I should NOT be feeling like this

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by texashistory, Aug 31, 2014.

  1. texashistory

    texashistory Rookie

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    Aug 31, 2014

    I've just been through a profound reality check and am coming to terms with it all and realizing that special education on a public school level is not for me.

    I know it's been 1 week but honest to God it was awful. I knew it would be tough but as a first time teacher in a classroom I was not prepared for special education.

    Now I need to be CPI certified and I specifically did not apply to positions that mentioned CPI because that was not what I wanted anymore.

    I'm honestly ready to quit or pray for a reassignment. But my biggest fear is if I stick it out until May I'm STUCK literally in special education and that I'll have to leave teaching forever.

    It's not for everyone I know BUT I know and feel it is for me but special ed is not and I fear I'll get no response unless it's special ed. I have paras looking to me for direction. Quoting my P "I'm chief in my classroom" but I don't know what the F to do. I DON'T know the curriculum. I was hired days before school started and this week was just chaotic....beyond chaotic.

    I feel like I want to find a shrink to declare me having a nervous breakdown so I have a legitimate health reason to get out of my contract. I was crying for hard for an hour today in a daze I didn't realize I was scratching deep welts into my arms but the pain was like a calming balm to what I was feeling and when I realized it I just kept going and now I have pretty bright red marks up and down my forearms. Causing physical pain to myself is my only release from crying and NOT wanting to go back?????

    I'm hyperventilating and literally pulling my hair because the pain feels good and helps when I think about it and look at the work I brought home for the 3-day weekend.

    All 1st year teachers struggle but is this normal for special ed? First time in a classroom but still. As a person of deep faith I'm struggling like I never have before and I just want to get in my car and drive where no one can find me and make me go back on Tuesday.
     
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  3. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    Aug 31, 2014

    Is there someone at your school who can serve as a mentor to you? The first year is stressful. You don't have to master everything right away. What are the top two things you would like to improve next week?
     
  4. AlexaD

    AlexaD Companion

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    Aug 31, 2014

    I second the finding a mentor who can help you. You don't have to do this alone. Yes, the first year is stressful, but you have to take it one day at a time. Think about it this way: they hired you for a reason. They feel you are the best person for the job. You may not feel like it right now, but you can do this. Take a deep breath and remind yourself that you don't have to be perfect. It's okay to need help. Are your paras helpful? Talk to your principal if there is not a mentor so he can get one ASAP. No first year teacher should go through it alone, especially in special education.
     
  5. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Aug 31, 2014

    Do you have a history of self-harm?

    Teaching can be challenging even for the most experienced teachers. The first week of the first year is among the most challenging times that any teacher will ever experience. Even so, most teachers don't resort to self-harm when feeling stressed. That seems like a very extreme and unproductive reaction. I encourage you to seek help from a mental health provider.
     
  6. wldywall

    wldywall Connoisseur

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    Aug 31, 2014

    CPI certification can be just an insurance policy for the school, and not a reflection of what they expect the students in your classes to be like. Find a mentor and get some support, especially for the curriculum issues
     
  7. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Aug 31, 2014

    The beginning of the year is always the hardest as you are forming the classroom community and teaching expectations and procedures. I have a tough group this year and am going through a lot of emotions, but this is my 6th year so I have some experience to pull from. I can only imagine what you are going through as a sped teacher and your first year. Hugs to you. Just remember your health has to be your top priority. Do you have a TA or anyone else in there with you? I also agree about getting a mentor.
     
  8. texashistory

    texashistory Rookie

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    Aug 31, 2014

    No I have no history of self harm but other than literally screaming and destroying every piece of furniture and property in the vicinity to get some rage and sadness out it's what I did.

    I'm suppose to have a mentor but he/she has been nowhere. I have NO time to do one thing at a time. They have to get a bit of everything done.

    It's SPED and state wise IMO you have to be perfect. Data collection, IEPs, benchmarks, etc there's no room for mistakes and stumbles. I have paras looking to be for direction, breathing down my neck for a schedule so they know what to do. I don't even know what to do. The paperwork doesn't even scare me like it does so many in SPED it's the lack of time. There's too many children and no enough time in the day 8-2:45 really to get all this crap done. WHY I thought I could do magic and be a circus juggler and just balance it all I have no idea.

