlove

    bewlove Companion

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    Aug 8, 2015

    I was also going to suggest social work. All of the kiddos involved with social work are desperately in need of strong adults, any strong adult, anywhere. Someone to help guide them through the situations they've been in.

    Sounds like a perfect fit.
     
  13. yosoysinistar

    yosoysinistar New Member

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    Aug 8, 2015

    Hello everyone!

    First off, thank you all for the responses!

    I think that most of my negative experience largely stemmed from the fact that I had a history of horrible mentor teachers. My college professors, and some of my colleagues were amazing since they constantly stressed how they needed more men in the profession. However, my mentor teacher during student teaching was...abysmal. As time goes on, I almost got the feeling that she just didn't like men. She would constantly complain about how the classroom management being so bad due to the amount of boys in the room. My supervisor was completely useless, and I feel that she never really cared about any concerns. As a result, I couldn't take the stress and quit student teaching right near the end. I managed to get my degree, but my biggest hindrance is not being certified.

    To everyone else, I actually thought about working with the younger grades. I liked that there was absolutely no testing, beyond trying to help build literacy. I also found it far more easier to go home and not have work follow me home. I have always considered about becoming a teacher's assistant. I just think the entire student teaching experience of constantly being put on the spot, and involved with office politics might have been the reason I'm so pessimistic about working in a school.

    I am constantly seeing people mention the idea of going into Social Work. Can anyone tell me more information about it? I have always heard horror stories about people becoming burned out, and constantly being stressed.
     
  14. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    Aug 8, 2015

    I can't imagine being in school for such a long time and not feeling passionate about my chosen career path. Do you even enjoy working with children or are you having second thoughts about being in education?
     
  15. renard

    renard Companion

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    Aug 8, 2015

    I'm a teacher working as a teacher's assistant/para whatever you call it (I'm in Canada, we use other terms).

    I *love* it. It has the pros of teaching without the cons (except pay, of course). I find regular teaching too much stress at this point in life (one of my children is disabled and requires extensive care).

    Maybe try that for a bit?

    I actually came from a social work background. I got tired of the paperwork and hours (my sector was 24/7/365). Something to consider. If you don't like testing and bureaucratic decisions out of your ability to change, social work is often worse than teaching, IMO. Just FYI. It's still a good profession.
     
  16. oldstudent

    oldstudent Comrade

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    Aug 8, 2015

    Based on what I have observed in my 18 years as a sub, I would have gotten a degree in Communicative disorders and become a speech therapist if I could go back in time 40 years.

    There is more to the job than what can be seen from the surface, but the speech therapists generally work with about one to five students at a time playing therapeutic games in a non-stressful environment.

    I am sure they have lots of paper work, and are not completely immuned from the politics of education, but from what I have observed when speech therapists visit special ed classes, this is the route I would have taken.

    I always see district openings for speech therapists as well.

    It is not practical today as I am pushing 60.
     
  17. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Aug 8, 2015

    Yeah, to mk as brief as possible, this is my 2nd grad degree I'm working on. I should have graduated this summer, 2015, but still have to retake certain parts of my final exam, so it's a retake this fall. But, I've been tired of college in general for about the last yr of the rigorous 3-yr program. Already worked as an SLP w/ full salary for 3 yrs...last yr was at this horrible-admin school & it was somewhat unsafe/scary too!

    I've been blessed not have to work anything education-related nor commute since March, 2014 while I finish up studying, etc...didn't mean it the way it sounds...just mean able to focus.

    Yes, I always wanted a career w/ kids, but it was pediatrician, maybe child psch. I considered being a child life specialist long ago & got accepted to grad school, but decided not to go that route. Will I one day be commuting to a district again for work? Probably.
     

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