    I don't know the specifics of the ramifications but at this point I don't care how many people come into that room with me. Bot curriculum coordinators, my AP the P. I do NOT want to go back there. They saw something in me that made them choose me and maybe I CAN do the job but as of August 31, 2014 that's a job I CANNOT DO right now. Maybe August 31, 2016. 2017, 2020 I don't know but right now no.

    I'd hate disappointing myself, my family, the admin, everyone but my first time ever teaching I made a HUGE mistake doing Sped first and I truly believe that. I really do. I've prayed on it and cried on it, screamed out for help on it and I know it was a mistake. I don't know what to do now but I don't feel I can stick it out. If I do I might get stuck in it and have to leave the district to get a GenEd position (what my predecessor had happen....it's a great district...so why else would she run to another one?)

    My guess she tried and the district as a whole wanted to keep her boxed into Sped. I'm done with education if I can't move around. That was my plan anyone to move around to find what fits me but I fear that won't be an option if I stick it out until May. I'll apply and get people asking if I'm interested in a SPED position. At this point, no. Maybe after I've actually managed a classroom and more than 2 children at a time in some 5+ years but right now no. Absolutely not.
     
  9. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Aug 31, 2014

    Does that mean that you've decided to resign? Will you be giving notice?
     
  10. AdamnJakesMommy

    AdamnJakesMommy Habitué

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    Aug 31, 2014

    First, I know lots of SPED teachers who move into general ed., so it is more than possible for that to happen to you. What will be enormously difficult to overcome is a bad reference from the only principal you have ever had, and I would not recommend going in there and alerting them to the fact you are on the verge of a mental breakdown.

    I'm in a similar position as you, regretting the job decision I made. I had two choices, and I feel I picked the wrong one: class sizes are huge, very little technology (no smart boards, no laptop carts), and I haven't even heard from my mentor---the other district my mentor would've been on the same hall, this district has a floating district wide mentor...

    The first year is very hard, so is the second from what I hear. Eventually, things will be pleasant and not nearly as stressful. Before you do anything rash career-wise, is there anyway you can see your doctor and perhaps get on some sort of medication to help you deal with the stress better?? I know many SPED teachers who have to put in way more than the typical school day, especially at the beginning of the year and end of the year.

    If I were you, I would see my doctor and get on something to help with the stress. I would not resign unless I had a general ed position offered to me--but I'd definitely be looking!
     
  11. Proud2BATeacher

    Proud2BATeacher Phenom

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    Aug 31, 2014

    I cried for the first 4 months when I taught my first sp. ed. class (autism). I got over it and stayed with that class for a total of 3 years. I only left because I moved but that class is now the standard that I hold my other jobs up to.

    I had a mentor at my school who did nothing for me as she answered most of my questions with "I don't know" as we worked in 2 different programs. I contacted the person in the county who was in charge of the autism programs and she found me 2 mentors from other schools who were also teaching programs for students with autism. They helped me regain my sanity.
     
  12. lilia123

    lilia123 Companion

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    Sep 1, 2014

    It isn't just you. At my first SPED job I had panic attacks nightly about going back to school the next day for several months. After a while though I did get into a pattern and routine because of this my stress level went down dramatically. What kind of program do you teach? Are you Elementary or High School? A lot of people here can also give you ideas about scheduling, organizing your classroom, and working with paras. The key to special education is finding a consistent routine and being very organized. I'm currently beginning my 6th year teaching. I am in a new state after taking some time off with my child. I am right now going through a time of being very stressed about time management, ironing out schedules, and learning new paperwork. It will get better, it just takes time. I started doing hot yoga to relieve my stress and it works amazing if that's something you are interested in. Also, a lot of counselors can give you ways of reducing your stress through breathing and mental exercises. Don't give up yet lots of teachers feel stressed and disillusioned their first few months of school, but it does get better.
     
  13. teachsph2008

    teachsph2008 Companion

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    Sep 1, 2014

    I'm also in Texas and I used to feel like you did. And I agree, with sped they expect you be perfect. No one wants TEA breathing down their necks.

    With that said, I have noticed that in the beginning of the year EVERYONE is busy, janitors, admin, paras, teachers..you name it, busy busy busy. What that means, they really don't have time to check on every single thing. I'm not saying you shouldn't do what is expected of you, but I think they really understand that you are busy and it will take awhile to get everything in place. Last year we were given 4-6 weeks to have everything up and running.

    I've already had walk-thrus, but that's all it was. Just them popping in to document a visit.

    I like to make a weekly list of all things that I want to accomplish. I then go and number them in order of importance. I also give myself permission to adjust the list as things arise.

    As far as paras go, I really don't blame them. Something tells me that they are unsure of you and want to please you. They are not sure what to do. How about being honest with them? I would not say that you are thinking about quitting or anything like that, but just say you won't have a set schedule until 1-2 weeks. Maybe you can even ask them for ideas?

    And finally, like most have said, although you are feeling horrible now, this is kind of the norm in the beginning of the year. Things will get better. And remember, you don't have to be perfect. Just do the best with what you have.
     
  14. ca_sped

    ca_sped Rookie

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    Sep 1, 2014

    Last year was my first year as a teacher and I had panic attacks on the freeway into work for the first two months, if not longer. It took me a good month to finally get through all the IEP's, simply because of meetings after school and the billion other things that take up our time. I was also an intern, so I had my university supervisor and a district mentor in my room during both of my prep periods for the first six weeks. I was convinced I had made a HUGE mistake, that I wasn't cut out for special ed, and that I'd never make it through the year.

    Somewhere around December it finally evened out, and I am teaching in the same room this year, and I love my job.

    Pick one or two things to do right now...go through IEP's and set a schedule for your week and for your paras. Tell them you need some time to get to know the kids and the IEP's so you might be making some changes later on, but for now, they need to work with these kids on this (even if it's not an IEP goal), and then once you have everything in place you can move into IEP goals, one kid at a time as you get through the actual IEP's and goals.

    The self-harm is worrying, perhaps you can ask a doctor for some anxiety medications to help you get through the day.
     
  15. ecteach

    ecteach Devotee

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    Sep 3, 2014

    This is my 8th year in self-contained, and today I almost walked out and applied at McDonald's. This was one of the craziest days I've ever had. I gave up after 12:00. They had free time. Was that productive? Nope. Should I have done that? Absolutely not! I literally could not take any more.

    All 8 of my students are in diapers, and each one had a bowel movement at least 2 times today. What else can you get done when you are dealing with that? I have two T.A.'s. One is beyond awesome. The other one uses any chance she can to get out of the classroom and run up to the office to gossip. So, I was helping change the diapers while she was out. This includes two who are not mobile and have to be lifted. Neither of them like to lay on the changing table. I got my new shirt ripped, scratched, and bitten. I also had to listen to that student scream at the top of his/her (trying to be ambiguous, and not share gender here) lungs the whole rest of the day.

    Today was terrible. We could not stick to a schedule. We had melt down after melt down. We had therapists coming in left and right to "talk to me" about x, y, and z during instruction. But, tomorrow's another day, and I'm thirsty anyway, so bring on the rain!! My point: We all have days or weeks like that no matter how many years you've been in this profession. It will get better!
     
  16. teachld

    teachld Rookie

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    Sep 8, 2014

    This is normal

    I hated my first year teaching special education. It's my second year and I don't hate it as much as I use to.

    Trust me, it gets easier. You also have to look at your school environment. Like, if your work place is toxic, or the disability you are teaching, maybe a transfer would be best. I transferred and i love my new position. Less kids on my caseload, things are more organized, and the people are a lot nicer to collaborate with.

    All schools and situations are different. I went from crying everyday at my last school to laughing and joking at my new school. Hang in there. I too, had panic attacks everyday and couldn't sleep well. I was always fatigued, nervous and unsure of myself.
     
  17. ms.irene

    ms.irene Connoisseur

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    Sep 8, 2014

    Reading this thread just makes me even more in awe of what SPED teachers do every day. We "mainstream" teachers b&%*^ and moan about what we do, but we couldn't do it without your help, and then I feel like too many of us even gripe about that! Your job is so hard and thankless, so I guess I am just saying thank you to those of you who choose this work!

    And to the OP, if it isn't for you, there is no shame in admitting that, either -- we are not all cut out for the same tasks. It's possible that you are dealing with new-teacher stress, but it's also possible that you are in the wrong place, but it's impossible for us to tell the difference from afar. I hope there is someone near you who you can trust to help you figure out what you need!
     
  18. keylime3.14

    keylime3.14 Rookie

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    Sep 29, 2014

    Wow, I can relate. The beginning of the year is always overwhelming for me (this is my 5th year teaching) because EVERYTHING you are required to do ALL year long is presented to you in one fell swoop. For me what tends to help is just focus one one week at a time. Also, remember that it's okay to ask questions and ask for help. You are new. People do expect a LOT out of special education teachers, but it's OK to ask questions. Even if the person who is assigned as your mentor isn't helpful (my first one was in it for the money, and was a terrible role model, and in my current position I don't have a mentor even though I am supposed to), talk to other teachers who seem friendly to see if they can help you. If you come to this forum to post specific questions, people can help you think of ideas and solutions.

    Also, make sure that, even though you are super-overwhelmed, you are taking time for yourself. I often work on things in the evenings, but I have a rule that I don't work for an hour after I get home. Due to the nature of my position, I am with my students from the minute they get off the bus until the minute they get back on, so even if I have a lot to work on in the evening, I make myself take a break. I think it's important!

    If you truly don't feel that you are cut out for this job, there is no shame in it. But it does get better. It just takes a while to find your groove.
     
  19. Crafty6

    Crafty6 Rookie

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    Oct 3, 2014

    I am a first year SPED teacher too. I am really sorry that you feel like this. After the first couple of weeks I felt like I wanted to run away but I am starting to really love my job, and as challenging as it is, I am learning to accept things and mot take it so personally. It does help that I have a great support system of paras, teachers, social workers, etc who really can sympathize with me regarding the dynamics of my classroom. But I do understand how you feel. Remember, you will get the hang of it. I feel like I have no idea what I am doing sometimes but take it one day at a time. It should get better. Do you think you can at least finish out the year?

    I just attended CPI training by choice and hope to attend more intensive training. They are really helpful. What is it about your class that you can't stand?
     
  20. Teachwrite!

    Teachwrite! Rookie

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    Oct 4, 2014

    I am so very sorry. Special education is an extremely difficult and stressful job. If you want to quit, you absolutely have that power. Your health is much more important. However, I think if you want to tough it out a little longer, I have some suggestions.

    Take care of YOURSELF first. Remember the directions on an airline flight, put your mask on first, and the child's second. Who will be able to help them if you pass out? If you need a break or a breather. Take it. Go to the back of the classroom or the bathroom and do something that can help you feel better.

    Second, breathe. When your paras are looking at you for direction, pause, take a breath and determine what the next most logical step would be. If you are in flight or fight mode and full of adrenalin, you can't think clearly. It is okay if the kids scream or exhibit difficult behavior for a few minutes while you think.

    Many of them are having huge difficulty with any type of change or transition. The more scheduled and predictable you can make it for these kids, the better. Think preschool--good morning song, clean up song, going to recess song, etc. Picture schedules, etc. They crave routine so they can manage their own expectations and feel safe.

    Right now, worry more about the routine and helping them adjust rather than the a,b,c stuff. Having them calm and focused has to come first. You are their model and if you seem upset, they will model it.

    Give it a few weeks. Then focus on the tiniest, most achievable goal that will increase each child's quality of life or success in school. These are very behaviorism-directed ideals. Small rewards for little things that add up to a preferable activity. For example, a child has to earn 5 stickers to play with a toy s/he likes or gets a break, etc. So, the child is screaming and the para is able to calm them a bit, they get one sticker. Then another, and a reminder that five stickers will get them out of an environment they don't like. The frustrating part is that the progress is often slow.

    You CAN do it. But you don't have to if you don't want to. I give you full permission (not that you need it) to follow your own mindset and do what will make you the happiest. You have complete control over your life and what you want to do.

    If you want to try a little longer, I would make a deal with myself. I would say, "I will give it two more weeks to see if I can make even the tiniest of advances in these kids' lives and my ability to be in this classroom. If I don't succeed, or hate it in spite of what I've done, I can leave."

    Just remember that you are not supposed to change their lives dramatically over night. They are having just as much difficulty adjusting as you are. They go home and cry, too.

    I have seen so many jaded, mean special ed teachers, that I know that if the only thing you do is help them feel comfortable, understood, and cared for, that will make the biggest difference for them and you. Make those YOUR only IEP goals for yourself and let go of the rest. Again, you do not have to do this and no one would blame you if you give up.

    Just give it two more weeks. I have found my biggest accomplishments in teaching have come from helping these kids make small changes that led to a much better quality of life for them and their caretakers. We are all here for you.

    Oh, I forget, get some exercise that makes you sweat daily to relieve the stress. Letting it go of it physically will help relieve the need to cut a bit.

    Best wishes!
     
  21. LisaLisa

    LisaLisa Companion

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    Oct 5, 2014

    I do not know how I was able to get through the first year of teaching these kids in the mod/severe class.
    Interruptions all day long, anyone and everyone giving me advice and criticism, being told - "Are you sure you can do this job? Is this right job for you? You might be better off teaching a different population."
    I wanted to run away and hide but I didn't. I refused to listen or give up. It takes time to learn how to work with these children and the first year is the worst, or the fourth, or the twentieth. It depends on the amount of support you have, the kids in the class, the materials available, and all the stuff you don't get to control. That is what makes the job so hard. What you cannot control.
    I survived that year and it is the right job for me. I walked in with very little experience and did well under the circumstances. Could I have done better? Yes. No question about that.
    Each week and month my teaching improves and I now have the experience and hindsight to see past all the difficulties that I face. Now the negative comments from others are gone and I'm told, "Wow how did you ever get through that first year?" It does get "easier" but the hard stuff still is there.
    This job is not for everyone. That's why it's called Special Ed.
     
  22. teachld

    teachld Rookie

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    Oct 6, 2014

    Maybe it's the school. I hated my school last year but when I transferred to my new school, I love my job now, colleagues, administration. Every one does everything differently... maybe you need a new school, new administration, new kids, grade level, disability. Last year, was my first year teaching.

    I cried everyday and was bullied by my colleagues and administration. I felt like such a bad teacher everyday, because I was being criticized to death.


    But, my new school is nicer and more welcoming and understanding, nurturing.

    Change your environment first before quitting. I almost quit last year in the middle of the year, because I felt so bad about myself all the time. It's normal as a first year sped teacher. It was overwhelming.
     
  23. cleanon

    cleanon New Member

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    Jun 4, 2015

    I am reading this "old" thread for inspiration and guidance into my own challenges as a sped teacher. I am wrapping up year 10. Has it gotten easier? Well, what do you mean by easier? In some ways, the work itself has reduced as I have learned ways to get things done more efficiently and become more realistic with what I truly need to get done and what is instead a distract er or something I am being too perfectionistic on. The level of intense dislike for my position has also substantially reduced as I have found coping mechanisms. Many of which have been mentioned above, taking a breath, pausing, physical exercise...etc. I have always had a difficult time with my emotional sensitivity and coping with unpleasant feelings. Being a Sped teacher has been the best possible place to work these issues out as there is no hiding from intense stress, strong emotions and deep frustrations. While in some ways this job has gotten easier I am in no way happier with it then I was when I first started. In fact, I site almost "giving up" on being great as both the best and worst thing I have done for my position. I used to come up with a great new program or idea each year that was often praised and recognized by the few professionals I worked with who didn't feel threatened by creativity. But I have clawed my way tooth and nail through each day of each year and have to view this job as a marathon not a sprint. In my positions I have never felt supported to do the level of creation and innovation I am capable of. Lesson planning, grading, data, IEP writing... all of these are NOT my strong suite and fill me with the kind of anxiety that can ruin an entire summer as I realize each day I am further from the next summer vacation. Re-thinking that last sentence makes me feel like I'm one heck of a negative guy and I don't want to give that impression or be one for that matter but I have not had the smoothest past 10 years. I have been attacked (professionally and verbally) by paras and co-workers in my first two years. One para collected all class materials (in a multiple disabilities classroom where teacher made materials ARE the curriculum) and threatened to take them and give them to the old teacher (the one I replaced). I have had a co-worker contact my most challenging parents to tell them I was unfit to teach their children. In the next district I was both praised by security guards as they almost never had to come to my classroom to remove students (they used to come down daily/weekly with the previous teacher) and yet I was put on a plan of assistance and had unannounced observations 4 xs a week for an entire school year. This was because I made the mistake of pissing off the director of spec. ed by asking at a seminar on "inclusion" how one could follow these suggestions in a classroom where 18/20 students were on an IEP? I was told "you can't, that's not inclusion" and was shortly there after on a plan of assistance. In my current position of 5 years, I am a multiple disabilities teacher again. I have had the WORST challenges with assistants or para's. I am not respected by them and so getting them to follow my direction is virtually impossible. Since this has been a pattern for me, I have not ruled out that I have issues with assertiveness that set the ball rolling for poor para direction down the road. I had a parent for the past five years that has been the epitome of a sue happy nightmare individual. If I mentioned some of the stories there I feel I would be too specific but suffice it to say I have been told by administrators upon my being hired that I was taking "the hardest position in the building" and this was before this parent pulled her shinannogans. Now I am faced with the decision to possibly move across country to be an EBD teacher in a high school, teaching all content areas to four different grade levels. Does it get easier? I can honestly say that at least once a year I do a few hours of online research into "what else can I do with a special education background". I KNOW I am here for the kids. I know I can reach them and have had tremendous success in this area. I know I am creative and forward thinking in a way that is uncommon among my colleagues. These may not be the most beneficial characteristics of a successful Sped Teacher however and I have to be open to that possibility. I am curious how the OP ended the year.

    Best wishes to all doing this job and all posting in these forums. It is a tremendous help and I wish I would have gotten into them 10 years ago.
     
  24. TeachingESE

    TeachingESE New Member

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    Jun 28, 2015

    Teaching with Anxiety

    I am going to be a first year teacher in Special Education. My major is NOT in Education. I have had experience as a t/a. I read that many first year teachers have had terrible anxiety, panic attacks, stress, depression etc. I already have very bad anxiety (social and general anxiety disorders). I am wondering if I am going to survive. I deal well usually (I have learned to live with it grudgingly yet successfully)...but if teachers without anxiety disorders are having panic attacks, I can't imagine what I will have. I am feeling nervous. Confident in my teaching abilities, but not so much with paperwork (as that is new to me) and adult social interactions/pressures. I have had great trainings and experience in the classroom as a t/a, but it sounds like the first year is a nightmare. Any tips? or any teachers with anxiety issues even before they started? I'm more nervous about the first week of meetings/introducing myself and observations than ANYTHING else.
     
  25. TexanTeach

    TexanTeach Rookie

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    Jun 29, 2015

    It's been really interesting reading through this old thread! From my experience, when it comes to teaching (both in general and special education), it definitely does get easier in time.

    I guess for advice, I would recommend taking it one day at a time, as it can seem very overwhelming to think about everything all at once. On top of all the typical teaching work (planning, assessment, etc) there's also a lot of additional paper work in the spec ed field. I think to start, I would really focus on getting to know your students, as that is what your lessons are based on - their individual needs (which you will have to outline in their IEP's).

    Also, don't be afraid to ask for help from those who know what to do. I was lucky to have great support staff to really help me out - especially the resource teacher. You mentioned not knowing what to do for paperwork (or not feeling too confident with that), but that's something that takes time to learn. My first year in spec ed I had to ask the other spec ed teachers and resource teacher a lot of questions throughout the year when it came to paperwork, because it was the type of thing I never had to do in the regular classroom. I'm sure your coworkers will be understanding that this is new to you.

    Best of luck with your new job! I'm someone can get a lot of anxiety, especially with new jobs, but I just took things one day at a time and tried to focus on the immediate things that needed attention, as to not get overwhelmed. While the start is very busy, and can feel stressful, I ended up LOVING being in spec ed! And still do :)
     
  26. AutismInKinder

    AutismInKinder New Member

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    Jul 1, 2015

    Wow! I am so sorry the OP was feeling so stressed! I hate for anyone to feel that way! I just completed my first year teaching in a self contained classroom K-1 and while I had days that I thought, "what the heck was I thinking?" LOL overall it was a GREAT experience! Does that mean I did everything right? Nope! But I tried my best and it can only get better!

    Last year I only had 2 weeks to prepare for my class and that included me having to go through orientation and workshops. I was stressed and overwhelmed. I guess it gave me some insight into how some of my kids feel on a daily basis. I had 10 5 and 6 year olds, most who had never been in school or any kind of early intervention before. Most had autism and serious behavioral challenges. I survived and my kids made progress, what more could I ask for? LOL

    I hope everything worked out for the OP!
     

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